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The Pulse: Reading Minds with Google Glass and Walking with Toyota

July 23, 2014 3:11 pm | by Jonathan Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

This week on the Pulse, we’re using an open source app to read minds with Google Glass, using Toyota robots to help disabled people walk again, performing an endoscopy with a smartphone, and zinging around on a lightweight mobility chair...

Detecting Concussion-Related Brain Disease in Its Earliest Stages

July 23, 2014 1:41 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head...

Research Brings Us Nearer to Understanding How Neuro Cells Turn Cancerous

July 23, 2014 12:07 pm | by University of Plymouth | News | Comments

Scientists from the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York with the help of...

Genetic Mapping Triggers New Hope on Schizophrenia

July 23, 2014 11:20 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia,...

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Low Strength Brain Stimulation May Be Effective for Depression

July 22, 2014 9:49 am | by Elsevier | News | Comments

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed...

Qualcomm Institute Announces Seed Grants to Build Clusters in Brain, Medical Research

July 21, 2014 11:12 am | by University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

The Qualcomm Institute at the University of California, San Diego has given the green light to 35 new projects that are part of the institute’s Calit2 Strategic Research Opportunities (CSRO) program. Fourteen of these projects are led by...

Innovative Technology Enables Revolutionary New Brain Surgery

July 18, 2014 2:06 pm | by WPBF ABC News | Videos | Comments

There's a revolutionary new procedure and approach to brain surgery that only one hundred doctors in the United States have been trained to perform. It is called BrainPath. After getting a brain hemorrhage from being hit with a golf ball...

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Implantable Tech Developed to Understand How the Brain Retrieves Memories

July 18, 2014 1:57 pm | by Donald B Johnston, LLNL | News | Comments

Livermore scientists are developing electrode array technology for monitoring brain activity as part of a collaborative research project with UC San Francisco to better understand how the neural circuitry of the brain works during memory...

Improved Telemedicine System Connects Doctors to Autism Patients in Rural Georgia

July 18, 2014 9:47 am | by Georgia Tech | News | Comments

To get the best care for her three autistic children, Mandi Larkin would drive three hours from her family’s home in Tifton, Ga., to Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta. The drive to and from Atlanta was exhausting. Missed work, missed school...

Brain-on-a-Chip Used to Assess Axonal Strain Injury

July 18, 2014 9:33 am | by World Scientific | News | Comments

Researchers from the Biomedical Engineering Department of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey recently demonstrated the use of their "Brain-on-a-Chip" microsystem to assess specific effects of traumatic axonal injury. While their...

Squid Skin Protein Could Improve Biomedical Technologies

July 17, 2014 2:35 pm | by University of California - Irvine | News | Comments

The common pencil squid (Loliginidae) may hold the key to a new generation of medical technologies that could communicate more directly with the human body. UC Irvine materials science researchers have discovered that reflectin, a protein...

The Edge Radiosurgery System Can Target Cancer with Sub-Millimeter Accuracy

July 17, 2014 10:54 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Medical researchers have confirmed that the Edge radiosurgery system from Varian Medical Systems can deliver dose to a targeted tumor with sub-millimeter isocenter accuracy.  The researchers, from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in...

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Clemson University Bioengineering Center Lands $11 Million for Tissue Research

July 17, 2014 10:32 am | by Clemson University | News | Comments

Clemson University has been awarded $11 million to expand a bioengineering center that helps mentor junior faculty members as they research how lab-grown tissue can treat some of the world’s most debilitating diseases, ranging from heart...

Photos of the Day: Making a Mental Match

July 16, 2014 1:52 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Georgia Tech has created a functional MRI-compatible rehab device for stroke patients that creates a long latency stretch reflex at the exact time as a brain signal. A pneumatic actuator tendon hammer hits a person's wrist while a transcranial...

Device Helps Rebuild Neural Connections for Stroke Patients

July 16, 2014 1:46 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

The repetitive facilitation exercise (RFE) is one of the most common rehabilitation tactics for stroke patients attempting to regain wrist movement. Stroke hemiparesis individuals are not able to move that part of their body because they...

Transplantation of New Brain Cells Reverses Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Disease Model

July 16, 2014 9:48 am | by Gladstone Institutes | News | Comments

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice...

New Knowledge About the Brain's Effective Bouncer

July 16, 2014 9:45 am | by University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences | News | Comments

Research from the University of Copenhagen is shedding new light on the brain's complicated barrier tissue. The blood-brain barrier is an effective barrier which protects the brain, but which at the same time makes it difficult to treat...

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Virtual Humans Inspire Patients to Open Up

July 16, 2014 9:22 am | by USC | News | Comments

A new USC study suggests that patients are more willing to disclose personal information to virtual humans than actual ones, in large part because computers lack the proclivity to look down on people the way another human might. The research...

A Tool to Fix One of the Most Dangerous Moments in Surgery

July 15, 2014 1:47 pm | by TEDx | Videos | Comments

Surgeons are required every day to puncture human skin before procedures — with the risk of damaging what's on the other side. In a fascinating talk, find out how mechanical engineer Nikolai Begg is using physics to update an important medical...

Study of Noninvasive Retinal Imaging Device Presented at Alzheimer's Conference

July 14, 2014 10:27 am | by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center | News | Comments

A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary results from investigators conducting...

Smell and Eye Tests Show Potential to Detect Alzheimer's Early

July 14, 2014 10:23 am | by Alzheimer's Association | News | Comments

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain...

St. Jude Medical Announces Definitive Agreement to Acquire NeuroTherm

July 14, 2014 9:24 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

St. Jude Medical, a global medical device company, today announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire privately held NeuroTherm, Inc., a manufacturer of interventional pain management therapies, for approximately $200 million...

Seeing the Inner Workings of the Brain Made Easier

July 11, 2014 2:21 pm | by Amy Adams, Stanford University | News | Comments

Last year, Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, announced a new way of peering into a disembodied brain that provided spectacular fly-through views of its inner connections. Since...

Sunshine Act Will Reveal Manufacturers’ Payments to Docs in September

July 11, 2014 2:04 pm | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

When many of us have a medical appointment we're concerned about our finances: how much will we owe out-of-pocket? What's our co-pay? But next time, you may also want to ask your doctors about their financial situation. That's because nearly...

A Start-Up at NJIT Develops Bleeding-Control Gel for Brain Surgery

July 11, 2014 9:58 am | by New Jersey Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Endomedix, a start-up company housed at NJIT's business incubator, received a $1.4 million federal grant to develop a spray-on gel that surgeons will use to staunch bleeding during brain surgery. Surgeons can spray the gel onto a surgical...

Ultrasound Tracks Odor Representation in the Brain

July 11, 2014 9:26 am | by CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange) | News | Comments

A new ultrasound imaging technique has provided the first ever in vivo visualization of activity in the piriform cortex of rats during odor perception. This deep-seated brain structure plays an important role in olfaction, and was inaccessible...

Rep. Patrick Kennedy Visits Moberg's Facility to Discuss Improvement in Brain Injury Care

July 11, 2014 9:12 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Recently, former Congressman Patrick Kennedy visited Moberg Research's (Moberg) medical device manufacturing facility. Rep. Kennedy and Dick Moberg discussed how Moberg's advanced neurological monitors facilitate cutting-edge research in...

Making a Wire-Free Future

July 10, 2014 9:56 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

More than a century ago, engineer and inventor Nikola Tesla proposed a global system of wireless transmission of electricity — or wireless power. But one key obstacle to realizing this ambitious vision has always been the inefficiency of...

New Type of Stent Could Help Some Brain Aneurysm Patients

July 10, 2014 8:34 am | by Northwestern Memorial Hospital | News | Comments

After Susan Wakulich was told she had an aneurysm, she figured an invasive brain surgery and lengthy recovery lay ahead of her. "I was devastated," said Wakulich, who is 56 years old and lives in Chicago's western suburbs. "I knew this was...

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