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Metabolic PET Imaging Provides Earlier Warning of Coronary Disease

June 11, 2013 10:56 am | by Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | News | Comments

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the world’s most prevalent and silent killers. Positron emission tomography (PET), which images miniscule abnormalities in cellular metabolism, can tip off clinicians about cardiac disasters waiting to happen—including sudden death from a heart attack—better than standard angiography, researchers revealed at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2013 Annual Meeting.

SPECT/MR Molecular Imaging System Makes Its Debut

June 11, 2013 10:43 am | by Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | News | Comments

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2013 Annual Meeting marks the unveiling of the successful application of a new preclinical hybrid molecular imaging system—single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance—which has exceptional molecular imaging capabilities in terms of potential preclinical and clinical applications, technological advancement at a lower cost, and reduction of patient exposure to radiation.

Screening Fails to Affect Breast Cancer Mortality Statistics

June 11, 2013 10:39 am | by SAGE Publications | News | Comments

New research analyzing breast cancer mortality data spanning almost 40 years concludes that breast cancer screening does not yet show an effect on mortality statistics. The research, published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, analyzed mortality trends before and after the introduction of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme in 1988.

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The Diabetes ‘Breathalyzer’

June 11, 2013 10:14 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Chemists at the University of Pittsburgh have demonstrated a sensor technology that could significantly simplify the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes through breath analysis alone. Their findings were published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).

The Body Electric: Researchers Move Closer to Low-Cost, Implantable Electronics

June 11, 2013 10:09 am | by The Ohio State University | News | Comments

New technology under development at The Ohio State University is paving the way for low-cost electronic devices that work in direct contact with living tissue inside the body. The first planned use of the technology is a sensor that will detect the very early stages of organ transplant rejection.

Coating for Consumption

June 10, 2013 2:19 pm | by Lonny Wolgemuth, Sr. Medical Market Specialist, and Juan Gudino, Medical Market Manager, Specialty Coating Systems | Specialty Coating Systems | Articles | Comments

Ingestible medical devices offer a convenient, non-invasive method of delivering therapeutics, enabling diagnostic procedures, or performing imaging tasks. However, ensuring that the sensitive electronics within the device are protected is a challenge. This article will highlight a coating technology that is being used to guarantee such protection is provided.

Meridian Bioscience Receives FDA Clearance for New Molecular Amplification Test: illumigene® Mycoplasma

June 10, 2013 10:30 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio (NASDAQ: VIVO) today announced that it has received FDA clearance for a new molecular diagnostic test for Mycoplasma pneumonia ( M. pneumoniae ), its fourth assay on the illumi gene platform. This innovative test that aids in identifying an important respiratory pathogen is a strong addition to the illumi gene platform.

3-D Map of Blood Vessels in Cerebral Cortex Holds Surprises

June 10, 2013 10:09 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Blood vessels within a sensory area of the mammalian brain loop and connect in unexpected ways, a new map has revealed. The study, published June 9 in the early online edition of Nature Neuroscience, describes vascular architecture within a well-known region of the cerebral cortex and explores what that structure means for functional imaging of the brain and the onset of a kind of dementia.

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MRI Detects Early Effects of Chemotherapy on Children's Hearts

June 10, 2013 10:07 am | by BioMed Central | News | Comments

MRI scans of children who have had chemotherapy can detect early changes in their hearts finds research in biomed Central's open access journal Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. Chemotherapy with anthracyclines, such as Doxorubicin, is one of the most effective treatments against many types of cancer, including leukaemia and Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast, lung, and ovarian cancer.

Women Can Be Screened Years Later than Men with 'Virtual Colonoscopy'

June 10, 2013 10:05 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

A new study has found that women can be screened for colorectal cancer at least five to 10 years later than men when undergoing an initial "virtual colonoscopy." Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help establish guidelines for the use of this screening technique, which is less invasive than a traditional colonoscopy.

3 Out of 20 Scopes Used to Examine GI Tracts and Colons Improperly Cleaned

June 7, 2013 10:42 am | by Association for Professionals in Infection Control | News | Comments

Three out of 20 flexible gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes used for screening were found to harbor unacceptable levels of "bio dirt" – cells and matter from a patient's body that could pose potential infection risk -- according to a study of endoscopes used at five hospitals across the U.S.

Biomarker Identification May Lead to New Noninvasive Test for Colorectal Cancer Detection

June 7, 2013 10:39 am | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

The average 5-year survival for colorectal cancer is less than 10% if metastasis occurs, but can reach 90% if detected early. A new non-invasive test has been developed that measures methylation of the SDC2 gene in tissues and blood sera. This test detected 87% of all stages of colorectal cancer cases (sensitivity) without significant difference between early and advanced stages.

Non-Invasive First Trimester Blood Test Reliably Detects Down's Syndrome

June 7, 2013 10:37 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

New research has found that routine screening using a non-invasive test that analyzes fetal DNA in a pregnant woman's blood can accurately detect Down's syndrome and other genetic fetal abnormalities in the first trimester. Published early online in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the results suggest that the test is superior to currently available screening strategies and could reshape standards in prenatal testing.

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Math Technique De-Clutters Cancer-Cell Data, Revealing Tumor Evolution, Treatment Leads

June 7, 2013 10:14 am | by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory | News | Comments

Today, two scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) publish a mathematical method of simplifying and interpreting genome data bearing evidence of mutations, such as those that characterize specific cancers. Not only is the technique highly accurate; it has immediate utility in efforts to parse tumor cells, in order to determine a patient's prognosis and the best approach to treatment.

Neuroimaging May Offer New Way to Diagnose Bipolar Disorder

June 6, 2013 11:52 am | by Mount Sinai School of Medicine | News | Comments

MRI may be an effective way to diagnose mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, according to experts from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. In a landmark study using advanced techniques, the researchers were able to correctly distinguish bipolar patients from healthy individuals based on their brain scans alone. The data are published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

Data Mining EMRs Can Detect Bad Drug Reactions

June 6, 2013 11:15 am | by New Jersey Institute of Technology | News | Comments

NJIT Assistant Professor Mei Liu, PhD, a computer scientist, has recently shown in a new study that electronic medical records can validate previously reported adverse drug reactions and report new ones. "EMRs have created an unprecedented resource for observational studies since they contain not only detailed patient information, but also large amounts of longitudinal clinical data," she said.

Seattle Children’s Hospital Chooses IBM Big Data Technology for Faster, More Accurate Diagnoses

June 6, 2013 5:05 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and Brightlight today announced that Seattle Children’s Hospital is using IBM Big Data technology to improve treatment of its young patients. With over 350,000 patient visits annually and thousands of data points associated with each patient, Seattle Children’s Hospital can run queries on patient data in seconds, rather than minutes, to provide quicker, more effective care and diagnosis.

Impact of Portable Medical Devices

June 5, 2013 3:27 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor, ECN | Articles | Comments

The portable medical devices industry is a fast growing world. With the advent of various smart technology and wireless capabilities, this medical field has become one of the most intriguing with the promise of great potential for future healthcare.

The Rise of Mobile Health and the Importance of Human Factors

June 5, 2013 2:23 pm | by Laurie Reed, Senior Human Factors Engineer, Farm | Farm | Blogs | Comments

Human factors engineering, as applied to the design of medical devices, has never been as important as it is today, especially since the release of the U.S. FDA’s draft guidance document Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize Medical Device Design. With the rise of mobile health apps, human factors engineering principles will become even more vital to the success of this industry and to the safety of the patients.

UMSL Biochemists Develop New Technology to Transfer DNA into Cells

June 5, 2013 11:21 am | by Myra Lopez, University of Missouri–St. Louis | News | Comments

Much of Atkins and Patel’s research centers on ion channels – proteins that act as pores within cell membranes and enable electrical currents to pass in and out of cells. They recently developed new technology to transfer DNA into cells. The development is an inexpensive and non-toxic method to help DNA cross the cell membrane so that cells can be modified.

Will Connected Health Save the Healthcare Industry?

June 4, 2013 3:07 pm | by Ralph Hugeneck, Director of Medical Technology, and Gary Baker, Marketing Communications Manager, Jabil Healthcare & Life Sciences | Jabil | Blogs | Comments

The medical device ecosystem is changing dramatically from stand-alone “device + patient + physician” in the clinical environment to include access and mobility outside the four walls of the hospital. Every medical device manufacturer should consider developing a strategy around how mobile connected health will affect their business models and how they will play in the evolution of the market.

Transparent Electrode Enables Electronics on Contact Lens

June 4, 2013 12:10 pm | by Eunhee Song, UNIST | News | Comments

A hybrid transparent and stretchable electrode could open the new way for flexible displays, solar cells, and even electronic devices fitted on a curvature substrate such as soft eye contact lenses, by the UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology) research team.

Detecting Disease with a Smartphone Accessory

June 4, 2013 11:36 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

As drugs that treat HIV have become more common, the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma has decreased in the U.S. The disease, however, remains prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where poor access to medical care and lab tests only compound the problem. Now, Cornell engineers have created a smartphone-based system, consisting of a plug-in optical accessory and disposable microfluidic chips, for detection of the herpes virus that causes Kaposi's.

Altered Neural Circuitry May Lead to Anorexia and Bulimia

June 4, 2013 10:10 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

A landmark study, with first author Tyson Oberndorfer, MD, and led by Walter H. Kaye, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that the altered function of neural circuitry contributes to restricted eating in anorexia and overeating in bulimia.

Technique Could Identify Patients at High Risk of Stroke or Brain Hemorrhage

June 4, 2013 10:07 am | by Nationwide Children’s Hospital | News | Comments

Measuring blood flow in the brain may be an easy, noninvasive way to predict stroke or hemorrhage in children receiving cardiac or respiratory support through a machine called ECMO, according to a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Early detection would allow physicians to alter treatment and take steps to prevent these complications—the leading cause of death for patients on ECMO.

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