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Genetic Screening Could Improve Breast Cancer Prevention

April 9, 2015 9:00 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

A test for a wide range of genetic risk factors could improve doctors' ability to work out which women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer, a major study of more than 65,000 women has shown. Improving the accuracy of risk analysis...

More on the Maker Movement – How Can You Get Involved?

April 8, 2015 2:19 pm | by TEDMED | Videos | Comments

You may have caught our Great Challenges hangout last week on how the Maker Movement is transforming health and medicine. During this discussion, we explored how this trend is impacting the everyday work of creating a healthier world...

The Pulse: Stroke Rehab Music Glove and Drawn-On Sensors

April 8, 2015 11:57 am | by Jon Dipierro, Sean Fenske, and Sam Brusco | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we're touching our music glove-clad fingers together in time for stroke rehab, penning biosensors, seizing a golden opportunity with cancer-targeting nanoparticles, and avoiding embarrassing accidents with a bowel...

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Watching the Blood Flow

April 8, 2015 10:49 am | by Journal of Biophotonics | News | Comments

Tape stripping is a commonly used method to increase the penetration depth of drug delivery. It has also been used to investigate the physiology of the stratum corneum (SC) as well as the kinetics and penetration depth of topical drugs...

90 Percent of Breast Cancers Can Be Detected with MRI

April 8, 2015 10:31 am | by Medical University of Vienna | News | Comments

Around 90 percent of all breast cancers can be definitively diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This compares to the combined methods of mammography and ultrasound which yielded a detection rate of just 37.5 percent. This is the...

Sensor Technology Helps Clinicians Improve Breast Exam Skills

April 8, 2015 8:53 am | by National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering | News | Comments

NIBIB-funded researchers have developed a highly effective sensor system to improve the quality of clinical breast examinations by physicians. The training system addresses a critical need for physicians to develop the technique and skill...

Self-Assembling, Bioinstructive Collagen Building Blocks

April 8, 2015 8:42 am | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A Purdue University researcher and entrepreneur is commercializing her laboratory's innovative collagen formulations that self-assemble or polymerize to form fibrils that resemble those found in the body's tissues. These collagen building blocks...

How Robots Can Help Build Better Doctors

April 7, 2015 3:11 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's...

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Recharging Medical Devices in a Minute

April 7, 2015 3:05 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to developing a portable medical device, one of the constant challenges for design engineers is determining a suitable power source. The list of concerns that can be associated with the battery in a medical device can include...

Office Inkjet Printer Could Identify Infectious Diseases

April 7, 2015 2:56 pm | by McMaster University | News | Comments

Consumers are one step closer to benefitting from packaging that could give simple text warnings when food is contaminated with deadly pathogens like E. coli and Salmonella, and patients could soon receive real-time diagnoses of infections such...

Detecting Rare Cancer Cells with Sound Waves

April 7, 2015 9:12 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Cancer cells often break free from their original locations and circulate through the bloodstream, allowing them to form new tumors elsewhere in the body. Detecting these cells could give doctors a new way to predict whether patients’ tumors will...

Putting the Safety of 'Magic Anti-Cancer Bullet' to the Test

April 6, 2015 10:44 am | by Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology | News | Comments

A group of MIPT researchers together with their colleagues from Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod, Australia and the Netherlands have carried out the first systematic study analyzing the safety of so-called upconversion nanoparticles that may be used to...

Hormone and Bone Tests May Indicate Dialysis Patients’ Heart Health

April 6, 2015 10:37 am | by American Society of Nephrology (ASN) | News | Comments

Bone loss may be a sign of poor heart health in patients on dialysis, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology(JASN). Monitoring bone loss in dialysis patients may therefore...

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Latest Advances in Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT

April 6, 2015 10:33 am | by European Society of Cardiology | News | Comments

The latest advances in nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging are set to be announced at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT (ICNC) 12. ICNC 12 will be held 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain, at the Hotel Auditorium...

Optics, Nanotechnology Combined Creates Low-Cost Gas Sensor

April 6, 2015 10:30 am | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers have combined innovative optical technology with nanocomposite thin-films to create a new type of sensor that is inexpensive, fast, highly sensitive and able to detect and analyze a wide range of gases. The technology might find...

$1 Gold Nanoparticle Test Outperforms Prostate Cancer PSA Screen

April 6, 2015 9:44 am | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

A test that costs less than a $1 and yields results in minutes has been shown in newly published studies to be more sensitive and more exact than the current standard test for early-stage prostate cancer. The simple test developed by University...

New Blood Test May Provide Earlier Parkinson's Diagnosis

April 6, 2015 9:37 am | by The Mount Sinai Hospital/Mount Sinai School of Medicine | News | Comments

A new blood test may more accurately identify blood signatures, or biomarkers, for Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a new study published in the journal Movement Disorders. The study, conducted by researchers at Mount Sinai and funded...

Blood Test Improves Early Pregnancy Down Syndrome Detection

April 2, 2015 2:53 pm | by University of California - San Francisco | News | Comments

A blood test undertaken between 10 to 14 weeks of pregnancy may be more effective in diagnosing Down syndrome and two other less common chromosomal abnormalities than standard non-invasive screening techniques, according to a multicenter...

Diagnosing Disease with a Smartphone

April 2, 2015 2:14 pm | by Florida Atlantic University | News | Comments

In much the same way that glucometers and pregnancy tests have revolutionized in-home diagnostic testing, researchers from Florida Atlantic University and collaborators have identified a new biosensing platform that could be used to remotely...

Parkinson's Diagnosis by Typing on a Keyboard

April 2, 2015 2:03 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Analyzing people’s keystrokes as they type on a computer keyboard can reveal a great deal of information about the state of their motor function, according to a new study from MIT. In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports, the researchers...

Rapid Imaging of Functions in Living Brain

April 2, 2015 10:30 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body’s tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, Lihong Wang, PhD, and his...

How Has Home Healthcare Technology Impacted Medical Device Manufacturers?

April 2, 2015 10:16 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

Currently, we are in the midst of a small healthcare revolution with medicine moving out of the hospitals and doctor's offices and into patients' homes. Innovations in technology are enabling more people to be treated, diagnosed, or monitored...

Blood Test Reveals Solid Tumor Presence

April 2, 2015 9:51 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

Thomas Jefferson University has announced a partnership with Exosome Sciences Inc. to evaluate a novel liquid biopsy platform that might offer clinicians new and actionable information about a patient’s cancer as the disease progresses...

Endoscopes Linked to Outbreak of Drug-Resistant E. coli

April 2, 2015 9:46 am | by Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America | News | Comments

An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded...

Turning the Smartphone into Star Trek’s Tricorder

April 2, 2015 9:40 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

For the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Star Trek's "Tricorder" was an essential tool, a multifunctional hand-held device used to sense, compute, and record data in a threatening and unpredictable universe. It simplified a number of Starfleet...

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