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Technique Could Identify Patients at High Risk of Stroke or Brain Hemorrhage

June 4, 2013 10:07 am | by Nationwide Children’s Hospital | News | Comments

Measuring blood flow in the brain may be an easy, noninvasive way to predict stroke or hemorrhage in children receiving cardiac or respiratory support through a machine called ECMO, according to a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Early detection would allow physicians to alter treatment and take steps to prevent these complications—the leading cause of death for patients on ECMO.

Alzheimer's Leaves Clues in Blood

June 4, 2013 10:04 am | by Kaizo | News | Comments

Alzheimer researchers in Spain have taken a step closer to finding a blood test to help in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. With approximately 75% of the estimated 36 million Alzheimer's sufferers worldwide yet to receive a reliable diagnosis, the potential impact on the lives of possible sufferers, present and future, could be huge.

Medical Technologies: The Ones to Watch

June 3, 2013 12:33 pm | by Kevin Bottomley, Managing Director, Results Healthcare | Blogs | Comments

The growth in sales of medical technologies is set to outperform prescription medicines over the coming five years. Data from Evaluate Medtech indicates that over the period 2011 to 2018, the overall global compound annual growth rate for the sector will be 4.4%, in contrast to just 2.5% for drug products.

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Vinegar Cancer Test Saves Lives, India Study Finds

June 3, 2013 11:25 am | by Marilynn Marchione and Muneeza Naqvi, Associated Press | News | Comments

A simple vinegar test slashed cervical cancer death rates by one-third in a remarkable study of 150,000 women in the slums of India, where the disease is the top cancer killer of women. Doctors reported the results Sunday at a cancer conference in Chicago.

Printing Innovations Provide 10-Fold Improvement in Organic Electronics

June 3, 2013 9:49 am | by DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Through innovations to a printing process, researchers have made major improvements to organic electronics – a technology in demand for lightweight, low-cost solar cells, flexible electronic displays and tiny sensors. The printing method is fast and works with a variety of organic materials to produce semiconductors of strikingly higher quality than what has so far been achieved with similar methods.

Distributing Healthcare

May 31, 2013 3:20 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

One of the most interesting things about my position is seeing the changes in one of the most dynamic industries around—the medical device industry (and, in a broader sense, the healthcare industry). In my 13+ years of reporting on this industry, I’ve seen many changes and technological advances. It truly is remarkable to think about how far certain sectors of the industry have come in what is really a very short period of time.

New Single Virus Detection Techniques for Faster Disease Diagnosis

May 31, 2013 12:11 pm | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

Two independent teams have developed new optics-based methods for determining the exact viral load of a sample by counting individual virus particles. These new methods are faster and cheaper than standard tests and they offer the potential to conduct the measurements in a medical office or hospital instead of a laboratory.

Photo of the Day: Will Connected Health Save the Healthcare Industry?

May 31, 2013 11:55 am | by Jabil | Jabil | News | Comments

The medical device ecosystem is changing dramatically from stand-alone “device + patient + physician” in the clinical environment to include access and mobility outside the four walls of the hospital. This inforgraphic looks at how connected health can make an impact on the cost of healthcare.

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New Method to Test Breast Lesions Could Better Detect Cancer, Save Money by Reducing Repeat Biopsies

May 31, 2013 12:05 am | by AACR | News | Comments

A newly developed, single-step Raman spectroscopy algorithm has the potential to simultaneously detect microcalcifications and enable diagnosis of the associated breast lesions with high precision, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Researchers Identify Novel Approach to Create Red Blood Cells, Platelets In Vitro

May 30, 2013 4:29 pm | by Boston University Medical Center | News | Comments

A study led by Boston University School of Medicine has identified a novel approach to create an unlimited number of human red blood cells and platelets in vitro. In collaboration with Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Boston Medical Center (BMC), the researchers differentiated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into these cell types, which are typically obtained through blood donations.

Worldwide Lecture Tour Touts Point-of-Care Healthcare

May 30, 2013 4:19 pm | by New Jersey Institute of Technology | News | Comments

NJIT Distinguished Professor and electrical engineer Atam Dhawan hits the lecture trail again this summer as a distinguished speaker for an IEEE life sciences lecture series. His focus will be how "Point of Care Healthcare" can reduce illness, improve the quality of life, and stop spiraling healthcare costs. Dhawan, who will stop at conferences in Japan, Colombia and Croatia, tells audiences about the following.

Home Healthcare and Home-Use Medical Device Design

May 30, 2013 3:14 pm | by Kristina Bosland, Sr. Human Factors Engineer, Farm Design | Farm | Blogs | Comments

Home healthcare and the use of medical devices outside of the professional healthcare environment are on the rise. Modern medicine allows us to live longer and provides those with chronic diseases the ability to receive medical care at home. Examples of home-use devices are oxygen concentrators, hospital beds, sleep apnea monitors, body-worn nerve and muscle stimulators, and dialysis machines, just to name a few.

A New Kind of Chemical ‘Glue’

May 30, 2013 11:20 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Over the past three decades, researchers have found various applications of a method for attaching molecules to gold; the approach uses chemicals called thiols to bind the materials together. But while this technique has led to useful devices for electronics, sensing and nanotechnology, it has limitations. Now, an MIT team has found a new material that could overcome many of these limitations.

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Charred Micro-Bunny Sculpture Shows Promise of New Material For 3-D Shaping

May 30, 2013 10:36 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

Japanese scientists, using a new material that can be molded into complex, highly conductive 3-D structures with features just a few micrometers across, are able to create shapes the size of a typical bacterium. Combined with state-of-the-art micro-sculpting techniques, the new resin holds promise for making customized electrodes for fuel cells or batteries, as well as biosensor interfaces for medical uses.

Uscom to Acquire New Zealand-based Pulsecor and New Blood Pressure Products

May 30, 2013 3:18 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Uscom (ASX: UCM) Uscom Limited today signed a deed to acquire all assets of Pulsecor Limited. Pulsecor Limited is a New Zealand company which has developed novel non-invasive central blood pressure measurement methods pioneered at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York.

Medical Device Technology: Our Best Hope for Delivering Global Healthcare

May 29, 2013 11:36 am | by Simon Karger, Associate Director, Surgical & Interventional, Cambridge Consultants | Blogs | Comments

The technology at the heart of the next generation of medical devices is critical to our ability to offer comprehensive care in the coming decades. While our current systems of care have served us well thus far, they are crumbling under the pressures of modern expectations of care, economics, scale, and the sheer breadth of medical science.

Charlotte Based Compression And Vacuum Therapy Technology Helps Train Cyclist In Race Across America

May 29, 2013 11:30 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Austrian Cyclist Gerald Bauer will be directly benefiting from Charlotte based HYPOXI therapy and equipment to give him a possible racing edge in the Race Across America. Gerald will specifically use the Charlotte HYPOXI Multispectrum S120 device one week prior to the race and each day after the race. Dr. Fedor Fomin of HYPOXI will be providing the therapy.

The Analysis of Medical Images Is Improved to Facilitate the Study of Psychotic Disorders

May 29, 2013 10:00 am | by UPNA/NUP-Public University of Navarre | News | Comments

A team of researchers from the UPNA/NUP-Public University of Navarre has developed new super resolution and segmentation methods for magnetic resonance images so that they can be applied to the structural study of psychosis. The aim is to be able to identify the differences that are produced in specific parts of the brain in psychotic patients with respect to their healthy relatives or other people.

New Diagnostic Technology May Lead to Individualized Treatments for Prostate Cancer

May 29, 2013 9:35 am | by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center | News | Comments

A research team jointly led by scientists from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the University of California, Los Angeles, have enhanced a device they developed to identify and "grab" circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, that break away from cancers and enter the blood, often leading to the spread of cancer to other parts of the body.

Global Ultrasound Market to Climb in Next Few Years, Thanks to Emerging Markets

May 29, 2013 9:32 am | by IMS Research | News | Comments

The global ultrasound market is forecast to grow by 27 percent over the next five years despite ongoing economic challenges, with emerging healthcare markets key to sustaining future global growth, according to a new report entitled “The World Market for Ultrasound Imaging Equipment – 2013” from IMS Research, now part of IHS Inc. (NYSE: IHS).

Advanced Paper Could be Foundation for Inexpensive Biomedical and Diagnostic Devices

May 29, 2013 9:29 am | by John Toon, Georgia Tech | News | Comments

Paper is known for its ability to absorb liquids, making it ideal for products such as paper towels. But by modifying the underlying network of cellulose fibers, etching off surface “fluff” and applying a thin chemical coating, researchers have created a new type of paper that repels a wide variety of liquids – including water and oil.

FDA Approves Blood Test to Diagnose Diabetes

May 28, 2013 10:56 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it approved a new blood test from Roche to help doctors diagnose diabetes. The Cobas Integra 800 is a blood test that measures a patient's average blood sugar level over the previous three months. In particular, the test measures an oxygen-carrying blood component known as hemoglobin.

Full Spectrum Endoscopy Procedure Reduces 'Miss Rate'

May 28, 2013 10:16 am | by EndoChoice | News | Comments

Although colonoscopy exams prevent many colon cancer deathsand are considered the most sensitive method for detecting colorectal cancers, the procedure is not completely effective in preventing cancer cases. EndoChoice has unveiled research that shows that its new Fuse system significantly improves the accuracy of this procedure and greatly reduces the number of adenomas missed by colonoscopists.

Nephosity’s MobileCT Viewer Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Diagnostic Image Viewing on iPads

May 24, 2013 10:55 am | by Nephosity | News | Comments

Nephosity, a digital health startup that was a member of Rock Health’s second class, has received clearance from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for their MobileCT Viewer, a software application for diagnostic image viewing on the iPad.

A Mobile Collaborative Radiology App

May 24, 2013 10:54 am | by Nephosity | Videos | Comments

In this video, a representative at Nephosity demonstrates MobileCT, an app for mobile collaborative teleradiology. It allows for a user (such as a doctor or patient) to use their mobile devices to view x-rays, MRIs, etc., and to collaborate with other users (such as other doctors or relatives).

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