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Techne to Buy Bionostics for $104M in Cash

June 18, 2013 1:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Techne, which makes medical testing and diagnostic products, said Tuesday that it reached a deal to buy Bionostics Holdings Ltd. and its operating subsidiary Bionostics Inc. for $104 million in cash.             

New Nanoneedle Helping Scientists Uncover Secrets Under the Skin

June 14, 2013 9:22 am | by University of Bath | News | Comments

Researchers in the University’s Physics and Pharmacy & Pharmacology Departments are using a pioneering technique to study the properties and characteristics of our skin, in tests that could pave the way for new treatments for dermatitis, and for an improved understanding of the skin ageing process.

Autonomous, Energy-Scavenging, Micro Devices Serve as Biomedical Monitors

June 14, 2013 9:10 am | by SPIE | News | Comments

Out in the wilds or anywhere off the grid, sophisticated instruments small enough to fit in a shirt pocket will one day scavenge power from sunlight, body heat, or other sources to monitor water quality or bridge safety or function as wearable biomedical monitors, enabling analysis in the field rather than bringing samples and data back to the lab.

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Testing Method Promising for Spinal Cord Injuries, Multiple Sclerosis

June 14, 2013 9:00 am | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A medical test previously developed to measure a toxin found in tobacco smokers has been adapted to measure the same toxin in people suffering from spinal cord injuries and multiple sclerosis, offering a potential tool to reduce symptoms.

Court Says Human Genes Cannot Be Patented

June 13, 2013 4:13 pm | by Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press Writer | News | Comments

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that companies cannot patent parts of naturally-occurring human genes, a decision with the potential to profoundly affect the emerging and lucrative medical and biotechnology industries. The high court's unanimous judgment reverses three decades of patent awards by government officials.

The Scent of Melanoma

June 13, 2013 4:05 pm | by Monell Chemical Senses Center | News | Comments

According to new research from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions, odors from human skin cells can be used to identify melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. In addition to detecting a unique odor signature associated with melanoma cells, the researchers also demonstrated that a nanotechnology-based sensor could reliably differentiate melanoma cells from normal skin cells.

Supreme Court Ruling Today Allows DNATraits to Offer Low Cost BRCA Breast and Ovarian Cancer Gene Testing in U.S.

June 13, 2013 2:09 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Thanks to today's U.S. Supreme Court decision opening the door to greater access to genetic medicine by American patients and their health care providers, testing for genes specifically linked to breast, ovarian and other cancers will now be more widely available and at a lower cost than ever before.

UF Study Finds Brain-Imaging Technique Can Help Diagnose Movement Disorders

June 13, 2013 11:15 am | by University of Florida | News | Comments

A new University of Florida study suggests a promising brain-imaging technique has the potential to improve diagnoses for the millions of people with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. Utilizing the diffusion tensor imaging technique, as it is known, could allow clinicians to assess people earlier, leading to improved treatment interventions and therapies for patients.

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Discovery of New Material State Counterintuitive to Laws of Physics

June 13, 2013 10:51 am | by Tona Kunz, Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

When you squeeze something, it gets smaller. Unless you’re at Argonne National Laboratory. At the suburban Chicago laboratory, a group of scientists has seemingly defied the laws of physics and found a way to apply pressure to make a material expand instead of compress/contract.

Newly Identified Markers May Predict Who Will Respond to Breast Cancer Prevention Therapy

June 13, 2013 10:00 am | by AACR | News | Comments

Genetic variations, known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in or near the genes ZNF423 and CTSO were associated with breast cancer risk among women who underwent prevention therapy with tamoxifen and raloxifene, according to data published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The Pulse: New Interface Rewires Nerves from Amputated Limbs

June 13, 2013 9:43 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, rewired nerves from amputated limbs allow for prosthetic control with existing muscles, a bioengineered blood vessel is transplanted, diabetes is diagnosed through breath analysis alone, and a new technology is paving the way for low-cost electronic devices that work in direct contact with living tissue inside the body.

Nanofiber Sensor Detects Diabetes or Lung Cancer Faster and Easier

June 12, 2013 10:52 am | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Today's technological innovation enables smartphone users to diagnose serious diseases such as diabetes or lung cancer quickly and effectively by simply breathing into a small gadget, a nanofiber breathing sensor, mounted on the phones. Il-Doo Kim, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Department at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology...

Exhaled Breath Sensor for Diagnosis of Diabetes Using Platinum-Loaded SnO2 Nanofibers

June 12, 2013 10:48 am | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology | Videos | Comments

Professor Il-Doo Kim of Materials Science & Engineering, KAIST, developed an exhaled breath sensor that is composed of highly porous tin dioxide (SnO2) nanofibers with a unique nanostructure functionalized by catalytic platinum (Pt) particles. This unique structure reacts to acetone gas, which is known as a biomarker of diabetes, for the fast diagnosis of the disease within 10 seconds.

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Diagnostics: A Focus on Imaging, Portability, and Regulations

June 11, 2013 3:59 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor, ECN | Articles | Comments

Diagnostic technology covers a broad range of equipment, tests, and medical fields, and recent advancements in technique and materials means that innovations are widespread and growing rapidly. Though economic conditions are preventing huge advancements in diagnostic imaging—if hospitals can’t afford the new technology, there is no point in designing it—the medical imaging community is focusing on refinement, rather than redesign.

Study Shows Cardiac MRI Use Reduces Adverse Events for Patients with Acute Chest Pain

June 11, 2013 11:01 am | by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | News | Comments

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center doctors have found that using stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in an Emergency Department observation unit to care for patients with acute chest pain is a win-win - for the patient and the institution.

Heart to Heart: Cardiac PET/MR Measures Up To PET/CT

June 11, 2013 10:59 am | by Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | News | Comments

Just a few years ago, integrated positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging was found only in research institutes, but little by little the technology has expanded into clinical practice. This is especially true for cardiac indications, for which the highly sensitive soft tissue contrast of MR and the functional and metabolic imaging of PET are particularly valuable.

Metabolic PET Imaging Provides Earlier Warning of Coronary Disease

June 11, 2013 10:56 am | by Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | News | Comments

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the world’s most prevalent and silent killers. Positron emission tomography (PET), which images miniscule abnormalities in cellular metabolism, can tip off clinicians about cardiac disasters waiting to happen—including sudden death from a heart attack—better than standard angiography, researchers revealed at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2013 Annual Meeting.

SPECT/MR Molecular Imaging System Makes Its Debut

June 11, 2013 10:43 am | by Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging | News | Comments

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2013 Annual Meeting marks the unveiling of the successful application of a new preclinical hybrid molecular imaging system—single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance—which has exceptional molecular imaging capabilities in terms of potential preclinical and clinical applications, technological advancement at a lower cost, and reduction of patient exposure to radiation.

Screening Fails to Affect Breast Cancer Mortality Statistics

June 11, 2013 10:39 am | by SAGE Publications | News | Comments

New research analyzing breast cancer mortality data spanning almost 40 years concludes that breast cancer screening does not yet show an effect on mortality statistics. The research, published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, analyzed mortality trends before and after the introduction of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme in 1988.

The Diabetes ‘Breathalyzer’

June 11, 2013 10:14 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Chemists at the University of Pittsburgh have demonstrated a sensor technology that could significantly simplify the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes through breath analysis alone. Their findings were published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).

The Body Electric: Researchers Move Closer to Low-Cost, Implantable Electronics

June 11, 2013 10:09 am | by The Ohio State University | News | Comments

New technology under development at The Ohio State University is paving the way for low-cost electronic devices that work in direct contact with living tissue inside the body. The first planned use of the technology is a sensor that will detect the very early stages of organ transplant rejection.

Coating for Consumption

June 10, 2013 2:19 pm | by Lonny Wolgemuth, Sr. Medical Market Specialist, and Juan Gudino, Medical Market Manager, Specialty Coating Systems | Specialty Coating Systems | Articles | Comments

Ingestible medical devices offer a convenient, non-invasive method of delivering therapeutics, enabling diagnostic procedures, or performing imaging tasks. However, ensuring that the sensitive electronics within the device are protected is a challenge. This article will highlight a coating technology that is being used to guarantee such protection is provided.

Meridian Bioscience Receives FDA Clearance for New Molecular Amplification Test: illumigene® Mycoplasma

June 10, 2013 10:30 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio (NASDAQ: VIVO) today announced that it has received FDA clearance for a new molecular diagnostic test for Mycoplasma pneumonia ( M. pneumoniae ), its fourth assay on the illumi gene platform. This innovative test that aids in identifying an important respiratory pathogen is a strong addition to the illumi gene platform.

3-D Map of Blood Vessels in Cerebral Cortex Holds Surprises

June 10, 2013 10:09 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Blood vessels within a sensory area of the mammalian brain loop and connect in unexpected ways, a new map has revealed. The study, published June 9 in the early online edition of Nature Neuroscience, describes vascular architecture within a well-known region of the cerebral cortex and explores what that structure means for functional imaging of the brain and the onset of a kind of dementia.

MRI Detects Early Effects of Chemotherapy on Children's Hearts

June 10, 2013 10:07 am | by BioMed Central | News | Comments

MRI scans of children who have had chemotherapy can detect early changes in their hearts finds research in biomed Central's open access journal Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. Chemotherapy with anthracyclines, such as Doxorubicin, is one of the most effective treatments against many types of cancer, including leukaemia and Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast, lung, and ovarian cancer.

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