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Case Closed: Diagnosing on Mobile Devices Requires FDA Class II Clearance

April 27, 2015 2:55 pm | by Kyle Peterson, Director, Regulatory & Corporate Affairs, Calgary Scientific | Blogs | Comments

This February the FDA released updated guidance on mobile medical applications for the first time since 2013. This new guidance offers insight into the agency's plans for regulating the rapidly growing number of applications that turn smartphones...

Developing Effective Tests for 'Chemo Brain'

April 27, 2015 11:05 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to...

3D Method Improves the Study of Proteins

April 27, 2015 10:26 am | by Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona | News | Comments

Current knowledge of the molecular bases of protein aggregation, the cause of several...

Motion-Tracking MRI Assesses A-Fib Patients' Stroke Risk

April 27, 2015 9:58 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of...

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First Liquid Nanolaser Could Lead to New "Lab-on-a-Chip" Design

April 27, 2015 9:38 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Northwestern University scientists have developed the first liquid nanoscale laser. And it's tunable in real time, meaning you can quickly and simply produce different colors, a unique and useful feature. The laser technology could lead to...

Pocket-Sized Ultrasound Devices Reduce Need for Further Testing

April 27, 2015 9:26 am | by European Association for the Study of the Liver | News | Comments

Results from a study presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 demonstrate that the use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device (PUD) helps to reduce the need for further testing in both the inpatient and outpatient setting...

4 Awesome Technologies Featured at WIRED Health 2015

April 24, 2015 3:03 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

Back in December 2014, Intel announced that it was working with Stephen Hawking to create a new system for him to communicate and interact. The company also mentioned that they would make the platform available to the research community...

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What’s Needed to Achieve Scalable Production of Tissues

April 24, 2015 10:55 am | by Lauralyn McDaniel, Industry Manager, Medical, SME | Blogs | Comments

Producing or growing tissues that could avoid the immune response of donor tissues sounds far-fetched, but in some limited applications has already been achieved. Tissues for drug development testing are already available. Replacement skin...

'Micro Fingers' for Arranging Single Cells

April 24, 2015 10:36 am | by Toyohashi University of Technology | News | Comments

Functional analysis of a cell, which is the fundamental unit of life, is important for gaining new insights into medical and pharmaceutical fields. For efficiently studying cell functions, it is essential to reconstruct cellular microenvironments...

Adding a New Wrinkle in Graphene to Cell Culture

April 24, 2015 10:32 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a technique that introduces tiny wrinkles into sheets of graphene, researchers from Brown University have developed new textured surfaces for culturing cells in the lab that better mimic the complex surroundings in which cells grow...

Measuring Volumes of Key Lab-on-a-Chip Components

April 24, 2015 10:01 am | by NIST | News | Comments

Imagine shrinking tubes and beakers—in fact, most of a clinical chemistry lab—down to the size of a credit card. When engineers figured out how to do that two decades ago, they enabled complex tests to be performed with tiny "lab on a chip"...

Portable MRI Could Aid Wounded Soldiers in Third World

April 24, 2015 9:46 am | by Kevin Roark, Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the...

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Palm-Sized Chip Attacks Drug-Resistant Bacteria

April 24, 2015 9:04 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A Johns Hopkins engineer, supported by a major NIH grant, is leading a multi-institution team that wants to keep bacterial infections from dodging the dwindling arsenal of drugs that destroy the deadly microbes. The group’s goal is to...

Round-the-Clock Glucose Control for Pregnant Diabetic Women

April 23, 2015 10:46 am | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Achieving better glucose control in pregnant women with diabetes by using continuous glucose monitoring may help them give birth to healthier children, new research from the University of Leeds says. Up to 50% of babies born to women with...

How a Computer Can Help Your Doctor Better Diagnose Cancer

April 23, 2015 10:40 am | by Adam Conner-Simons, CSAIL | News | Comments

Correctly diagnosing a person with cancer — and identifying the specific type of cancer — makes all the difference in successfully treating a patient. Today your doctor might draw from a dozen or so similar cases and a big book of guidelines...

Quick, Easy-to-Use Ketosis Breath Test Will Benefit Diabetics

April 23, 2015 9:56 am | by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) | News | Comments

VTT has developed a quick, easy-to-use ketosis test for consumers that can detect acetone on exhaled breath. The test will benefit diabetics and dieters in particular, but it can easily be adapted to other uses as well, such as the detection...

Drug-Eluting Implant Determines Personalized Cancer Treatment

April 22, 2015 4:04 pm | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

More than 100 drugs have been approved to treat cancer, but predicting which ones will help a particular patient is an inexact science at best. A new device developed at MIT may change that. The implantable device, about the size of the grain...

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Transportable MRI Speeds Up Stroke Patients' Diagnosis and Treatment

April 22, 2015 10:37 am | by Victoria University of Wellington | News | Comments

Named the ‘MRI Ambulance’, the design places a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner within a refrigerated shipping container which can be transported on the back of a flatbed truck. “Unlike mobile MRIs, the MRI Ambulance is designed...

Photos of the Day: Video Game Helps Diagnose Tuberculosis

April 22, 2015 10:03 am | by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid | News | Comments

Every week, people around the world play over 3 billion hours of videogames. What if, instead of shooting aliens or stealing cars, playing these games helped diagnose diseases? This opportunity is the foundation of TuberSpot, an online game that...

DNA Markers Could Allow Noninvasive Cancer Screening

April 22, 2015 9:06 am | by Mayo Clinic | News | Comments

A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has succeeded in identifying the source of cancer in patients' gastrointestinal tracts by analyzing DNA markers from tumors. The results open the possibility that doctors could one day be able to screen for cancer...

Increasing Accuracy of Rejection Identification in Heart Transplant Recipients

April 22, 2015 9:02 am | by CareDx | News | Comments

CareDx, Inc. a molecular diagnostics company focused on the development and commercialization of clinically differentiated, high value, non-invasive surveillance solutions for transplant recipients, today announced new evidence that the...

Sweat Sensor Stops Car If Blood Alcohol Level Is Too High

April 21, 2015 2:33 pm | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

As a strategy to decrease road accidents caused under the influence of alcohol, a group of young students at the Institute of Technology of Cintalapa, Chiapas, (southeast state of Mexico) develops an automotive safety system that detects the...

Detecting Low Quality Antimalarial Drugs with a Lab-on-Paper

April 21, 2015 10:12 am | by University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Access to high-quality medicine is a basic human right, but over four billion people live in countries where many medications are substandard or fake. Marya Lieberman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre...

Imaging System Could Let Women Skip Annual Mammograms

April 21, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Texas at El Paso | News | Comments

Technology developing at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is on track to predict if and when breast cancer will appear. “We’re creating a breast cancer risk analysis system,” said electrical engineer Wei Qian, Ph.D., who runs...

Imaging Immunity

April 21, 2015 10:00 am | by Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research | News | Comments

A novel approach that allows real-time imaging of the immune system's response to the presence of tumors--without the need for blood draws or invasive biopsies--offers a potential breakthrough both in diagnostics and in the ability to monitor...

Whole Slide Imaging for Pediatric Specimens

April 21, 2015 9:13 am | by Pediatric and Developmental Pathology | News | Comments

Whole slide imaging is an emerging technology that is poised to impact the practice of medicine by extending the virtual reach of pathologists. Classified as a medical device by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, whole slide imaging must...

Detecting Lung Cancer at an Early Stage

April 21, 2015 8:55 am | by Ruhr-Universität Bochum | News | Comments

A new diagnostic method, namely spectral histopathology, facilitates marker-free detection of individual subtypes of lung cancers. It was developed by researchers at the PURE consortium at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). They have successfully...

One Test for All Infections

April 20, 2015 3:37 pm | by University of Toronto | News | Comments

If you're returning from abroad with a fever, your doctor will likely test you for malaria. You'll give multiple blood samples at the lab, and if the results are inconclusive, you'll face yet another round of tests. Researchers from the University...

Is EEG All That Is Necessary for Alzheimer's Diagnosis?

April 20, 2015 10:34 am | by Wayne State University Division of Research | News | Comments

Mild cognitive impairment, or MCI, may be one of Alzheimer's earliest signs. The subtle changes of MCI include problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment and a subjective sense that mental function is getting worse. MCI is seldom severe...

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