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Material Lends a Hand to Device Design

Mon, 09/10/2007 - 6:36am


Whether it’s to improve the dexterity of video gamers or the motor functions of stroke survivors, the Xtensor device was designed to accommodate the upper-extremity therapeutic needs of virtually everyone. When Clinically Fit Inc. developed this therapeutic conditioning device, the company called upon Bayer MaterialScience LLC (BMS) for its unwavering support, literally. BMS’s Texin 985 thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) comprises the back hand strap of this lightweight and sporty device, lending both excellent slip-resistant and comfortable support.

True to its name, the Xtensor is designed to strengthen one’s extensor muscles, tendons, and finger joints, applying resistance when a user opens his or her hands. Weighing in at a mere five ounces, the innovative device consists of a wrist wrap, back hand strap and palm support, complete with five adjustable finger bands. While the Xtensor was originally intended to provide rehabilitation from corrective surgery or trauma, it can also be used to prevent repetitive-stress injuries and tendonitis. Thus, gamers, golfers, tennis players, surgeons, dentists and computer-users can all benefit from regular use of the Xtensor.

During the design stage, Clinically Fit selected Texin 985 TPU as the material for the device’s back hand strap, primarily due to its extreme durability and excellent molding grade. “We needed something sturdy, yet flexible,” said Scott Kupferman, CEO of Clinically Fit. Texin 985 TPU offered both excellent abrasion resistance and elasticity, eliminating problems such as stress cracking or fatigue. “Texin 985 TPU not only lends support to the bulk of the device, but with its unique soft-grip properties, is surprisingly comfortable to the touch.”

Information: www.BayerMaterialScienceNAFTA.com.

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