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Telemedicine Consultations Significantly Improve Pediatric Care in Rural Emergency Rooms

August 9, 2013 12:16 pm | by University of California - Davis Health System | News | Comments

Telemedicine consultations with pediatric critical-care medicine physicians significantly improve the quality of care for seriously ill and injured children treated in remote rural emergency rooms, where pediatricians and pediatric specialists are scarce, a study by researchers at UC Davis Children's Hospital has found.

An Electric Therapy for Medical-Device Malware

August 9, 2013 12:00 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Hospital rooms beep and flash with many devices that are increasingly getting infected with malware. But for several reasons, these gadgets are often incompatible with commercial security software. Now, new technology developed by academic researchers could catch most malware on the devices just by noting subtle changes in their power consumption.

FDA Approves First Rapid Diagnostic Test to Detect both HIV-1 Antigen and HIV-1/2 Antibodies

August 8, 2013 3:13 pm | by Food and Drug Administration | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) test for the simultaneous detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen as well as antibodies to both HIV-1 and HIV-2 in human serum, plasma, and venous or fingerstick whole blood specimens.

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Capturing Live Tumor Cells in the Blood

August 8, 2013 11:45 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Tumor cells circulating within a patient's bloodstream can carry cancer from a primary tumor site to distant sites of the body, spreading the disease. Now a team of researchers in China has developed a new microfluidic chip that can quickly and efficiently segregate and capture live circulating tumor cells from a patient's blood, with potential applications for cancer screenings and treatment assessments.

The Pulse: MRI-Safe Stimulator Implanted

August 8, 2013 10:27 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Welcome to the Pulse, brought to you by MDT TV. Today, we're implanting an MRI-safe spinal cord stimulator, sorting blood with a microchip, building robots out of biocompatible hydrogel, and making hydrogel move with light.           

GE, University of Washington to Develop 'Diagnostics-on-Demand' Device

August 8, 2013 9:00 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

You’ve heard of on-demand TV, now imagine on-demand medical diagnosis – anytime, anywhere in the world. Scientists at GE Global Research are working with a team based at the University of Washington to develop a new medical device, the size of a pack of playing cards, that can detect infectious disease by way of a simple nasal swab, in less than an hour.

Cancer Research Implies Future for Personalized Medicine

August 7, 2013 11:24 am | by The Journal of Visualized Experiments | News | Comments

The Journal of Visualized Experiments has published two new methods for scientists to study and treat tumor growth. The methods introduce a lab-born, human tissue structure with replicated human biochemistry – offering scientists the opportunity to grow, observe, and ultimately learn how to treat biopsied human tumor cells.

Sony DADC Develops Smart Consumables for Quanterix Simoa HD-1 Analyzer

August 7, 2013 9:00 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Quanterix Corporation, delivering the world’s most sensitive single molecule immunoassay measurement for the benefit of human health, today announced that the Simoa HD-1 Analyzer recently launched by Quanterix uses a “Smart Consumable” designed and manufactured by Sony DADC BioSciences called the Simoa Disc.

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Seeing Depth Through a Single Lens

August 6, 2013 12:02 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | News | Comments

Researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a way for photographers and microscopists to create a 3D image through a single lens, without moving the camera. Published in the journal Optics Letters, this improbable-sounding technology relies only on computation and mathematics—no unusual hardware or fancy lenses.

Microchip Sorts White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

August 6, 2013 10:35 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

MIT scientists have developed a new microchip that can quickly separate white blood cells from samples of whole blood, eliminating any preliminary processing steps—which can be difficult to integrate into point-of-care medical devices. The hope, the researchers say, is to integrate the microchip into a portable diagnostic device.

Hologic's femur fracture test wins FDA clearance

August 6, 2013 9:29 am | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Hologic touted a new FDA clearance for its Single Energy Femur Exam, a test for finding rare, unusual femur fractures that pose a high risk to patients. The diagnostic exam is intended for patients that do not respond to bisphosphonates, drugs prescribed to prevent osteoporosis.

Light that Moves and Molds Gels

August 5, 2013 12:47 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Some animals—like the octopus and cuttlefish—transform their shape based on environment, fending off attackers or threats in the wild. For decades, researchers have worked toward mimicking similar biological responses in non-living organisms, as it would have significant implications in the medical arena.

Alere™ MobileLink Receives FDA Clearance

August 5, 2013 11:38 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Alere Connect has been granted a 510(k) market clearance by the U.S. FDA for the Alere MobileLink.  The new product offering is one of Alere's connected device technologies designed to empower patients by allowing self-testing at home and delivering data quickly and seamlessly to clinical systems accessed by their healthcare providers.

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Catching Cancer Early by Chasing It

August 5, 2013 11:01 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Reaching a clinic in time to receive an early diagnosis for cancer -- when the disease is most treatable -- is a global problem. And now a team of Chinese researchers proposes a global solution: have a user-friendly diagnostic device travel to the patient, anywhere in the world.

Novel 3D Simulation Technology Helps Surgical Residents Train More Effectively

August 5, 2013 10:58 am | by American College of Surgeons | News | Comments

A novel interactive 3Dimensional (3D) simulation platform offers surgical residents a unique opportunity to hone their diagnostic and patient management skills, and then have those skills accurately evaluated according to a new study appearing in the August issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

FDA Clears Hologic's Single Energy Femur Exam to Visualize Features Associated with Developing Atypical Femur Fractures on a DXA Platform

August 1, 2013 4:07 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Hologic announced it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for the Company's Single Energy (SE) Femur Exam on a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) platform for the assessment of features associated with atypical femur fractures (AFF).

A New Tool for Brain Research

August 1, 2013 2:03 pm | by University of Nottingham | News | Comments

Physicists and neuroscientists from The University of Nottingham and University of Birmingham have unlocked one of the mysteries of the human brain, thanks to new research using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG).

3D Colonoscopy Eases Detection of Precancerous Lesions

August 1, 2013 10:29 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

MIT researchers have developed a new endoscopy technology that could make it easier for doctors to detect precancerous lesions in the colon. Early detection of such lesions has been shown to reduce death rates from colorectal cancer, which kills about 50,000 people per year in the United States.

Cradle & App Turn Smartphone into a Handheld Biosensor

August 1, 2013 10:10 am | by The Associated Press | Videos | Comments

The handheld biosensor was developed by researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. A series of lenses and filters in the cradle mirror those found in larger, more expensive laboratory devices. Together, the cradle and app transform a smartphone into a tool that can detect toxins and bacteria, spot water contamination and identify allergens in food.

Smartphone Cradle & App Combine to Create Biosensor

August 1, 2013 10:07 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Afraid there may be peanuts or other allergens hiding in that cookie? Thanks to a cradle and app that turn your smartphone into a handheld biosensor, you may soon be able to run on-the-spot tests for food safety, environmental toxins, medical diagnostics and more.

European Urological Device Market Will Be Driven By Adoption Of New Minimally Invasive Devices

August 1, 2013 8:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

According to Millennium Research Group (MRG), the global authority on medical technology market intelligence, patient and hospital demand for minimally invasive and discreet devices is rising within European markets for urological devices, and products that meet these needs are poised to see strong adoption through 2021.

Tiny, Brightly Shining Silicon Crystals Could Be Safe for Deep-Tissue Imaging

July 31, 2013 12:14 pm | by Charlotte Hsu, University at Buffalo | News | Comments

Tiny silicon crystals caused no health problems in monkeys three months after large doses were injected, marking a step forward in the quest to bring such materials into clinics as biomedical imaging agents, according to a new study. The findings suggest that the silicon nanocrystals, known as quantum dots, may be a safe tool for diagnostic imaging in humans.

Chemists Develop Innovative Nano-Sensors for Multiple Proteins

July 31, 2013 12:07 pm | by Universität Mainz | News | Comments

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a new method for parallel protein analysis that is, in principle, capable of identifying hundreds or even thousands of different proteins. It could be used to detect the presence of viruses and identify their type in tiny samples.

A Spectrometer for the Future

July 31, 2013 10:25 am | by Eric Gershon, Yale University | News | Comments

Taking advantage of the sensitive nature of randomly scattered light, Yale University researchers have developed an ultra-compact, low-cost spectrometer with improved resolution over existing micro models. The innovation represents an advance in “lab-on-a-chip” technology, or the consolidation of laboratory capabilities in miniature, highly portable devices.

Panel Backs Lung Cancer Screening for Some Smokers

July 30, 2013 12:54 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

For the first time, government advisers are recommending screening for lung cancer, saying certain current and former heavy smokers should get annual scans to cut their chances of dying of the disease. If it becomes final as expected, the advice by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force would clear the way for insurers to cover CT scans, a type of X-ray, for those at greatest risk.

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