Advertisement
Ear/Nose/Throat
Subscribe to Ear/Nose/Throat
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Cook Medical Introduces Tissue Repair Technology

July 22, 2013 12:03 pm | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Cook Medical launched a new treatment option today for rhinologists who treat patients that suffer from difficult-to-heal conditions in the nasal passages. The Biodesign ENT Repair Graft acts as an adjunct to aid in the natural healing process following nasal and sinus mucosal surgery.

Research Leads to Successful Restoration of Hearing and Balance

July 18, 2013 3:35 pm | by Kansas State University | News | Comments

The sounds of success are ringing at Kansas State University through a research project that has potential to treat human deafness and loss of balance. Philine Wangemann, university distinguished professor of anatomy and physiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine, and her international team have published the results of their study in the July issue of the journal PLOS Genetics.

Lantos Technologies lights up $5M

July 11, 2013 1:28 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Lantos Technologies lit up $5.1 million of a hoped-for $18.8 million funding round for its 3D ear canal-mapping device, according to a regulatory filing. The Wakefield, Mass.-based company reported that 18 un-named investors joined the equity and options round.

Advertisement

The Pulse: Achieving Sight Through Sound

July 11, 2013 11:09 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a device that helps train the brain to turn sounds into images, detecting cancer by imaging the consumption of sugar, biomedical applications for a new hydrogel, and a nanofiber mesh that treats tumors with both thermotherapy and chemotherapy.

3D-Printed Splint Saves Infant’s Life

July 11, 2013 10:38 am | by The Institute for Genomic Biology | News | Comments

Half a millennium after Johannes Gutenberg printed the bible, researchers printed a 3D splint that saved the life of an infant born with severe tracheobronchomalacia, a birth defect that causes the airway to collapse. While similar surgeries have been preformed using tissue donations and windpipes created from stem cells, this is the first time 3D printing has been used to treat tracheobronchomalacia—at least in a human.

Toddler Who Received Lab-Made Windpipe Dies

July 8, 2013 4:13 pm | by Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A 2-year-old girl who was implanted with a windpipe grown from her own stem cells has died, three months after she became the youngest person to receive the experimental treatment. Hannah Warren died Saturday at Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, hospital spokeswoman Shelli Dankoff said.

CPAP Therapy Reduces Nightmares in Veterans with PTSD and Sleep Apnea

July 8, 2013 4:03 pm | by American Academy of Sleep Medicine | News | Comments

A new study suggests that CPAP therapy reduces nightmares in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and obstructive sleep apnea. Results show that the mean number of nightmares per week fell significantly with CPAP use, and reduced nightmare frequency after starting CPAP was best predicted by CPAP compliance.

Device Enables Blind to ‘See’ with Ears

July 8, 2013 3:59 pm | by Frontiers | News | Comments

The vOICe sensory substitution device is a revolutionary tool that helps blind people to use sounds to build an image in their minds of the things around them. A research team, led by Dr Michael Proulx, from the University's Department of Psychology, looked at how blindfolded sighted participants responded to an eye test using the device.

Advertisement

Home Healthcare Presents Design Challenges

July 2, 2013 11:54 am | by Ryan Striker, P.E., Electrical Engineer, Logic PD | Logic PD, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

To unlock the potential of more frequent therapy, medical devices must move out of the doctor’s office and travel with patients to their homes and offices. But, this great opportunity is not without its challenges. The same patient who stands to reap great benefit from a home medical device may instead endanger themselves by applying the device incorrectly.

Hearing Loss from Loud Blasts May Be Treatable

July 2, 2013 10:31 am | by Stanford University Medical Center | News | Comments

Long-term hearing loss from loud explosions, such as blasts from roadside bombs, may not be as irreversible as previously thought. Using a mouse model, the study found that loud blasts actually cause hair-cell and nerve-cell damage, rather than structural damage to the cochlea.

The Obstacles to Design Success for Home Care Products

July 1, 2013 4:38 pm | by Garren Walters, Applications Team Leader, Precision Fluidics Division, Parker Hannifin | Parker Hannifin Corporation | Blogs | Comments

As Parker sees it, the three biggest obstacles to [design] success for patient care products, such as oxygen concentrators and ventilators, are portability, battery life, and reliability. To make home care products more portable, Parker has reduced the size of some valves up to 75%.

Poland - a New Player in Medical Tourism Sector

June 28, 2013 9:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Is it possible, that in 2-3 years Brits, Germans, Scandinavians, and Russians will undergo cancer treatment, orthopaedic, or cardiac surgery procedures in Polish medical facilities more often? Treat teeth and get implants in dental clinics; take a cure in Polish sanatoriums?

Insights into How Brain Compensates for Recurring Hearing Loss Point to New Glue Ear Therapies

June 27, 2013 3:39 pm | by Wellcome Trust | News | Comments

Important new insights into how the brain compensates for temporary hearing loss during infancy, such as that commonly experienced by children with glue ear, are revealed in a research study in ferrets. The Wellcome Trust-funded study at the University of Oxford could point to new therapies for glue ear and has implications for the design of hearing aid devices.

Advertisement

Spinning Up Antibacterial Silver on Glass

June 27, 2013 10:30 am | by Inderscience Publishers | News | Comments

The antibacterial effects of silver are well established. Now, researchers at Yonsei University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, have developed a technique to coat glass with a layer of silver ions that can prevent growth of pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni. The technology could be used to protect medical equipment.

Powering the Homecare Medical Device Market

June 26, 2013 2:54 pm | by John Benatti, Field Applications Engineer, Astrodyne | Articles | Comments

With the 3rd Edition of IEC 60601-1 impacting U.S. design engineers in June, it is critical they are aware of the implications to their medical device designs. For home healthcare devices, there is a collateral standard that will have a specific effect. This article focuses in on powering these products and the items in the standard of significance for that aspect.

Class I Medical Device Recall: Medtronic Xomed, Inc., NIM Trivantage EMG Endotracheal Tube

June 21, 2013 12:00 am | by U.S. Food & Drug Administration | News | Comments

The firm received complaints of "cuff leak" or "cuff deflation" occurring when the inflation valve cap is inappropriately removed (pulled off, instead of snapped-off sideways). This requires the physician to re-inflate or replace the deflated tube to ensure the continued breathing support of the patient. Use of this recalled product can result in serious adverse health consequences, including death.

New Array Measures Vibrations Across Skin May Help Engineers Design Tactile Displays

June 14, 2013 9:16 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings. Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.

Researchers Design Sensitive New Microphone Modeled on Fly Ear

June 3, 2013 9:43 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Using the sensitive ears of a parasitic fly for inspiration, a group of researchers has created a new type of microphone that achieves better acoustical performance than what is currently available in hearing aids. The scientists will present their results at the 21st International Congress on Acoustics, held June 2-7 in Montreal.

3-D Printing Goes from Sci-Fi Fantasy to Reality

June 2, 2013 9:37 am | by MARTHA MENDOZA, AP National Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Invisalign, a San Jose company, uses 3-D printing to make each mouthful of customized, transparent braces. Mackenzies Chocolates, a confectioner in Santa Cruz, uses a 3-D printer to pump out chocolate molds. And earlier this year, Cornell University researchers used a 3-D printer, along with injections of a special collagen gel, to create a human-shaped ear.

Distributing Healthcare

May 31, 2013 3:20 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

One of the most interesting things about my position is seeing the changes in one of the most dynamic industries around—the medical device industry (and, in a broader sense, the healthcare industry). In my 13+ years of reporting on this industry, I’ve seen many changes and technological advances. It truly is remarkable to think about how far certain sectors of the industry have come in what is really a very short period of time.

Cochlear Americas Receives FDA Approval for the First and Only Ear Level Accessory for Waterproof Hearing with Cochlear Implants

May 31, 2013 1:07 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Cochlear Americas, the global leader in implantable hearing solutions, announced today that the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a one-of-a-kind Aqua Accessory compatible with the Cochlear Nucleus 5 Sound Processor. The Aqua Accessory is a custom cover with a double zip lock seal designed to hold the processor and coil inside, and can be worn behind the ear in the normal position.

Research Shows Copper Destroys Norovirus

May 29, 2013 10:03 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

New research from the University of Southampton shows that copper and copper alloys will rapidly destroy norovirus - the highly-infectious sickness bug. The virus can be contracted from contaminated food or water, person-to-person contact, and contact with contaminated surfaces, meaning surfaces made from copper could effectively shut down one avenue of infection.

Men Who Want to Stay Active, Feel Younger, and Remain Socially and Professionally Engaged Should Address Hearing Loss, BHI Advises

May 23, 2013 4:18 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

WASHINGTON, May 23, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Hearing health affects a man's lifestyle, and if he wants to stay active, feel younger, and remain socially and professionally engaged, he should address any hearing loss he may be experiencing. This is the overriding message that the...

Doctors Save Boy by 'Printing' an Airway Tube

May 23, 2013 10:12 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a medical first, doctors used plastic particles and a 3D laser printer to create an airway splint to save the life of a baby boy who used to stop breathing nearly every day. It's the latest advance from the booming field of regenerative medicine, making body parts in the lab.

Frequent Heartburn May Predict Cancers of the Throat and Vocal Cord

May 23, 2013 10:00 am | by AACR | News | Comments

Frequent heartburn was positively associated with cancers of the throat and vocal cord among nonsmokers and nondrinkers, and the use of antacids, but not prescription medications, had a protective effect, according to data published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading