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NIH Awards Sedia Biosciences $195,490 SBIR Grant for Rapid HIV-1 Incidence Assay

August 18, 2014 8:58 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Sedia Biosciences Corporation announced today that it has received a Notice of Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant to develop a Rapid HIV-1 Incidence (or Recency) Assay...

UT Arlington and Pediatrix partner to bring simulation training direct to practice

August 15, 2014 9:45 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A real-time video feed, a laptop and a computerized manikin baby are key components for a new simulation training initiative that allows UT Arlington College of Nursing educators to put Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NNPs) and physicians through the paces of an emergency scenario from hundreds of miles away.

Scripps Research Institute chemists uncover powerful new click chemistry reactivity

August 14, 2014 4:23 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Chemists led by Nobel laureate K. Barry Sharpless at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have used his click chemistry to uncover unprecedented, powerful reactivity for making new drugs, diagnostics, plastics, smart materials and many other products. The new SuFEx—Sulfur Fluoride Exchange—reactions enable ...

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New material could enhance fast and accurate DNA sequencing

August 14, 2014 10:34 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

DNGene-based personalized medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that nanopores in the material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could sequence DNA more accurately ...

“Life was short, disgusting and painful” - CE Aretaeus of Cappadocia

August 14, 2014 9:46 am | by Emily L. Cross, Ph.D., TecMed, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

It is easy to make the assumption that modern medical tools answer to the demands Diabetes Mellitus puts on patients in both surgical and critical care environments. Additionally, it is easy to think that the tools used to measure blood glucose levels to manage day-to-day health are both advanced and accurate. It is true what is available has saved millions of lives, yet, the tools we depend on for survival are almost as archaic as ...

Robotic-assisted imaging: from trans-Atlantic evaluation to help in daily practice

August 12, 2014 10:42 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

While in Germany, Partho P. Sengupta, MD, of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai used a computer to perform a robot-assisted trans-Atlantic ultrasound examination on a person in Boston. In another study Kurt Boman, MD, of Umeå University in Sweden in collaboration with Mount Sinai, showed how a cardiologist's video e-consultation, coupled with ...

Now Begins the Fight Over LDT Regulations

August 12, 2014 8:46 am | by Richard Park, Contributing Editor | Blogs | Comments

As IVD manufacturers and clinical laboratories gathered at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry's (AACC) annual meeting and clinical lab expo in Chicago, FDA made a major announcement that will likely test the relationship between...

Not only in DNA's hands

August 11, 2014 11:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Blood stem cells have the potential to turn into any type of blood cell, whether it be the oxygen-carrying red blood cells, or the many types of white blood cells of the immune system that help fight infection. How exactly is the fate of these stem cells regulated? Preliminary findings from research conducted by scientists from the Weizmann Institute and the Hebrew University are starting to

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A*Star Scientists Make Breakthroughs in Ovarian Cancer Research

August 8, 2014 10:27 am | by Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI) | News | Comments

Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and the Bioinformatics Institute (BII) have found new clues to early detection and personalized treatment of ovarian cancer, currently one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose...

New Sweat Sensors Will Sniff Out Fatigue, Stress, and Even Fear

August 8, 2014 9:17 am | by GE Reports | News | Comments

Sweat can be a smelly messenger, but one that also carries a trove of valuable information about how our bodies are feeling. Scientists at several labs are now trying to pick its lock with nanotechnology, including know-how transferred from...

Professor Awarded $300K for Mobile Health Lab-on-Chip Technology

August 8, 2014 8:54 am | by University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

University of California, San Diego Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Shaya Fainman has been awarded $300,000 from the National Science Foundation to develop a portable device with a disposable cartridge “lab-on-chip” (CLOC)...

Researchers Develop Biomarker for Early Detection of Esophageal Cancer

August 7, 2014 5:06 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

A research team led by Allegheny Health Network surgical oncologist Blair Jobe, MD, has developed and validated a four-protein serum biomarker panel that holds significant promise for early detection of esophageal cancer, a relatively rare...

Photos of the Day: Counterfeiting's Breathalyzer

August 7, 2014 4:45 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

Terry Shyu, a doctoral student in chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, was demonstrating a new high-tech label for fighting drug counterfeiting. While the researchers don't envision movie stars on medicine bottles, but they...

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A Breath Reveals a Hidden Image in Anti-Counterfeit Labels

August 7, 2014 4:45 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

An outline of Marilyn Monroe's iconic face appeared on the clear, plastic film when a researcher fogs it with her breath. Terry Shyu, a doctoral student in chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, was demonstrating a new high-tech...

Scientists Use Lasers and Carbon Nanotubes to Look Inside Living Brains

August 7, 2014 4:24 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford | News | Comments

A team of Stanford scientists has developed an entirely non-invasive technique that provides a view of blood flow in the brain. The tool could provide powerful insights into strokes and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Some of the most damaging...

The Development of Mobile Apps in the Healthcare Industry

August 7, 2014 2:40 pm | by Sarah Peters, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The growth and development of smartphone technology has been phenomenal. In a very short space of time, we moved from very basic mobile phones that only allowed users to make calls, send SMS messages, and play a few simple games, to having...

How Animations Can Help Scientists Test a Hypothesis

August 7, 2014 1:58 pm | by TED | Videos | Comments

3D animation can bring scientific hypotheses to life. Molecular biologist (and TED Fellow) Janet Iwasa introduces a new open-source animation software designed just for scientists…           

Growing Human GI Cells May Lead to Personalized Treatments

August 7, 2014 12:11 pm | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Reporting online recently...

The Pulse: Moving Fluids Across Open Surfaces and Visualizing the 3D Heart

August 7, 2014 11:54 am | by Jonathan Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re moving fluids across active surfaces, visualizing a beating heart in 3D, preventing drowsy drivers, and getting a better night’s rest.             

Researchers Find Infectious Prion Protein in Urine of Patients with Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

August 7, 2014 11:47 am | by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | News | Comments

The misfolded and infectious prion protein that is a marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease – linked to the consumption of infected cattle meat – has been detected in the urine of patients with the disease by researchers at The University...

Scientists Develop Nasal Test for Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 11:43 am | by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian...

Small Device Can Test for Ebola in 15 Minutes

August 7, 2014 10:59 am | by KTVU.com | Videos | Comments

Testing people for the Ebola virus can be an involved and lengthy process. But one Bay Area company  is developing a prototype that can test people on the spot and get results quickly. PositiveID says the device is designed to be used at...

Gut Microbiome Analysis Improved Noninvasive Colorectal Cancer Screening

August 7, 2014 10:48 am | by American Association for Cancer Research | News | Comments

Analysis of the gut microbiome more successfully distinguished healthy individuals from those with precancerous adenomatous polyps and those with invasive colorectal cancer compared with assessment of clinical risk factors and fecal occult...

Brain Tumors Fly Under the Body's Radar Like Stealth Jets

August 7, 2014 10:31 am | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

Brain tumors fly under the radar of the body's defense forces by coating their cells with extra amounts of a specific protein, new research shows. Like a stealth fighter jet, the coating means the cells evade detection by the early-warning...

Infographic: What Engineers Think About Retirement

August 7, 2014 8:14 am | by Kasey Panetta & Eileen Whitmore, ECN Magazine | News | Comments

Retirement, that Golden Age of relaxation and hard-earned rest where you get to prop up your feet on the porch and yell at the neighborhood kids to get off your lawn. ECN wanted to know what engineers had planned for...    

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