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Computer Model to Better Understand Gastrointestinal Disease

November 20, 2014 10:47 am | by Tufts University | News | Comments

Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from Texas A&M University have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal tract microorganisms...

Making the Case for Reusable Custom Cases

November 19, 2014 5:11 pm | by Tim Jennings, CEO, EPS | Articles | Comments

Customized cases provide medical device manufacturers and health care professionals with durable...

Electronic 'Tongue' Analyzes Food Quality

November 12, 2014 10:10 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

An electronic "tongue" could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit...

An Endoscopy with a Panoramic View

October 30, 2014 4:16 pm | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

Whether physicians examine or operate on the bladder wall with an endoscope, they can catch a...

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Bioengineering Intestinal Tissue to Treat Gastrointestinal Diseases

October 23, 2014 9:27 am | by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital | News | Comments

Researchers have successfully transplanted “organoids” of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice – creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Reporting their...

Spinal Stimulator Could Improve Bladder Function for Paralyzed

October 17, 2014 10:47 am | by University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

People who have suffered spinal cord injuries are often susceptible to bladder infections, and those infections can cause kidney damage and even death. New UCLA research may go a long way toward solving the problem. A team of scientists studied...

Shape-Memory Wire Tube Provides Better Bladder Disease Treatment

October 16, 2014 11:45 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The millions of people worldwide who suffer from the painful bladder disease known as interstitial cystitis (IC) may soon have a better, long-term treatment option, thanks to a controlled-release, implantable device invented by MIT professor...

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Detecting Colon Cancer Earlier

October 8, 2014 9:50 am | by Université du Luxembourg | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Luxembourg have identified potential new ways to test for the first signs of one of the most deadly types of cancer: colorectal cancer. They have found new “biomarkers”: molecules whose increased presence or...

Photos of the Day: Drug Injections via a Pill

October 1, 2014 11:43 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have devised a novel drug capsule coated with tiny needles that can inject drugs directly into the lining of the stomach after the capsule is swallowed. When the pill reaches the desired...

New Drug-Delivery Capsule May Replace Injections

October 1, 2014 11:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Given a choice, most patients would prefer to take a drug orally instead of getting an injection. Unfortunately, many drugs, especially those made from large proteins, cannot be given as a pill because they get broken down in the stomach before...

Engineering Update #77: A Portable Artificial Kidney

September 25, 2014 3:18 pm | by Jonathan Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Medical researchers have received approval to begin safety and performance testing of the Wearable Artificial Kidney. The federal Food and Drug Administration and the University of Washington Institutional Review Board accepted the protocol...

True Blue: Saving Tiny Lives With LED Lights

September 25, 2014 2:12 pm | by GE Healthcare | News | Comments

When Dr. Rajesh Kumar meets his patients for the first time, they can often fit into the palms of his hands. Kumar is a medical specialist who cares for tiny infants in Jharkhand, the largely rural Indian state located west of...

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Tonsil Stem Cells Could Someday Help Repair Liver Damage Without Surgery

September 24, 2014 2:01 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a way to potentially...

Researchers Receive $5.8 Million Grant to Build 3D Liver Model

September 24, 2014 11:45 am | by University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences | News | Comments

With a new $5.8 million, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will further develop a state-of-the-art, microfluidic 3D model system that mimics structure...

Researchers Testing Artificial Liver as Potential Therapy for Patients with Alcohol-Related Organ Failure

September 23, 2014 11:52 am | by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center | News | Comments

Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists are testing a novel, human cell based, bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure, often a fatal diagnosis. “The quest for a device that can fill in for the function of...

Fast and Accurate PCR-Based Diagnostics of Gastroenteritis

September 23, 2014 11:02 am | by B3C Newswire | News | Comments

Mobidiag Ltd, a Finnish molecular diagnostics company specialized in the development of innovative diagnostics solutions for infectious diseases, today announced the European launch of Amplidiag Bacterial GE, marketed as a CE-IVD product under...

Photos of the Day: Dialysis Belt

September 23, 2014 10:06 am | by Leila Gray, HSNewsBeat | News | Comments

The Wearable Artificial Kidney, also known as the WAK, is a miniaturized dialysis machine that can be worn on the body. The carrier resembles a tool belt; the device connects to a patient via a catheter. The Wearable Artificial Kidney features...

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Wearable Artificial Kidney Safety Test Receives Go-Ahead

September 23, 2014 9:52 am | by Leila Gray, HSNewsBeat | News | Comments

Medical researchers have received approval to begin safety and performance testing of the Wearable Artificial Kidney. The federal Food and Drug Administration and the University of Washington Institutional Review Board accepted the protocol...

Study: Magnetic Implant Is an Important Breakthrough in the Treatment of Reflux Disease

September 22, 2014 9:46 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Torax Medical announced today the publication of new data comparing the LINX Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation Device and laparoscopic fundoplication surgery in 249 patients. Data from this study significantly adds to the growing body of evidence...

Smartphones May Aid in Dietary Self-Monitoring

September 10, 2014 10:06 am | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

Smartphones have seen wide adoption among Americans in recent years because of their ease of use and adaptability. With that in mind, researchers from Arizona State University examined how smartphone use affected weight loss goals and determined...

Milestone Reached in Work to Build Replacement Kidneys

September 9, 2014 10:27 am | by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | News | Comments

Regenerative medicine researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have addressed a major challenge in the quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab. Working with human-sized pig kidneys, the scientists developed the most successful...

FDA Allows Marketing of the First Test to Assess Risk of Developing Acute Kidney Injury

September 5, 2014 11:35 am | by U.S. Food and Drug Administration | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed marketing of the NephroCheck test, a first-of-a-kind laboratory test to help determine if certain critically ill hospitalized patients are at risk of developing moderate to severe acute kidney...

Positive Clinical Data for First Procedural Therapy to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

September 4, 2014 12:21 pm | by Fractyl Labs | News | Comments

Fractyl Laboratories Inc. today announced positive clinical data for the first procedural therapy to directly treat the underlying digestive causes of insulin resistance in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. The non-invasive Revita...

Vygon Group Buys Medwin

September 2, 2014 11:19 am | by Andrew Lloyd & Associates | News | Comments

Vygon, the specialist single-use medical devices group, today announces its acquisition of Medwin, a company company based in southern France, specialized in enteral nutrition (feeding pumps) and related accessories. The financial terms of the...

New Feeding Tube Connectors Will Improve Patient Safety

August 21, 2014 2:05 pm | by American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition | News | Comments

New feeding tube connectors, designed by an international standards process, will be available soon and will improve patient safety. According to an invited review published in the OnlineFirst version Nutrition in Clinical Practice...

Global Tissue Engineering and Regeneration Market to Reach $56.9 Billion in 2019

August 18, 2014 10:09 am | by BCC Research | News | Comments

BCC Research reveals in its new report, Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: Technologies and Global Markets, the global market for tissue engineering and regeneration is expected to grow to $56.9 billion by 2019, with a five-year compound...

23andMe announces agreement with Pfizer to research inflammatory bowel disease

August 12, 2014 3:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company today announced an agreement with Pfizer Inc. in which the companies will aim to enroll 10,000 people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in a research initiative designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity and response to treatments for IBD.

Disposable Biosensor Allows Physicians to Determine Which Patients Can Be Safely Fed Following Surgery

August 8, 2014 10:01 am | by University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences | News | Comments

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs...

Growing Human GI Cells May Lead to Personalized Treatments

August 7, 2014 12:11 pm | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Reporting online recently...

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