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WHO Admits to Botched Ebola Response

October 17, 2014 4:07 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a draft document, the World Health Organization has acknowledged that it botched attempts to stop the now-spiraling Ebola outbreak in West Africa, blaming factors including incompetent staff and a lack of information. In the document obtained...

Students Sharpen Research Skills with the FDA

October 17, 2014 3:49 pm | by Nysia George, Ph.D., Intern Program Coordinator, and Tom Powers, Communication Officer; National Center for Toxicological Research | Blogs | Comments

Biology. Chemistry. Bioinformatics. Toxicology. Practical, hands-on laboratory work is important for all college students who want to become scientists — but, for many of them, such experiences are out of reach. That’s one of the reasons why every...

Diagnosing Healing Complications Before Surgery with Simple Test

October 17, 2014 10:26 am | by Loyola University Health System | News | Comments

As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications, due to radiation they receive before surgery. Now a study has suggested that a simple test called transcutaneous...

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World’s Thinnest Electric Generator Could Power Wearable Medtech

October 17, 2014 10:09 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology have reported the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), resulting in...

Energy Harvesting ICs Power the Electric Body

October 17, 2014 8:30 am | by Niranjan Pathare, Sr. Market Development Manager, Battery Management Solutions, Texas Instruments | Articles | Comments

Homo sapiens are once again at a crucial juncture in their evolution timeline that started almost three million years ago. Evidence of the next phase is already here, but no one knows for sure how or where we will end up. But a term coined...

Tiny Sound-Powered Chip Offers Innovative Medical Applications

October 16, 2014 12:08 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers can already power this prototype medical implant chip without wires by using ultrasound. Now they want to make it much smaller. Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor...

Strategic Alliance Tackles Challenges in Diagnostic Tools and Therapies

October 16, 2014 11:55 am | by MIT News Office | News | Comments

A novel partnership between MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine: improving the diagnosis of disease; developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune...

More Accurate Tests to Determine Ovarian Cancer Treatment

October 16, 2014 11:03 am | by Sam Wong, Imperial College London | News | Comments

Researchers have devised a new test to help doctors diagnose ovarian tumors and choose the most appropriate treatment. Successful treatment depends in part on accurately identifying the type of tumor, but this can be difficult. As a result...

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A Healthy Dose of Facebook

October 16, 2014 9:47 am | by Sam Brusco, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

Facebook allows its users to map the footprints of their various walks of life. It functions as a digital reflection of the human condition, abound with pictures, status updates, links, and private (or, for emphasis, public) conversations...

Biological Sample Prep Time Cut from Days to Minutes

October 16, 2014 9:23 am | by Stephen P. Wampler, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

When Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers invented the field of biological accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in the late 1980s, the process of preparing the samples was time-consuming and cumbersome. Physicists and biomedical...

HIV Self-Test Kit Addresses Worldwide Usability Challenges

October 16, 2014 8:30 am | by David Mantey, Editorial Director, ABM Design Group | Articles | Comments

Public health agencies like the World Health Organization (WHO) and United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have started to appreciate the need for point-of-care and self-test diagnostics programs to help reach people...

Photos of the Day: HIV Self-Test Kit Ready for the World

October 16, 2014 8:30 am | by David Mantey, Editorial Director, ABM Design Group | News | Comments

After more than two-and-a-half years of development work and onsite testing, John Kelly, CEO of Sydney, Australia-based Atomo Diagnostics, believes that his company has developed the test platform, AtomoRapid, to address critical errors common...

The Future of Early Cancer Detection?

October 15, 2014 1:45 pm | by TED | Videos | Comments

Along with a crew of technologists and scientists, Jorge Soto is developing a simple, noninvasive, open-source test that looks for early signs of multiple forms of cancer. Onstage at TEDGlobal 2014, he demonstrates a working prototype of the mobile platform for the first time...

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New Test Offers Faster Check for Recent Illness Wave

October 15, 2014 1:40 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

For more than two months, health officials have been struggling to understand the size of a national wave of severe respiratory illnesses caused by an unusual virus. This week, they expect the wave to start looking a whole lot bigger. But that's because a new test will be speeding through a backlog of cases...

Enhancing Blood Biomarker Discovery for Better Disease Diagnostics

October 15, 2014 1:21 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health will fund work by a Purdue Research Park-based company to improve methods to screen blood plasma samples for biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a disease, to expedite diagnosis and treatment...

Breathalyzer Diagnoses Disease in Dolphins

October 15, 2014 12:58 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Alcohol consumption isn't the only thing a breath analysis can reveal. Scientists have been studying its possible use for diagnosing a wide range of conditions in humans — and now in the beloved bottlenose dolphin. In a report in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, one team describes a new instrument...

Charged Graphene Enables a Unique View of DNA During Sequencing

October 15, 2014 10:58 am | by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

When Illinois researchers set out to investigate a method to control how DNA moves through a tiny sequencing device, they did not know they were about to witness a display of molecular gymnastics. Fast, accurate and affordable DNA sequencing is the first step toward personalized medicine...

Biomarker Offers Diagnosis of Cancer Cause

October 15, 2014 10:50 am | by Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health | News | Comments

CLIP2 serves as a radiation marker: After exposure to radiation from radioiodine, both the genetic activity and the protein expression are increased, as the scientists' studies were able to substantiate. CLIP2 appears to be particularly significant...

Low-Cost, Disposable Lung Infection Detector Developed

October 15, 2014 10:33 am | by University of California - Irvine | News | Comments

Imagine a low-cost, disposable breath analysis device that a person with cystic fibrosis could use at home along with a smartphone to immediately detect a lung infection, much like the device police use to gauge a driver's blood alcohol level...

New York State: A Beacon for Bio/Med Growth

October 15, 2014 8:30 am | by Jessica Crawford, President, MedTech Association | Blogs | Comments

The Bio/Med Breakthroughs: Advancing New York’s Innovation Economy industry report by MedTech, the trade association for bioscience and medical technology (Bio/Med) companies in New York, which was launched at MEDTECH 2014, reveals a number...

FDA Approved Software Solution Offers Efficient Monitoring of Lung Cancer Treatment

October 14, 2014 3:15 pm | by Columbia University Medical Center | News | Comments

Columbia University’s imaging software that facilitates 3D lung tumor segmentation, licensed to Varian Medical Systems, has been incorporated into the Smart Segmentation module of Varian’s Eclipse treatment planning system and has received FDA...

Experimental Test Reveals Sinus Problems as Allergic, Viral or Bacterial Issue

October 14, 2014 3:09 pm | by Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science | News | Comments

It’s that time of the year where a perfect storm of fall allergies and cold and flu season will send hordes of sniffling sneezing sufferers to the doctor’s office. Currently, physicians don’t have a quick way to tell if sinus problems are allergic, viral...

FDA Seeks to Address Cybersecurity Challenges in Medical Devices

October 14, 2014 2:39 pm | by Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures, CDRH | Blogs | Comments

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers...

Sharing Data Could Lead to Better Healthcare

October 14, 2014 12:13 pm | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have been awarded a $9.2 million grant to help modernize and transform how researchers share, use, find and cite biomedical datasets. The 3-year project, a collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, is part of a federal initiative...

Measuring Snot Stickiness in the Interest of Treating Disease

October 14, 2014 10:58 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

Some people might consider mucus an icky bodily secretion best left wrapped in a tissue, but to a group of researchers, snot is an endlessly fascinating subject. The team has developed a way to use gold nanoparticles and light to measure the stickiness of the slimy substance that lines our airways...

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