Advertisement
Drug Delivery
Subscribe to Drug Delivery

The Lead

Innovations Could Feed the Hungry, Streamline Drug Production

October 31, 2014 10:33 am | by Kaylie Duffy, Associate Editor, Product Design & Development | News | Comments

The winners included a unique genetic sequence that could allow researchers to produce multiple proteins from a lone strand of mRNA. The sequence, a form of internal ribosome entry site (IRES), was found in the wheat virus Triticum moscaic by ...

Eviva PSU Polymer for Implantable Brain Shunts

October 31, 2014 8:30 am | by Solvay Specialty Polymers | Articles | Comments

Implantable brain shunt valves and access ports from France-based Sophysa, a leading...

Tiny Carbon Nanotube Pores Make Big Impact

October 30, 2014 10:24 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on...

Better Chemotherapy through Targeted Delivery

October 29, 2014 3:16 pm | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Every year, about 100,000 Americans are diagnosed with brain tumors that have spread from...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

New Technology Shows Promise for Delivery of Therapeutics to the Brain

October 29, 2014 12:29 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. According to the authors, the current medical use of chemotherapy...

Remote-Controlled Drug Delivery in Space

October 27, 2014 9:54 am | by Houston Methodist Research Institute | News | Comments

Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists will receive about $1.25 million from the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to develop an implantable device that delivers therapeutic drugs at a rate guided by remote control...

Engineering Nano-Sized Microfibers for Tissue Engineering and Biosensors

October 24, 2014 2:27 pm | by New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering | News | Comments

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create...

Advertisement

Battling Brain Tumors with Toxin-Secreting Stem Cells

October 24, 2014 2:00 pm | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, MS, PhD, who recently demonstrated the value of stem...

Diamonds Offer Potential for Enhanced Imaging, Drug Delivery

October 24, 2014 10:34 am | by Cardiff University | News | Comments

Nanodiamonds are very small particles (a thousand times smaller than human hair) and because of their low toxicity they can be used as a carrier to transport drugs inside cells. They also show huge promise as an alternative to the organic...

NFC Power in a Pin-Sized Package

October 23, 2014 3:11 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

In a recent blog, I highlighted a rapidly charging battery technology that was being developed for electric vehicles, but would certainly have applications in the medical device space as well. Unfortunately, that technology is not here yet, and...

Thermosponges Soak up Proteins for Drug Delivery

October 22, 2014 9:41 am | by Brigham and Women's Hospital | News | Comments

A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed and tested a novel nanoparticle platform that efficiently delivers clinically important proteins in vivo in initial proof-of-concept tests. Nanoparticles, which are particles measuring nanometers...

Students Sharpen Research Skills with the FDA

October 17, 2014 3:49 pm | by Nysia George, Ph.D., Intern Program Coordinator, and Tom Powers, Communication Officer; National Center for Toxicological Research | Blogs | Comments

Biology. Chemistry. Bioinformatics. Toxicology. Practical, hands-on laboratory work is important for all college students who want to become scientists — but, for many of them, such experiences are out of reach. That’s one of the reasons why every...

Advertisement

Recharging Medical Devices Faster…MUCH Faster

October 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to portable electronics, the power source can often be the biggest challenge for a designer attempting to reduce the size of a device. Batteries are typically the largest component in the device design. When it comes to medical devices...

World’s Thinnest Electric Generator Could Power Wearable Medtech

October 17, 2014 10:09 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology have reported the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), resulting in...

Attacking Deep Cancer Tumors with Light

October 16, 2014 10:40 am | by Jim Fessenden, UMass Medical School Communications | News | Comments

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo...

The Pulse: Robotic Spoon Feeding and Watching You Sleep

October 16, 2014 10:28 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re feeding the disabled with a robotic spoon, fighting DME with an implant in the eye, improving restfulness by watching you sleep, and evaluating head impacts in real time. Robotic Spoon Feeds Disabled:...

New York State: A Beacon for Bio/Med Growth

October 15, 2014 8:30 am | by Jessica Crawford, President, MedTech Association | Blogs | Comments

The Bio/Med Breakthroughs: Advancing New York’s Innovation Economy industry report by MedTech, the trade association for bioscience and medical technology (Bio/Med) companies in New York, which was launched at MEDTECH 2014, reveals a number...

Advertisement

Device to Enable Pain-Free Injections

October 14, 2014 3:42 pm | by American Society of Anesthesiologists | News | Comments

Imagine no tears during infant vaccines and no fear of the needle for those old enough to know what’s coming. Such painless injections could be possible with a device that applies pressure and vibration while the needle is inserted in the skin...

FDA Seeks to Address Cybersecurity Challenges in Medical Devices

October 14, 2014 2:39 pm | by Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures, CDRH | Blogs | Comments

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers...

Innovative Force-Sensing System Enables Microrobots to Study Cells

October 13, 2014 3:11 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Inexpensive microrobots capable of probing and manipulating individual cells and tissue for biological research and medical applications are closer to reality with the design of a system that senses the minute forces exerted by a robot's tiny probe. Microrobots small enough to interact with cells already exist...

Gaming Through Clinical Trials

October 13, 2014 2:41 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

Recently, I saw a news piece out of Carnegie Mellon University where researchers supported the use of “video game” style trials of life science hypotheses to prevent the instance of error and fraud. Massive online laboratories would be established...

Bio-Inspired ‘Nano-Cocoons’ Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells

October 13, 2014 11:53 am | by NC State University | News | Comments

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a drug delivery system consisting of nanoscale “cocoons” made of DNA that target cancer cells and trick the cells into absorbing the cocoon before unleashing anticancer drugs. "This drug delivery...

Biocoating Prevents Blood from Clotting on Implantables

October 13, 2014 11:42 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten...

First Drug-Coated Angioplasty Balloon Catheter Approved by FDA

October 13, 2014 9:06 am | by U.S. Food and Drug Administration | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Lutonix 035 Drug Coated Balloon Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Catheter. This is the first drug-coated balloon used to re-open arteries in the thigh and knee when narrowed or blocked as a result of peripheral artery disease...

Enhancing Drug Delivery Through the Skin

October 10, 2014 10:25 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Southampton have identified key characteristics that enhance a nanoparticle's ability to penetrate skin, in a milestone study which could have major implications for the delivery of drugs. Nanoparticles are up...

Implantable Medical Devices that Dissolve When No Longer Needed

October 10, 2014 9:53 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Electronic devices that dissolve completely in water, leaving behind only harmless end products, are part of a rapidly emerging class of technology pioneered by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Early results demonstrate...

Innovative Delivery Design Could Lead to Do-It-Yourself Flu Vaccinations

October 8, 2014 3:25 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Do-it-yourself flu vaccine? It could happen. Military folks who squirted vaccine up their noses were as well-protected as others who got it from health workers, a study found. There's no reason civilians couldn't do the same, especially for...

From Wearables to Implantables to…What’s Next?

October 8, 2014 9:39 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

Some time has passed since the Apple announcement of the company’s “iWatch” (at least as of the time I’m writing this) and all the pomp and circumstance that goes along with it. Unfortunately, from the mobile healthcare aspect, it was underwhelming...

Glucose Control - Both a Challenge and an Opportunity in MedTech

October 8, 2014 8:30 am | by Emily L. Cross, Ph.D, Director of Media and Communication, TecMed, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

In a 2009 educational presentation Dr. Alia Rizvi, a medical scholar-practitioner from the University Of South Carolina School Of Medicine reported that glucose control in the hospital, in-patient outcomes, and overall cost of patient care...

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading