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Pneumonia Revealed in a Cough

June 27, 2013 4:12 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

A new method, which analyzes the sounds in a child's cough, could soon be used in poor, remote regions to diagnose childhood pneumonia reliably. According to Udantha Abeyratne from the University of Queensland in Australia and colleagues, this simple technique of recording coughs with a microphone on the patient's bedside table, has the potential to revolutionize the management of childhood pneumonia in remote regions around the world.

New Red Blood Cell Simulator Invented At Queen Mary

June 27, 2013 3:58 pm | by Queen Mary, University of London | News | Comments

Engineers from Queen Mary, University of London have developed the most precise computer simulation of how red blood cells might travel around the body to help doctors treat people with serious circulatory problems. Understanding how damaged red blood cells might interact with each other or their neighboring cells could be useful in realizing blood flow in patients who are diabetic or have had surgery to address circulation complications.

High-Resolution Mapping Technique Uncovers Underlying Circuit Architecture of the Brain

June 27, 2013 3:53 pm | by Gladstone Institutes | News | Comments

In the latest issue of Neuron, a team led by Gladstone Investigator Anatol Kreitzer, PhD, and Salk Investigator Edward Callaway, PhD, combined mouse models with a sophisticated tracing technique—known as the monosynaptic rabies virus system—to assemble brain-wide maps of neurons that connect with the basal ganglia, a region of the brain that is involved in movement and decision-making.

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Lens-Free Imaging Technique Dramatically Extends Research Capabilities into Cells, Bacteria, and Viruses

June 27, 2013 12:48 pm | by Business Wire | News | Comments

CEA-Leti today introduced a new video lens-free imaging technique that redefines bio imaging, provides significant advantages over traditional microscopy, and opens a new range of capabilities for researchers, such as real-time monitoring of cell cultures.

Device Designed to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

June 27, 2013 12:15 pm | by Johns Hopkins | Videos | Comments

When a breast tumor is detected, many women opt to have a lumpectomy, which is surgery designed to remove the diseased tissue while preserving the breast. But during this procedure, doctors cannot learn right away whether all of the cancerous tissue has been removed, with no microscopic signs that cancer cells were left behind.

Johns Hopkins Students’ Device Aims to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

June 27, 2013 11:57 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

To reduce the need for second surgeries, four Johns Hopkins graduate students have designed a device to allow pathologists to quickly inspect excised breast tissue within 20 minutes, while the patient is still in the operating room. If this inspection indicates that the tumor was not fully removed, additional tissue can then be removed during the same operation.

The Pulse: Artificial Pancreas Supplies Insulin to Patients

June 27, 2013 11:13 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a major step toward an artificial pancreas, detecting disease from just one drop blood, creating mature human cardiac patches from human heart cells, and a smart sock that helps runners improve their technique and prevent injuries.  

Spinning Up Antibacterial Silver on Glass

June 27, 2013 10:30 am | by Inderscience Publishers | News | Comments

The antibacterial effects of silver are well established. Now, researchers at Yonsei University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, have developed a technique to coat glass with a layer of silver ions that can prevent growth of pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni. The technology could be used to protect medical equipment.

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Quantum Engines Must Break Down

June 27, 2013 10:18 am | by University College London | News | Comments

Our present understanding of thermodynamics is fundamentally incorrect if applied to small systems and needs to be modified, according to new research from University College London (UCL) and the University of Gdańsk. The findings, published today in Nature Communications, have wide applications in small systems, such as biological motors and systems found in the body.

Powering the Homecare Medical Device Market

June 26, 2013 2:54 pm | by John Benatti, Field Applications Engineer, Astrodyne | Articles | Comments

With the 3rd Edition of IEC 60601-1 impacting U.S. design engineers in June, it is critical they are aware of the implications to their medical device designs. For home healthcare devices, there is a collateral standard that will have a specific effect. This article focuses in on powering these products and the items in the standard of significance for that aspect.

Laser Guided Codes Advance Single Pixel Terahertz Imaging

June 26, 2013 9:42 am | by Boston College | News | Comments

Padilla and researchers in his lab recently reported a breakthrough in efforts to create accessible and effective THz imaging. Using both optical and electronic controls, the team developed a single-pixel imaging technique that uses a coded aperture to quickly and efficiently manipulate stubborn THz waves, according to a recent report in the journal Optics Express.

Biozoom Enters Into Commercial Phase of Scanner Production

June 26, 2013 9:42 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Biozoom scanner non-invasively measures and analyzes the biomarkers critical to understanding, managing, and improving a user's health and wellness. The prototype units have been validated in clinical trials and used at respected European institutions. The first commercially produced scanners are expected to arrive in September.

PMA Final Decisions for April 2013

June 26, 2013 12:00 am | by U.S. Food & Drug Administration | News | Comments

These are Premarket Approvals (PMA), Product Development Protocols (PDP), Supplement and Notice Decisions. This list is generated on a monthly basis. A PDF document that contains the "Approval letter and Summary of Safety and Effectiveness" is being added to this listing for each PMA. The PMA number will appear as a link if this document is available.

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Weight Is Key in Design of Consumer MedTech

June 25, 2013 4:00 pm | by Jessica Irons, Marketing/Business Development Specialist, Sonoco Protective Solutions | Blogs | Comments

When designing a medical device that is meant to be used directly by patients in their home, the designer has to keep in mind that the environment of a patient’s home is likely going to be dramatically different compared to a medical facility.

Problem-Solving Governs How We Process Sensory Stimuli

June 25, 2013 11:28 am | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Various areas of the brain process our sensory experiences. How the areas of the cerebral cortex communicate with each other and process sensory information has long puzzled neuroscientists. Exploring the sense of touch in mice, brain researchers from the University of Zurich demonstrate that the transmission of sensory information from one cortical area to connected areas depends on the task to solve and the goal-directed behavior.

Past Brain Activation Revealed in Scans

June 25, 2013 11:11 am | by Weizmann Institute of Science | News | Comments

What if experts could dig into the brain, like archaeologists, and uncover the history of past experiences? This ability might reveal what makes each of us a unique individual, and it could enable the objective diagnosis of a wide range of neuropsychological diseases.

Bacterial DNA May Integrate into Human Genome More Readily in Tumor Tissue

June 24, 2013 4:51 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Bacterial DNA may integrate into the human genome more readily in tumors than in normal human tissue, scientists have found. The researchers, affiliated with the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Genome Sciences, analyzed genomic sequencing data available from the Human Genome Project, the 1,000 Genomes Project and The Cancer Genome Atlas.

Sugar Solution Makes Tissues See-Through

June 24, 2013 4:40 pm | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Japanese researchers have developed a new sugar and water-based solution that turns tissues transparent in just three days, without disrupting the shape and chemical nature of the samples. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, this technique enabled them to obtain detailed images of a mouse brain at an unprecedented resolution.

Portability Is the Name of the Game

June 24, 2013 2:12 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Mega Electronics, Inc., Tdk - Lambda Americas, Analog Devices, Inc., Maxon Precision Motors, Inc., Microsemi Corp./Corporate | Articles | Comments

Medical electronic devices are no longer a trend; they are the reality of today’s healthcare environment. Seemingly, the number of powered medical devices far exceeds their non-powered counterparts. Even devices that had traditionally not been powered, such as the stethoscope, are now either being replaced by more effective electronic devices or being updated with electronics to function more efficiently and, more simply, better.

Concord Medical Announces Launch of Mobile Health Application

June 24, 2013 12:13 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Concord Medical Services Holdings Limited, a leading specialty hospital management solution provider, operator of the largest network of radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging centers in China and the parent of Chang'an Hospital, today reported that it has launched DoctorInPocket or Zhang Shang Hao Yi, in Chinese, a mobile health application.

Breakthrough in Nanodevice Biosensors

June 24, 2013 12:07 pm | by Yale | News | Comments

Imagine a swarm of tiny devices only a few hundred nanometers in size that can detect trace amounts of toxins in a water supply or the very earliest signs of cancer in the blood. Now imagine that these tiny sensors can reset themselves, allowing for repeated use over time inside a body of water – or a human body.

Device Detects Disease with Drop of Blood

June 24, 2013 10:48 am | by New Jersey Institute of Technology | News | Comments

An NJIT research professor known for his cutting-edge work with carbon nanotubes is overseeing the manufacture of a prototype lab-on-a-chip that would someday enable a physician to detect disease or virus from just one drop of liquid, including blood.

Assessing Performance of Colonoscopy Procedures Improves Quality

June 24, 2013 10:10 am | by American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy | News | Comments

A new study reports that the use of a quarterly report card is associated with improved colonoscopy quality indicators. Endoscopists at the Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Indianapolis, Ind., who participated in the study showed an overall adjusted adenoma (precancerous polyp) detection rate increase from 44.7 percent to 53.9 percent, and a cecal intubation rate increase from 95.6 percent to 98.1 percent.

Simulating Solutions for Molding Challenges

June 21, 2013 4:18 pm | by Tim Lankisch, Director of Engineering, CAE Services | CAE Services Corporation, Arburg Gmbh + Co Kg | Articles | Comments

Design and development of a medical device is an exacting process, to say the least, and it assumes even more complexity because it almost always extends across years that encompass multiple iterations of the device. As a result, small things that were satisfactory in the prototype and first production run can grow to be problems that must be solved as production volume rises.

MEDICA Conferences & Forums

June 21, 2013 1:50 pm | by Messe Düsseldorf | Events

The conference program for MEDICA 2013, International Trade Fair with Congress – World Forum for Medicine, is undergoing a full re-launch. The content repositioning for MEDICA 2013 (to be held from November 20 – 23, 2103 in Düsseldorf, Germany) is designed to closely fit the program of the trade fair’s topics relevant to medical equipment users and to expand the international side of the program.

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