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Photo of the Day: Hearing Deafening Music

October 10, 2013 2:58 pm | by University of Washington | News | Comments

For many, music is a universal language that unites people when words cannot. But for those who use cochlear implants—technology that allows deaf and hard of hearing people to comprehend speech—hearing music remains extremely challenging...

The Pulse: Peanut Butter & Urine Diagnose Diseases

October 10, 2013 9:56 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on The Pulse, we are diagnosing Alzheimers with a tablespoon of peanut butter and a ruler, using urine to test for eye disease, and taking a look at how the government shutdown is inflicting long-term damage on ...   

Compliance Conscious Suppliers Enhance Patient Safety

October 9, 2013 5:10 pm | by Seth Stewart, PASE System Designer, Watlow | Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company | Blogs | Comments

As a strategic supplier to medical OEMs, it is vital that Watlow remains knowledgeable of changes in market needs and regulations. This allows us to design and develop products in a rapid fashion that meet the unique requirements of the medical equipment market.

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Photos of the Day: 3D-Printed Bacterial Zoos

October 9, 2013 2:12 pm | by The University of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

The researchers use a novel 3-D printing technology to build homes for bacteria at a microscopic level. The resulting structures can be of almost any shape or size, and can be moved around in relationship to other structures…   

Photos of the Day: Slice of Life

October 8, 2013 11:30 am | by David Stipp | News | Comments

Collagen implants have long been used to help heal shattered bones, burns and other injuries. But there’s a problem: The protein’s tough, water-insoluble fibrils make it hard to work with. Because of this, it is typically broken down into a gel...

Photo of the Day: Breath of Fresh Air...for Asthma Treatment

October 7, 2013 3:39 pm | by Elhuyar Fundazioa | News | Comments

In a piece of research run at the Paediatric Service of the Hospital Universitario Donostia, Dr Paula Corcuera-Elosegui, assistant consultant in Infant Pneumology, has studied the validity of the exhaled nitric oxide measurement as a complementary...

Photos of the Day: Walking with the Mind

October 4, 2013 12:17 pm | by Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago | News | Comments

The science of bionics helped the more than one million Americans with leg amputations take a giant step forward, as the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) revealed clinical applications for the world’s first thought-controlled bionic leg in the September 26, 2013 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

Obamacare vs. The ACA: A Lesson in Branding

October 3, 2013 3:21 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

You might produce the most groundbreaking piece of medical technology available tomorrow, but if the name makes it sound like the same ol’ tired thing that’s already available, sales will most certainly reflect that. No amount of sales and marketing teams hitting the pavement will change that.

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Photos of the Day: Patient Monitoring via Google Glass

October 3, 2013 2:18 pm | by Philips | News | Comments

Royal Philips and Accenture today announced the creation of a proof-of-concept demonstration that uses a Google Glass head-mounted display for researching ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of performing surgical procedures. The demonstration connects Google Glass to Philips IntelliVue Solutions...

Photo of the Day: ‘Eying’ Disease

October 2, 2013 12:32 pm | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

For hundreds of years, optical devices like telescopes and microscopes have relied on solid lenses that slide up and down to magnify and to focus. To tune how much light is received, conventional devices use mechanical contraptions like the blades that form the adjustable aperture in cameras.

Gentlemen, We Can Rebuild Him. We [Will] Have The Technology.

October 1, 2013 3:35 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

One day, I envision that there will be medical technology that can exceed the capabilities of the human body’s natural physiology. Should someone with such a device be prevented from playing professional sports due to the competitive advantage it provides?

Photos of the Day: Accelerator on a Chip

October 1, 2013 1:20 pm | News | Comments

In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

Photos of the Day: Funding Regeneration

September 30, 2013 11:47 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Implants made of biocompatible material will help heal soldiers wounded in the battlefield and civilians as well through research at Rice University and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The implants hold open a space for a more permanent repair.

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Is Tape Encryption the Answer for Data Security?

September 27, 2013 4:22 pm | by Laura Loredo, Product Marketing Manager, Nearline Storage, Hewlett Packard; Craig Butler, Senior Program Manager, Data Protection and Retention Systems, IBM; and Yan Yan Liang, Segment Marketing Manager, Quantum Corporation | Blogs | Comments

Medical professionals can agree that protecting patient information is one of their top priorities. Patients put a lot of trust into their healthcare providers to maintain that their information is never lost or stolen, and providers are subject to rigorous standards, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Photos of the Day: Affordable Blood Flow Imaging

September 27, 2013 11:48 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

Blood flow is routinely measured in the clinic, and laser speckle contrast imaging is one way of measuring these changes; however, this technique requires professional-grade imaging equipment, which limits its use. Now, using $90 worth of off-the-shelf commercial parts including a webcam and a laser pointer, researchers have duplicated the performance of expensive, scientific-grade LSCI instruments at a fraction of the cost.

Photos of the Day: Building a 'Body'

September 26, 2013 3:18 pm | by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | News | Comments

Whether it's the Ebola virus or Sarin and Ricin, a key to responding to chemical or biological attacks is having effective antidotes at the ready. To accelerate the development of new therapies, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine is leading a unique $24 million federally funded project to develop a "body on a chip" that will be used to develop these countermeasures.

The Pulse: Self-Healing Polymer for Wound Care

September 26, 2013 10:51 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, brought to you by MDT TV, we're treating wounds with a self-healing polymer, implanting a cure for sleep apnea, printing objects in 3D for the blind, and monitoring vital signs with a shirt. This episode feature: Scientists have created the world's first self-healing polymer that can repair itself without any intervention, offering potential applications in wound care.

Device Makers: Custodians of Patient Data

September 25, 2013 3:04 pm | by Charles Murphy, Vice President, Cloud Operations, Pilgrim Software | Pilgrim Quality Solutions | Blogs | Comments

The key to protecting PHI data is education, execution, and continuous verification. The first thing is to understand your obligation as a custodian of this sensitive data. This is best done through formal HIPAA/HIPAA-HITECH training to understand the regulation.

Photos of the Day: Sensor Skin from Nanotubes

September 25, 2013 11:17 am | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen | News | Comments

Researchers at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) are showing the way toward low-cost, industrial-scale manufacturing of a new family of electronic devices. A leading example is a gas sensor that could be integrated into food packaging to gauge freshness, or into compact wireless air-quality monitors.

Determining Marginal Improvement in Innovation

September 25, 2013 10:23 am | by Keith Calvert, Director, CMNA Engineering Administration, The Tech Group | The Tech Group, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

Research and development is the cornerstone of growth in the medical device industry. R&D funding is available; however, the issue isn’t availability as much as availability for marginal improvement. The question to ask is, “Will a marginal improvement reduce costs for the patient and caregiver?”

Wireless Tech Broadens Healthcare Horizons

September 23, 2013 4:59 pm | by Melissa Barnes, Associate Editor, MDT | Articles | Comments

In the field of medical technology, wireless devices are seeing some of the most broad-reaching growth. This is due mostly in part to the wide range of applications that wireless medicine encompasses. Mobi Health News reports that the top ten areas wireless medicine has directly benefited include: Alzheimer’s, asthma, breast cancer, COPD, depression, diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, obesity, and sleep disorders.

Medical Innovation, One Brick at a Time

September 23, 2013 4:52 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

I can be a kid at heart. And when I say that, I state it with an almost literal meaning. I still enjoy toys. Now, I’m not the 40-year-old virgin character from the movie of the same name, but I can’t admit to not still tinkering with Lego bricks and finding enjoyment from it.

Photo of the Day: Mind over Prosthetics

September 23, 2013 11:45 am | by NC State University | News | Comments

Researchers from NC State and the University of Houston (UH) are hoping to solve the “disconnect” between the mind’s signals and the response (or lack thereof) from a prosthetic device with a new four-year, $1.2 million collaborative project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Innovation Will Come via Investment

September 20, 2013 1:59 pm | by James H. Bleck, President/CEO, Bleck Design Group | Bleck Design Group | Blogs | Comments

We see funding for new medical devices driven by private investment from individuals or private companies. These bold investors are capable of quick decisions as they meter the funding to match progress and discover the real market opportunity.  

Photo of the Day: Helping the Blind to 'See' the Way...Everywhere

September 20, 2013 12:15 pm | by Draper Laboratory | News | Comments

Navigation devices used by blind people today lack the ability to operate indoors and other areas where GPS is not available, and are unable to help the user deal with items that aren’t part of maps, such as crowds and cars. Auburn University is building a prototype device...

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