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MedTech Memoirs: Artificial Limbs

April 22, 2015 2:55 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

Believe it or not, the earliest recorded use of an artificial limb dates back to the book of Vedas from Sanksrit, India, believed to have been written between 3,500 and 1,800 B.C. It describes Queen Vishpla, an Indian warrior queen, who...

Anesthesia Workstations: Is Monitoring Affecting Product Choice?

April 22, 2015 11:16 am | by Jessica Edge, Analyst, Clinical Care Devices, IHS Medical Technology | Blogs | Comments

The market for anesthesia devices is largely divided into stand-alone anesthesia machines and anesthesia workstations (those sold with a patient monitor of the same brand). Stand-alone anesthesia machines leave the manufacturer without a patient...

World-First: MRI Used to Study Infant Pain

April 22, 2015 11:10 am | by Oxford University | News | Comments

The brains of babies 'light up' in a very similar way to adults when exposed to the same painful stimulus, a pioneering Oxford University brain scanning study has discovered. It suggests that babies experience pain much like adults. The study...

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How War Veterans Quietly Manage Tinnitus

April 22, 2015 11:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Tinnitus, a debilitating "ringing in the ears", has become the No. 1 service- connected disability among veterans, surpassing post-traumatic stress disorder. Because military personnel are exposed to aircraft, loud equipment, and explosive noises...

Using Smartphones to Avoid Spatial Disorientation of Elderly

April 22, 2015 10:46 am | by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid | News | Comments

Researchers from UPM have used technologies of the network operators to locate and send alerts when an old person with mild cognitive impairment suffers from episodes of disorientation. Biomedical Engineering and Telemedicine group of...

A More Effective Way to Create Motor Neurons

April 22, 2015 10:41 am | by University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

Research on treating neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and spinal muscular atrophy has long been hindered by the difficulty of producing the different kinds of motor neurons needed to...

Transportable MRI Speeds Up Stroke Patients' Diagnosis and Treatment

April 22, 2015 10:37 am | by Victoria University of Wellington | News | Comments

Named the ‘MRI Ambulance’, the design places a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner within a refrigerated shipping container which can be transported on the back of a flatbed truck. “Unlike mobile MRIs, the MRI Ambulance is designed...

Photos of the Day: Video Game Helps Diagnose Tuberculosis

April 22, 2015 10:03 am | by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid | News | Comments

Every week, people around the world play over 3 billion hours of videogames. What if, instead of shooting aliens or stealing cars, playing these games helped diagnose diseases? This opportunity is the foundation of TuberSpot, an online game that...

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Home-Based Treatment of Autism

April 22, 2015 9:50 am | by CORDIS | News | Comments

Much can still be done to improve autism treatment besides finding a cure. The MICHELANGELO project, which ended in March, has developed a set of technologies for personalized, home-based behavior monitoring and treatment of patients. For...

FDA Draft Guidance on the Acceptance of Medical Device Clinical Data

April 22, 2015 9:11 am | by U.S. Food & Drug Administration | News | Comments

Today the FDA posted draft guidance on the Acceptance of Medical Device Clinical Data from Studies Conducted Outside the United States (OUS). When finalized, this guidance will provide information on: FDA’s policy of accepting scientifically...

DNA Markers Could Allow Noninvasive Cancer Screening

April 22, 2015 9:06 am | by Mayo Clinic | News | Comments

A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has succeeded in identifying the source of cancer in patients' gastrointestinal tracts by analyzing DNA markers from tumors. The results open the possibility that doctors could one day be able to screen for cancer...

Increasing Accuracy of Rejection Identification in Heart Transplant Recipients

April 22, 2015 9:02 am | by CareDx | News | Comments

CareDx, Inc. a molecular diagnostics company focused on the development and commercialization of clinically differentiated, high value, non-invasive surveillance solutions for transplant recipients, today announced new evidence that the...

Real-Time Feedback a Boon in Rehab

April 21, 2015 3:22 pm | by University of Technology, Sydney | News | Comments

Laser-cut acrylic tiles with a 3D printed core and the capacity to be wired up to “interact” with patients offer a new tool for people recovering from stroke and other brain injury. The highly sensitive stepping tiles are linked to a computer...

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St. Jude Medical Announces Intent to Acquire Spinal Modulation, Inc.

April 21, 2015 3:13 pm | by St. Jude Medical | News | Comments

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, today announced it has exercised the company’s exclusive option to acquire Spinal Modulation, Inc., developer of the Axium Neurostimulator System. Following the completion of this...

Sweat Sensor Stops Car If Blood Alcohol Level Is Too High

April 21, 2015 2:33 pm | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

As a strategy to decrease road accidents caused under the influence of alcohol, a group of young students at the Institute of Technology of Cintalapa, Chiapas, (southeast state of Mexico) develops an automotive safety system that detects the...

Singing 'If I Only Had a Brain' with Super-Fast MRI

April 21, 2015 2:26 pm | by Beckman Institute | News | Comments

In order to sing or speak, around one hundred different muscles in our chest, neck, jaw, tongue, and lips must work together to produce sound. Beckman researchers investigate how all these mechanisms effortlessly work together—and how they...

Printing Silicon on Paper, with Lasers

April 21, 2015 2:21 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

In seeking to develop the next generation of micro-electronic transistors, researchers have long sought to find the next best thing to replace silicon. To this end, a wealth of recent research into fully flexible electronic circuitry has focused...

Blue Man Group Lends a Hand to MedTech Design

April 21, 2015 11:10 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

Not long ago, Robert Downey Jr. (or Tony Stark…or Ironman) helped deliver a bionic arm to a young boy, Alex Pring. It was a great “feel-good” story and the boy seemed pretty pleased with his new prosthetic. Then, earlier this month, Blue Man Group...

'Reminiscence Therapy' App for Dementia Patients

April 21, 2015 10:38 am | by Bangor University | News | Comments

Bangor University is providing expertise to support the development and effectiveness of ‘Book of You’, an ‘app’ being welcomed as having the potential to revolutionize reminiscence therapy for people with dementia. Reminiscence is widely used...

World's First Smartphone Breathalyzer for Smokers

April 21, 2015 10:33 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

IntelliQuit, the world's first smartphone breathalyzer for smokers, was selected to present as a finalist at the American Heart Association's Health Sciences Innovation - Investment Forum in New York City on Wednesday April 22. Thirty percent...

Detecting Low Quality Antimalarial Drugs with a Lab-on-Paper

April 21, 2015 10:12 am | by University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Access to high-quality medicine is a basic human right, but over four billion people live in countries where many medications are substandard or fake. Marya Lieberman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre...

Imaging System Could Let Women Skip Annual Mammograms

April 21, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Texas at El Paso | News | Comments

Technology developing at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is on track to predict if and when breast cancer will appear. “We’re creating a breast cancer risk analysis system,” said electrical engineer Wei Qian, Ph.D., who runs...

Imaging Immunity

April 21, 2015 10:00 am | by Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research | News | Comments

A novel approach that allows real-time imaging of the immune system's response to the presence of tumors--without the need for blood draws or invasive biopsies--offers a potential breakthrough both in diagnostics and in the ability to monitor...

Non-Invasive OCT May Improve Management of Leading Causes of Blindness

April 21, 2015 9:44 am | by Oregon Health & Science University | News | Comments

Research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) demonstrates that technology invented by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute can improve the clinical management of the...

FDA Approves First-of-Its-Kind Corneal Implant

April 21, 2015 9:22 am | by U.S. Food & Drug Administration | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the KAMRA inlay, a device implanted in the cornea of one eye (the clear, front surface) to improve near vision in certain patients with presbyopia. It is the first implantable device for...

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