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Streamlined Process for Wire-Reinforced Catheters and Delivery Devices

October 28, 2014 8:30 am | by Ronelle Decker, Market Development Manager, Avalon Laboratories | Avalon Laboratories, LLC | Articles | Comments

Balloon catheters, stent and stent delivery systems, atherectomy, and occlusion and neurovascular catheters, as well as other catheter-based devices, advance over a guide wire until it reaches the stenosis, obstruction, or stent delivery site...

Remote-Controlled Drug Delivery in Space

October 27, 2014 9:54 am | by Houston Methodist Research Institute | News | Comments

Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists will receive about $1.25 million from the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to develop an implantable device that delivers therapeutic drugs at a rate guided by remote control...

Reversing Blindness and Eliminating Deafness

October 24, 2014 10:59 am | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth...

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October 2014 Digital Edition

October 21, 2014 3:22 pm | by MDT Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

With the advantages plastics can offer, along with the flexibility in material selection and physical characteristics, it’s no wonder why molding is used to some degree in a large percentage of medical device designs. Moving Molding Forward is a Roundtable feature that highlights...

Invisible Sensors for a Better View of the Brain

October 21, 2014 10:07 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which...

Implant Could Eliminate Reading Glasses

October 20, 2014 12:18 pm | by American Academy of Opthalmology | News | Comments

A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology...

Why Might the Medical Device Industry Lose $34 Billion?

October 20, 2014 11:05 am | by A.T. Kearney | News | Comments

The medical device industry has enjoyed stability, strong growth, healthy margins and above average price-to-earnings ratios over the last 20 years. However, disruptive change is already underway and the future of the industry will be different...

Tear Duct Implant Reduces Pain and Inflammation in Cataract Patients

October 20, 2014 10:01 am | by American Academy of Ophthalmology | News | Comments

The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented at AAO 2014...

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Protecting Implantable Neurostimulation Devices

October 20, 2014 8:30 am | by Dick Molin, Sr. Medical Market Specialist, SCS Coatings | Specialty Coating Systems | Articles | Comments

Neurostimulation, which was developed decades ago primarily for treating spinal cord injuries, has expanded over the years to alleviate or control various medical conditions, including epilepsy, chronic pain, bladder or fecal incontinence...

Recharging Medical Devices Faster…MUCH Faster

October 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to portable electronics, the power source can often be the biggest challenge for a designer attempting to reduce the size of a device. Batteries are typically the largest component in the device design. When it comes to medical devices...

CE Mark for Boston Scientific’s Full-Body MRI Safe Pacemaker

October 17, 2014 9:14 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Boston Scientific Corporation has received CE Mark approval for the ACCOLADE pacemaker family. When implanted with the company's INGEVITY leads, ACCOLADE pacemakers are the first to enable patients to receive full-body MRI scans in both 1.5...

Energy Harvesting ICs Power the Electric Body

October 17, 2014 8:30 am | by Niranjan Pathare, Sr. Market Development Manager, Battery Management Solutions, Texas Instruments | Articles | Comments

Homo sapiens are once again at a crucial juncture in their evolution timeline that started almost three million years ago. Evidence of the next phase is already here, but no one knows for sure how or where we will end up. But a term coined...

Tiny Sound-Powered Chip Offers Innovative Medical Applications

October 16, 2014 12:08 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers can already power this prototype medical implant chip without wires by using ultrasound. Now they want to make it much smaller. Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor...

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Shape-Memory Wire Tube Provides Better Bladder Disease Treatment

October 16, 2014 11:45 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The millions of people worldwide who suffer from the painful bladder disease known as interstitial cystitis (IC) may soon have a better, long-term treatment option, thanks to a controlled-release, implantable device invented by MIT professor...

The Pulse: Robotic Spoon Feeding and Watching You Sleep

October 16, 2014 10:28 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re feeding the disabled with a robotic spoon, fighting DME with an implant in the eye, improving restfulness by watching you sleep, and evaluating head impacts in real time. Robotic Spoon Feeds Disabled:...

Remotely Monitoring Heart Failure Patients with an Implantable Sensor

October 15, 2014 12:23 pm | by UCSF | News | Comments

Hypertension. Peripheral neuropathy. Sciatica. You name the disorder, and Norman Marigney of Santa Rosa may have it. In fact, he’s been hospitalized four times in the past year for heart failure, which affects about 5.5 million Americans, according to the American Heart Association...

Retinal Prosthesis Provides Light/Darkness Differentiation

October 15, 2014 11:10 am | by Duke Medicine | Videos | Comments

Larry Hester, 66, has been blind for half his life from a condition called retinitis pigmentosa. In September, 2014, an electronic stimulator was surgically implanted in his left eye. On October 1st, 2014 Duke eye surgeon Dr. Paul Hahn turned ...

FDA Approved Leads Safe for Full-Body MRI Scans

October 15, 2014 9:46 am | by Medtronic | News | Comments

Medtronic announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of its CapSureFix Novus MRI SureScan 5076 Lead for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The lead is approved for MRI scans positioned on any region of the body when...

FDA Seeks to Address Cybersecurity Challenges in Medical Devices

October 14, 2014 2:39 pm | by Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures, CDRH | Blogs | Comments

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers...

Stents Not Found to Help Prevent Future Strokes

October 14, 2014 10:24 am | by Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care | News | Comments

The risk of having another stroke is higher if patients, after dilation of their blood vessels in the brain, not only receive clot-inhibiting drugs, but also have small tubes called stents inserted. However, studies have provided no hint of a benefit from stenting, which is also referred to...

Gaming Through Clinical Trials

October 13, 2014 2:41 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

Recently, I saw a news piece out of Carnegie Mellon University where researchers supported the use of “video game” style trials of life science hypotheses to prevent the instance of error and fraud. Massive online laboratories would be established...

Biocoating Prevents Blood from Clotting on Implantables

October 13, 2014 11:42 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten...

RFID Technology Localizes Breast Tumors

October 10, 2014 11:40 am | by UW-Madison | News | Comments

Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy, and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected. Especially the...

Orthopedic Implants Could Cause Skin Cancer

October 10, 2014 11:22 am | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer...

Implantable Device and Stem Cells Could Contribute to Cure for Diabetes

October 10, 2014 10:39 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Harvard stem cell researchers today announced that they have made a giant leap forward in the quest to find a truly effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, a condition that affects an estimated three million Americans at a cost of about $15 billion...

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