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Artificial Blood Vessel Better Assesses Clot Removal Devices

April 17, 2015 3:53 pm | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in...

New Genomic Test Improves Lung Cancer Diagnosis

April 17, 2015 3:49 pm | by Veracyte, Inc. | News | Comments

Veracyte, Inc., a molecular diagnostic company pioneering the field of molecular cytology, today...

Telling the Time of Day by Color

April 17, 2015 2:38 pm | by PLOS | News | Comments

Research by scientists at The University of Manchester has revealed that the color of light has...

Clot Removal Device Dramatically Improves Outcomes for Stroke Patients

April 17, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

A new device to remove obstructing blood clots can significantly improve outcomes for people who...

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FDA Approves Over-the-Counter Blood Glucose Meter

April 17, 2015 2:27 pm | by Abbott Laboratories | News | Comments

The cost of insurance premiums and employee medical claims continues to rise in the United States, which is especially challenging for people living with chronic conditions such as diabetes. For people with diagnosed diabetes, average, direct...

Biocompatible, Antimicrobial Coating Shown to Limit Bacterial Growth

April 17, 2015 12:28 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A Purdue University innovation that has been shown to limit long-term bacterial growth is being developed for commercialization by Poly Group LLC, a technology company located in the Purdue Research Park of Southeast Indiana. The patented...

DNA Blood Test Detects Lung Cancer Mutations

April 17, 2015 12:19 pm | by European Society for Medical Oncology | News | Comments

Cancer DNA circulating in the bloodstream of lung cancer patients can provide doctors with vital mutation information that can help optimize treatment when tumor tissue is not available, an international group of researchers has reported at the...

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FDA and CMS Form Task Force on LDT Quality Requirements

April 17, 2015 12:15 pm | by Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D. and Patrick H. Conway, MD, MSc | Blogs | Comments

Health care providers and their patients expect that laboratory tests used in clinical management of patients should be consistent and of high quality. Under FDA’s proposed framework for the oversight of laboratory developed tests (LDTs)...

Why Has Remote Patient Monitoring Been So Slow to Adopt?

April 17, 2015 9:53 am | by Peter Ianace, Principal, Sensogram Technologies, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

Patients, providers, and insurers all have a vested interest in improving the health care system. Remote patient monitoring is the most logical place to start. We all agree that prevention is the most efficient way to shift the cost curve, improve...

Our Skeleton Is a Lot Like Our Brain

April 17, 2015 9:34 am | by Monash University | News | Comments

Researchers from Monash University and St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne have used mathematical modeling combined with advanced imaging technology to calculate, for the first time, the number and connectivity of the osteocyte...

Newly Discovered Stem Cells are Easier to Manipulate

April 17, 2015 9:31 am | by University of Missouri - Columbia | News | Comments

Pre-eclampsia is a disease that affects 5 to 8 percent of pregnancies in America. Complications from this disease can lead to emergency cesarean sections early in pregnancies to save the lives of the infants and mothers. Scientists believe...

More Versatile, Sensitive Optical Resonance-Based Biosensors

April 17, 2015 9:27 am | by Elhuyar Fundazioa | News | Comments

Abián Bentor Socorro-Leránoz, a telecommunications engineer of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has designed in his PhD thesis optical resonance-based biosensors for use in medical applications like, for example, the detecting of...

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Brain Stimulation Boosts Creativity and May Treat Depression

April 17, 2015 9:02 am | by University of North Carolina Health Care | News | Comments

A UNC School of Medicine study has provided the first direct evidence that a low dose of electric current can enhance a specific brain pattern to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent in healthy adults, according to a common, well-validated...

Leveraging Wi-Fi and Mobile Health in Combat Operations Settings

April 17, 2015 8:53 am | by U.S. Army | News | Comments

Imagine arriving at a major medical center with a life-threatening medical condition. Imagine now, this facility has no paging or cell phone capability. How will the right doctor be alerted that you need treatment to save your life? The Telemedicine...

Diagnosing Disease Through Dental Plaque

April 16, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Toronto - Faculty of Dentistry | News | Comments

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. By collecting and analyzing plaque samples...

Electronic Micropump Delivers Treatments Deep Within the Brain

April 16, 2015 2:32 pm | by INSERM | News | Comments

Many potentially efficient drugs have been created to treat neurological disorders, but they cannot be used in practice. Typically, for a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. For this...

4-Channel Frame Grabber

April 16, 2015 2:13 pm | by Sensoray | Sensoray Company | Product Releases | Comments

Sensoray announces its new Model 2255 4-channel frame grabber, which captures uncompressed frames from four National Television System Committee (NTSC) or Phase Alternation by Line (PAL) video sources and sends them over USB 2.0 to a host computer. Frames are captured simultaneously from all channels. With exceptionally low latency...

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Evaluating Balance in Glaucoma Patients with Virtual Reality

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by American Academy of Ophthalmology | News | Comments

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and morbidity in older adults, especially those with a chronic eye disease such as glaucoma. To investigate this problem, a multidisciplinary group of researchers has become the first...

New Muscle Regeneration Approach Eliminates Need for Donor Tissue

April 16, 2015 11:58 am | by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers | News | Comments

Loss of muscle volume is a common and often debilitating outcome of traumatic orthopedic injury, resulting in muscle weakness and suboptimal limb function. A new therapeutic approach in which small pieces of autologous muscle can be expanded...

Study to Demonstrate Value of PET Scans in Alzheimer's Diagnosis

April 16, 2015 11:24 am | by Alzheimer's Association | News | Comments

A new four-year research study, with an estimated budget of $100 million, was announced today by the Alzheimer's Association and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The Imaging Dementia - Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study will...

Analyzing Medical Data via Your Smartphone

April 16, 2015 11:04 am | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Your smartphone could be a valuable tool for medical research — and for treating a variety of ailments. IBM wants to use the power of its Watson computing system — which famously won TV's "Jeopardy" a few years back — to analyze mountains...

3D Printed Heart Model Helps Toddler to Breathe Easier

April 16, 2015 10:39 am | by Globe Newswire | News | Comments

3D Systems has announced that a 20-month-old toddler is breathing and swallowing easier thanks to a team of cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, who used a full-color 3D printed...

Cold Plasma Device Used In World's First Surgical Procedure To Kill Cancer Tumor Cells

April 16, 2015 10:28 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A surgical team coordinated by the US Medical Innovations, LLC (USMI) family of companies, completed the world's first clinical procedure using cold plasma for the selective killing of cancerous tissue at Baton Rouge General Medical Center in Baton...

MRI Machine Helps Crack Medical Mystery

April 16, 2015 10:18 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

Medtech continues to help researchers in a number of ways in the development of advanced medical technologies, pharmaceutical solutions, and unlocking the secrets of the human body. Recent news reveals that it’s once again lending a hand...

Understanding How Complex Carbon Nanostructures Form

April 16, 2015 9:26 am | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are microscopic tubular structures that engineers “grow” through a process conducted in a high-temperature furnace. The forces that create the CNT structures known as “forests” often are unpredictable and are mostly...

Breath Test Could Predict and Diagnose Stomach Cancer

April 15, 2015 3:59 pm | by BMJ-British Medical Journal | News | Comments

A new type of technology that senses minute changes in the levels of particular compounds in exhaled breath, accurately identifies high risk changes which herald the development of stomach cancer, reveals research published online in the journal...

Hydrogel Provides First-Ever Prostate Cancer Treatment

April 15, 2015 3:38 pm | by University Hospitals Case Medical Center | News | Comments

The radiation oncology team at UH Seidman Cancer Center at UH Geauga Medical Center performed the first-ever prostate cancer treatment on April 3 using a newly approved device. The device, called SpaceOAR System, enhances the efficacy of radiation...

Nanoparticles Fight Tooth Decay

April 15, 2015 3:32 pm | by Katherine Unger Baillie, University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Nanotechnology may sound futuristic, but it has already found its way into household products, from cosmetics to cleaning solutions. And with a little help from a School of Dental Medicine scientist, consumers may one day even find nanoparticles...

Engineering a Smarter Stride

April 15, 2015 3:27 pm | by Ken Kingery, Duke University | News | Comments

If you asked Ivonna Dumanyan just five years ago where she’d be today, starting a running tech company at Duke University would never have crossed her mind. But thanks to a lot of hard work and the entrepreneurial resources provided across...

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