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The Development of Mobile Apps in the Healthcare Industry

August 7, 2014 2:40 pm | by Sarah Peters, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The growth and development of smartphone technology has been phenomenal. In a very short space of time, we moved from very basic mobile phones that only allowed users to make calls, send SMS messages, and play a few simple games, to having...

How Animations Can Help Scientists Test a Hypothesis

August 7, 2014 1:58 pm | by TED | Videos | Comments

3D animation can bring scientific hypotheses to life. Molecular biologist (and TED Fellow) Janet Iwasa introduces a new open-source animation software designed just for scientists…           

Growing Human GI Cells May Lead to Personalized Treatments

August 7, 2014 12:11 pm | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Reporting online recently...

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The Pulse: Moving Fluids Across Open Surfaces and Visualizing the 3D Heart

August 7, 2014 11:54 am | by Jonathan Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re moving fluids across active surfaces, visualizing a beating heart in 3D, preventing drowsy drivers, and getting a better night’s rest.             

Researchers Find Infectious Prion Protein in Urine of Patients with Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

August 7, 2014 11:47 am | by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | News | Comments

The misfolded and infectious prion protein that is a marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease – linked to the consumption of infected cattle meat – has been detected in the urine of patients with the disease by researchers at The University...

Scientists Develop Nasal Test for Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 11:43 am | by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian...

Small Device Can Test for Ebola in 15 Minutes

August 7, 2014 10:59 am | by KTVU.com | Videos | Comments

Testing people for the Ebola virus can be an involved and lengthy process. But one Bay Area company  is developing a prototype that can test people on the spot and get results quickly. PositiveID says the device is designed to be used at...

Gut Microbiome Analysis Improved Noninvasive Colorectal Cancer Screening

August 7, 2014 10:48 am | by American Association for Cancer Research | News | Comments

Analysis of the gut microbiome more successfully distinguished healthy individuals from those with precancerous adenomatous polyps and those with invasive colorectal cancer compared with assessment of clinical risk factors and fecal occult...

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Brain Tumors Fly Under the Body's Radar Like Stealth Jets

August 7, 2014 10:31 am | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

Brain tumors fly under the radar of the body's defense forces by coating their cells with extra amounts of a specific protein, new research shows. Like a stealth fighter jet, the coating means the cells evade detection by the early-warning...

Infographic: What Engineers Think About Retirement

August 7, 2014 8:14 am | by Kasey Panetta & Eileen Whitmore, ECN Magazine | News | Comments

Retirement, that Golden Age of relaxation and hard-earned rest where you get to prop up your feet on the porch and yell at the neighborhood kids to get off your lawn. ECN wanted to know what engineers had planned for...    

Photos of the Day: Monitoring Disease Through Vapors

August 7, 2014 8:12 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

A new sensor, which can detect airborne chemicals either exhaled or released through the skin, would likely be the first wearable to pick up a broad array of chemical, rather than physical, attributes. U-M researchers are working with the National...

Wearable Tech for Disease Monitoring

August 7, 2014 8:12 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

A new wearable vapor sensor being developed at the University of Michigan could one day offer continuous disease monitoring for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia or lung disease. Wearable technologies, which include Google...

New Hand-Held Device Uses Lasers, Sound Waves for Deeper Melanoma Imaging

August 6, 2014 3:21 pm | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. The instrument, described in a paper published today...

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Motion Capture Software and Medical Innovation

August 6, 2014 2:35 pm | by Jeffrey Dawson, Health and Medicine Writer | Articles | Comments

The phrase “motion capture software” generally brings to mind blockbuster, special-effects-laden films or the latest high-tech mechanical simulation of the latest automobile prototype. However, motion capture software has been leaving its...

World's First Magnetic Particle Imaging Device

August 6, 2014 2:18 pm | by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) | News | Comments

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) is funding the world's first magnetic particle imaging (MPI) equipment. The MPI unit was formally handed over to Professor Dr. Gerhard Adam, Director of the Diagnostic and...

Medical App Competition During Medica 2014

August 6, 2014 2:13 pm | by Messe Düsseldorf | News | Comments

Developers of medical apps will have the opportunity to present their creations live at the App Competition during MEDICA 2014, World Forum for Medicine, to be held from November 12 – 15, 2014 at the fairgrounds in Düsseldorf, Germany. This...

Institutions Collaborate Toward Sharing and Standardizing Neuroscience Data

August 6, 2014 11:00 am | by The Kavli Foundation | News | Comments

This is the first collaboration launched by “Neurodata Without Borders,” a broader initiative with the goal of standardizing neuroscience data on an international scale, making it more easily sharable by researchers worldwide. This first...

New Tools Advance Bio-Logic

August 6, 2014 10:47 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Kansas Medical Center are making genetic circuits that can perform more complex tasks by swapping protein building blocks. The modular genetic circuits engineered from parts of otherwise...

Scientists Create Remote-Controlled Nanoscale Protein Motors

August 6, 2014 10:39 am | by Shara Tonn, Stanford | News | Comments

In every cell in your body, tiny protein motors are toiling away to keep you going. Moving muscles, dividing cells, twisting DNA – they are the workhorses of biology. But there is still uncertainty about how they function. To help biologists...

Butterflies Could Hold Key to Probes that Repair Genes

August 5, 2014 3:50 pm | by Clemson University | News | Comments

New discoveries about how butterflies feed could help engineers develop tiny probes that siphon liquid out of single cells for a wide range of medical tests and treatments, according to Clemson University researchers. The National Science...

3-in-1 Optical Skin Cancer Probe

August 5, 2014 3:42 pm | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

As thousands of vacationers hit the beach this summer, many of them will expose their unprotected bare limbs to direct UV sunlight, potentially putting them at risk of skin cancer later in life. To fight back, scientists can also turn to light...

World’s Smallest Propeller Could Be Used for Microscopic Medicine

August 5, 2014 2:54 pm | by Kevin Hattori, American Technion Society | News | Comments

If you thought that the most impressive news in shrinking technology these days was smart watches, think again. Scientists are quietly toiling in their laboratories to create robots that are only nanometers – billionths of a meter – in length...

Photos of the Day: Bottling Ultrasound Imaging

August 5, 2014 11:08 am | by DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a technique for generating acoustic bottles in open air that can bend the paths of sound waves along prescribed convex...

Bottling Up Sound Waves

August 5, 2014 11:03 am | by DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

There's a new wave of sound on the horizon carrying with it a broad scope of tantalizing potential applications, including advanced ultrasonic imaging and therapy, acoustic cloaking, and levitation and particle manipulation. Researchers with...

Surprise Discovery Could See Graphene Used to Improve Health

August 5, 2014 10:47 am | by Monash University | News | Comments

A chance discovery about the 'wonder material' graphene – already exciting scientists because of its potential uses in electronics, energy storage and energy generation – takes it a step closer to being used in medicine and human health...

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