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The Lead

Wirelessly Charged Microchip Expands Opportunities for Implantables

December 17, 2014 9:51 pm | by Melissa Barnes, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

In their quest to integrate microchip technology with internal medical devices, a team of Stanford engineers, led by Professor Ada Poon, and John Ho, electrical engineering student, have invented a groundbreaking solution for wirelessly charging devices implanted in the body...

Key Method for Manipulating Cells in Engineered Tissues Developed

December 17, 2014 9:33 pm | by Carnegie Mellon | News | Comments

Carnegie Mellon University Professor Adam Feinberg and his colleagues have developed a new...

Infographic: Outsourcing in the Development of Medical Devices

December 17, 2014 10:11 am | by Eileen Whitmore, Art Director, and Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

MDT sent out a survey to readers focused on their experience with outsourcing in the development...

What Do You Mean You Aren’t Outsourcing?

December 17, 2014 10:07 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When I started covering this industry more than 15 years ago, using outsourcing service...

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CAM Software Enhances the Quality of Orthopedic Implants

December 16, 2014 10:04 am | by Helene Horent, DP Technology | Articles | Comments

To provide minimally-invasive equipment and high-quality products, it is essential to acquire the best technology for production. To meet these objectives, Stryker chose to use ESPRIT, a computer-aided-manufacturing (CAM) software that comes equipped...

Using Implantable Neuromodulation Devices to Fight Disease

December 15, 2014 1:43 pm | by DARPA | News | Comments

Many chronic inflammatory diseases and mental health conditions affecting military Service members and veterans involve abnormal activity in the peripheral nervous system, which plays a key role in organ function. Monitoring and targeted regulation...

Implantable Technology Helps to Regrow Tissue Like Wolverine

December 15, 2014 11:41 am | by FeyeCon | News | Comments

While Hollywood is spending millions of dollars promoting superhuman characters like the fantastic self-healing mutant Wolverine from X-men, mere mortals like us are actually quite spectacular beings themselves. While we definitely need help to recover...

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Meniscus Regenerated with 3-D Printed Implant

December 11, 2014 10:39 am | by Columbia University Medical Center | News | Comments

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have devised a way to replace the knee's protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own...

Programmable Biomaterial Assembles In Vivo to Fight Cancer

December 9, 2014 11:06 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard | News | Comments

One of the reasons cancer is so deadly is that it can evade attack from the body's immune system, which allows tumors to flourish and spread. Scientists can try to induce the immune system, known as immunotherapy, to go into attack mode to fight...

First Injectable Wireless System Offers Pain Relief for Back, Leg

December 8, 2014 12:16 pm | by Stimwave Technologies Inc. | News | Comments

Stimwave Technologies Incorporated, a medical device manufacturer and independent research institute headquartered in Miami Beach, Fla., has received FDA clearance to market the world’s first wireless, micro-technology neuromodulation device...

New Technique Offers Low-Cost 3D Nanostructure Printing

December 8, 2014 10:54 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new lithography technique that uses nanoscale spheres to create three-dimensional (3D) structures with biomedical, electronic and photonic applications. The new technique is...

Out with the Old, In with the New

December 5, 2014 10:48 am | by Ohio University | News | Comments

Advances in computer and electrical engineering have been revolutionary over the past few decades, changing the way we live, work and play. From new advances in medicine to automotive technology and biotechnology, electrical and computer engineering...

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3D Organ Printing to Transform Transplants

December 5, 2014 10:32 am | by Yale University | News | Comments

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine's Department of Surgery and Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science have joined forces with a leading three-dimensional biology company to develop 3D printed tissues for transplant research ...

Friday 5: Connecting Healthcare with TE Connectivity's Thomas Medina

December 5, 2014 9:42 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

I foresee a continuous transition from body-worn to body-integrated devices designed to deliver very specific, customized care. Device function will be monitored and controlled remotely, determined via gene-based diagnosis and therapies; and will be...

Characterizing Tomorrow’s Medical Devices

December 3, 2014 12:07 pm | by Robert Green, Senior Market Development Manager, Keithley Instruments | Articles | Comments

Accurately measuring the load current of an implantable medical device can be quite a challenge. Although an implantable defibrillator might draw just 0.5 microamps of current in sleep or standby mode, the current draw could jump to 5A or higher...

Using Implants to Learn About the Brain and How to Heal It

December 2, 2014 12:24 pm | by GE Reports | News | Comments

The mind has a language of its own, and Jeff Ashe is trying to figure out what exactly it is saying. Ashe and his team at GE Global Research in upstate New York are working with scientists, engineers, and physicians at Brown University to better...

Inexpensive Hydrolyzable Polymer Provides Potential for an Array of Medtech Applications

December 2, 2014 12:05 pm | by Rick Kubetz, Engineering Communications Office, University of Illinois | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have figured out how to reverse the characteristics of a key bonding material—polyurea—providing an inexpensive alternative for a broad number of applications, such as drug delivery...

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The Unusual Relationship Between Shoplifting and Medical Implants

December 2, 2014 11:52 am | by AAMI | News | Comments

With a growing number of patients receiving implantable electronic medical devices, there is increased concern about their exposure to electronic article surveillance (EAS) gates, which are designed to deter shoplifting. AAMI’s Cardiac Rhythm...

‘Skin’ Shedding Medical Devices Could Eliminate Need to Replace

December 1, 2014 9:55 am | by Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg | News | Comments

What to do when functional surfaces fail? When catheters become contaminated with microorganisms or sensors no longer react? Until now, the answer was: remove and replace. The chemist Dr. Karen Lienkamp has received a 1.49 million euros Starting...

New Breakthrough in Flexible Electronics

November 26, 2014 11:06 am | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) | News | Comments

Flexible electronics have been touted as the next generation in electronics in various areas, ranging from consumer electronics to bio-integrated medical devices. In spite of their merits, insufficient performance of organic materials arising from inherent...

Dissolvable Wireless Electronic Implants Fight Bacteria

November 25, 2014 3:42 pm | by Tufts University | News | Comments

Researchers at Tufts University, in collaboration with a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected...

Large Biological Circuits Made Practical with New Device

November 25, 2014 10:38 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits -- systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But while individual components...

Biodegradable Membrane Helps Prevent Blood Vessel Scarring

November 21, 2014 11:32 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

When blood vessels are damaged through surgery, it can trigger an endless cycle of scarring and repair. "Scar tissue will always form inside the blood vessel and, in many cases, eventually block blood flow," said Guillermo Ameer, professor...

Design Software Key to Development of Implantable Artificial Heart

November 21, 2014 9:19 am | by PTC Creo | News | Comments

PTC has announced that researchers at the University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, pioneers in the development of artificial hearts, are using PTC Creo design software for the development of a Total Artificial Heart. The renowned institution...

Top 10 Ways to Cut Manufacturer Supply Chain Costs

November 20, 2014 3:34 pm | by Denise Odenkirk, Senior Director, Industry Solutions, GHX | Blogs | Comments

Although over 85% of med-surg manufacturers are transacting electronically with providers, manual, paper-based supply chain processes for other medical devices, such as implantables continues to contribute significantly to the soaring costs in healthcare...

Blood Test Warns of Kidney Transplant Rejection

November 18, 2014 3:22 pm | by IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute | News | Comments

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and doctors at University Hospital of Bellvitge, together with a team of researchers from the University of California, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, California Pacific Medical...

Coating Drug-Eluting Stents with Cancer Drug to Prevent Heart Attacks

November 18, 2014 3:09 pm | by Mark Tuschman, Stanford | News | Comments

A new study has identified an FDA approved cancer drug, crizotinib, as a possible new coating for drug-eluting stents. Researchers found that crizotinib in mice helped prevent the narrowing of blood vessels after stenting without affecting the...

Magnetic Micro-Actuators Could Serve as a Transport Mechanism Within the Body

November 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Scientists have been conducting research on micrometer-sized actuators which one day may make it possible to transport drugs or chemical sensor molecules to specific locations throughout the human body. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now taken...

Analyst: Debate Over Device Tax Only Masks Needed Reforms

November 18, 2014 12:04 pm | by GlobalData | News | Comments

Rob Littlefield, MSc, GlobalData’s Analyst covering Medical Devices, says, “Republicans in the US Congress are expected to move quickly to revoke the medical device tax, which was imposed two years ago as part of a suite of fees on the healthcare...

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