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The Lead

A 12-Second, High-Resolution 3D Full Body Scan

May 22, 2015 2:20 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

Imagine 3D printers churning away, producing a rhythmically mesmerizing technological cacophony of additive manufacturing. Amidst the din stood an enormous booth, which immediately caught my eye, as it was quickly rotating around someone standing inside...

A Second Life for MRI Magnets

May 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

When it comes to magnets, a doctor’s trash is a physicist’s treasure. Researchers at the U.S....

Two-Photon Ophthalmoscope for Super-Magnification of Retina

May 22, 2015 10:15 am | by Case Western Reserve University | News | Comments

Imagine an instrument that peers deep inside the eye and sees how well the retina's cells...

Using Healthy Skin to Identify Cancer's Origins

May 22, 2015 9:53 am | by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | News | Comments

Normal skin contains an unexpectedly high number of cancer-associated mutations, according to a...

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Genetically Barcoding Tens of Thousands of Cells at a Time

May 22, 2015 9:50 am | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Imagine someone hands you a smoothie and asks you to identify everything that went into it. You might be able to discern a hint of strawberry or the tang of yogurt. But overall it tastes like a blend of indiscernible ingredients. Now imagine that the...

Building the World’s Smallest Machines

May 22, 2015 9:30 am | by Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel | News | Comments

German research Foundation provides millions of euros of funding for the development of new medicines and materials at Kiel University. Great excitement at Kiel University: As the DFG (German Research Foundation) announced today (Thursday, May 21)...

Turning Blood Into Neural Cells

May 21, 2015 12:33 pm | by McMaster University | News | Comments

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. Specifically, stem cell scientists at McMaster can now directly...

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Looking to the Immune System for Cancer Detection

May 21, 2015 10:26 am | by University of St Andrews | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of St Andrews have developed a revolutionary method of identifying cells of the immune system with “molecular fingerprints” which could pave the way for the rapid detection of conditions such as leukemia and lymphoma...

Continuous Glucose Monitoring with Real-Time Measurement Devices

May 21, 2015 10:21 am | by Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care | News | Comments

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes can better control their HbA1c value with a combination of blood glucose self-monitoring (BGSM) and continuous interstitial glucose monitoring (CGM) using a real-time measurement device (real-time CGM)...

L'Oreal Wants to 3D Print Human Skin

May 20, 2015 11:13 am | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | News | Comments

3D bioprinting certainly has its place in medicine. But now cosmetics giant L’Oreal wants to begin automating its already existing process of developing skin to test its products – with a little help from bioprinting startup Organovo. L'Oreal...

Performance-Enhancing Sensor Measures Fluid Loss During Exercise

May 20, 2015 10:24 am | by University of Strathclyde | News | Comments

A wearable device being developed by the University of Strathclyde will provide real-time data analysis of fluid loss during exercise to enhance the performance of fitness enthusiasts and elite athletes. The innovative transdermal sensor is...

Testing the 'Squishiness' of Tumors

May 20, 2015 10:17 am | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

Tumors come in all shapes, sizes ... and squishiness. And it turns out that matters, if you want to know how to treat them. USC engineers have created a backpack-sized instrument that can gently smush a wide range of materials, accurately...

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Expect Growth in The $56 Billion-Dollar IVD Market

May 19, 2015 2:36 pm | by Kalorama Information | News | Comments

Kalorama Information says a number of trends bode well for testing and will drive growth in the next five years, including new markets and private healthcare expansion globally. The market for all in vitro diagnostic testing kits, instruments...

What Makes Cancer Cells Spread? New Device Offers Clues

May 19, 2015 2:25 pm | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question. In a paper published in Scientific...

TBI Blood Test Could Reduce Unnecessary CT Scans

May 19, 2015 12:02 pm | by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers | News | Comments

New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. The potential...

Blood Biomarkers Aid in Alzheimer’s Battle

May 19, 2015 9:55 am | by Anke van Eekelen, Science Network WA | News | Comments

Researchers are developing an effective low-cost screening tool to facilitate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnosis for the first time by analyzing different combinations of proteins in blood. ECU research fellow Dr. Veer Gupta presented her ongoing...

Microchip Captures Clusters of Circulating Tumor Cells

May 18, 2015 4:25 pm | by National Institutes of Health | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and...

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Effectiveness of Genomic Test for Lung Cancer Detection

May 18, 2015 10:33 am | by Boston University Medical Center | News | Comments

A new test co-developed by a Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researcher will allow patients suspected of having lung cancer to be subjected to fewer and less-invasive tests to determine if they have the disease. "We are seeing an...

New Screening Method for Prostate Cancer Recurrence

May 18, 2015 9:49 am | by Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology | News | Comments

The American Cancer Society estimated that 220,800 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2015. Approximately 27,540 men will die of the disease, accounting for 5 percent of all cancer deaths. A common treatment...

Blood Test for Early Breast Cancer Metastasis Detection

May 18, 2015 9:29 am | by Lund University | News | Comments

Research findings from Lund University in Sweden now provide new hope for a way of detecting metastases significantly earlier than is currently possible. The chances of being cured of breast cancer have increased in recent decades, however if the...

Get to Know Your Cat on a Microbial Level

May 15, 2015 3:39 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | News | Comments

One group of researchers addresses the question of how bacteria are affecting our feline companions, with a Kickstarter-funded project entitled “kittybiome.” Because if microbes living on and in the body can affect humans in such a variety...

Food Dye and Near Infrared Light Aid in Breast Resection

May 15, 2015 12:01 pm | by The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth | News | Comments

Roughly 1 in 4 women having breast conserving surgery (BCS) return to the surgical suite for further resection because of cancerous tissue left behind due to unclear margins. Investigators at the Optics in Medicine Lab at Dartmouth's Thayer...

Blood Test Provides Guide to Personalized Hepatitis C Therapy

May 15, 2015 11:57 am | by American Gastroenterological Association | News | Comments

A simple blood test can be used to predict which chronic hepatitis C patients will respond to interferon-based therapy, according to a report in the May issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology,1 the basic science journal...

Noninvasive, Robust Early Liver Cancer Detection

May 15, 2015 9:31 am | by Georgia State University | News | Comments

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. Their findings...

Game-Changing Personalized Ovarian Cancer Screening Test

May 15, 2015 9:19 am | by GlobalData | News | Comments

The encouraging recent results of a 14-year study by the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening could herald a radical departure from the approach established by other screening tests for cancer, providing the final data is...

New Test Detects Drug Use from a Single Fingerprint

May 15, 2015 9:02 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Research published today in the journal Analyst has demonstrated a new, noninvasive test that can detect cocaine use through a simple fingerprint. For the first time, this new fingerprint method can determine whether cocaine has been ingested...

3 Statistician Tips for Engineering IVD Success

May 14, 2015 4:22 pm | by Vincent Crabtree, PhD, Senior Manager, New Technology Development, JDRF | Blogs | Comments

When developing in vitro diagnostic devices, and diagnostic devices, displaying volts or ADC counts is usually insufficient. A statistical algorithm is almost always required to convert the stream of electronic sensor data into a clinical relevant...

Sound Waves Could Be Viable Alternative in Diagnosing Minor Fractures

May 14, 2015 4:02 pm | by RCNi | News | Comments

The authors conducted a study of the usefulness and efficiency of portable ultrasound in detecting the presence of minor fractures in patients presenting to a minor injuries unit. Analysis showed that 85% of patients with a fracture confirmed...

Smoking Induces Early Signs of Cancer in Cheek Swabs

May 14, 2015 11:57 am | by University College London | News | Comments

DNA damage caused by smoking can be detected in cheek swabs, finds research published today in JAMA Oncology. The study provides evidence that smoking induces a general cancer program that is also present in cancers which aren't usually associated...

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