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5 Key Lessons to Successfully Prepare and Publish Data to the FDA’s GUDID

October 13, 2014 8:30 am | by Denise Odenkirk, Senior Director, Industry Solutions, GHX | Blogs | Comments

While the deadline for medical device companies to submit Class III product data to the FDA's Production Global UDI Database (GUDID) passed on September 24, 2014, the remaining 90 percent of all medical device implantables, as well as products...

Effectiveness of Low Dose CT Screening for Lung Cancer

October 13, 2014 8:30 am | by Jen Jenkinson | Articles | Comments

More people are diagnosed with lung cancer than any other malignancy around the world, with around 200,000 new diagnoses in the US each year1. Unfortunately, lung cancer has a poor survival rate, with about 150,000 deaths annually from the disease...

X-Ray Source for Panoramic/Ceph/CT Applications

October 13, 2014 8:30 am | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

Spellman High Voltage Electronics Corporation announces the introduction of its new PDM Dental Monoblock X-Ray Source. This compact and lightweight integrated high voltage power supply, filament power supply and X-Ray tube assembly is ideal for...

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Wearable Sensor Interface Will Make Prosthetics More Comfortable

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by University of Texas at Arlington | News | Comments

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and...

Radio Waves Sensor Technology Could Put Electronic ‘Touch’ on Prosthetics

October 10, 2014 11:51 am | by Stanford School of Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries. The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like...

RFID Technology Localizes Breast Tumors

October 10, 2014 11:40 am | by UW-Madison | News | Comments

Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy, and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected. Especially the...

Orthopedic Implants Could Cause Skin Cancer

October 10, 2014 11:22 am | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer...

Erasing Memories with Light

October 10, 2014 10:52 am | by University of California - Davis | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together...

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Implantable Device and Stem Cells Could Contribute to Cure for Diabetes

October 10, 2014 10:39 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Harvard stem cell researchers today announced that they have made a giant leap forward in the quest to find a truly effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, a condition that affects an estimated three million Americans at a cost of about $15 billion...

Enhancing Drug Delivery Through the Skin

October 10, 2014 10:25 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Southampton have identified key characteristics that enhance a nanoparticle's ability to penetrate skin, in a milestone study which could have major implications for the delivery of drugs. Nanoparticles are up...

Detecting Depression in the Elderly

October 10, 2014 10:11 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Specialists at the Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM) of Mexico developed a system that achieved detecting depression in older adults, through monitoring their daily routine. This technology can be used as an auxiliary tool for the care of...

Common Laboratory Filter Paper Detects Disease

October 10, 2014 10:04 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Using a common laboratory filter paper decorated with gold nanoparticles, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a unique platform, known as “plasmonic paper,” for detecting and characterizing even trace amounts of...

Implantable Medical Devices that Dissolve When No Longer Needed

October 10, 2014 9:53 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Electronic devices that dissolve completely in water, leaving behind only harmless end products, are part of a rapidly emerging class of technology pioneered by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Early results demonstrate...

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Casting Custom-Shaped Metal Nanoparticles Like Watermelons

October 10, 2014 9:23 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have unveiled a new method to form tiny 3D metal nanoparticles in prescribed shapes and dimensions using DNA, Nature's building block, as a construction...

3D Printing for the Medical Sector

October 10, 2014 8:30 am | by Klaus Jopp, Technical Writer | Articles | Comments

One of the largest technology companies in the U.S. is now also planning to get into 3D printing. The management of the IT giant Hewlett Packard anticipates that the world market for 3D printers and related software and services will grow from...

IEEE Technology Time Machine Takes on the Future of Health

October 9, 2014 4:06 pm | by Bruce Wheeler, IEEE | Blogs | Comments

Innovation is driving a seemingly exponential growth of health-monitoring devices, many aimed at consumers with accuracy and reliability that falls far short of what is needed in the highly regulated healthcare market. Innovators need to be...

New Screening Technique Requires Just One Drop

October 9, 2014 12:48 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

A new technique makes it possible to quickly detect the presence of drugs or to monitor certain medical conditions using only a single drop of blood or urine, representing a potential tool for clinicians and law enforcement. The technique works...

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

October 9, 2014 11:04 am | by Margaret A. Hamburg, Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration | Blogs | Comments

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and...

Power of a Clinical Lab in the Home

October 9, 2014 10:58 am | by Cambridge Consultants | News | Comments

Product design and development firm Cambridge Consultants has unveiled a new approach to diagnostic instrument development. The Flow Health Hub brings the power of the clinical laboratory into the home – in the shape of a simple, cost-effective...

Moving Nanoparticles Through the Body with Magnets

October 9, 2014 10:48 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

A long-sought goal of creating particles that can emit a colorful fluorescent glow in a biological environment, and that could be precisely manipulated into position within living cells, has been achieved by a team of researchers at MIT and...

Developing Complex Biosensors with Synthetic Polymers

October 9, 2014 10:15 am | by Arizona State University | News | Comments

A new four-year, multi-million dollar award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DARPA will be used to develop the technology necessary to synthesize, screen, and sequence artificial genetic polymers composed of threose...

Tracking Metastatic Cancer Through the Blood

October 9, 2014 10:07 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

The genetic fingerprint of a metastatic cancer is constantly changing, which means that the therapy that may have stopped a patient's cancer growth today, won't necessarily work tomorrow. Although doctors can continue to biopsy the cancer...

Teflon-Like Coating for Improved Blood-Screening

October 9, 2014 10:02 am | by Ken Kingery, Duke University | News | Comments

A new technology to exponentially improve blood-screening for transfusions has leapfrogged its way from Duke University lab to corporate development. In an unusually streamlined tech-transfer deal, a two-year-old startup company founded...

A Nobel Prize Winning Look into Single-Molecule Microscopy

October 9, 2014 9:55 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising, Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells...

A Remote Control for Neurons

October 9, 2014 9:43 am | by The Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A proposal to develop a new way to remotely control brain cells from Sarah Stanley, a Research Associate in Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, headed by Jeffrey M. Friedman, is among the first to receive funding...

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