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The Lead

Device Could Signal Best Bet for Treatment of Stroke Patients

August 22, 2014 3:16 pm | by University of Arkansas at Little Rock | News | Comments

A new device developed by a physician at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and a researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock could soon be available to treat stroke more effectively. The ClotBust ER fits on the head...

Design Innovation vs. The ‘What If?’

August 22, 2014 2:03 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-In-Chief | Blogs | Comments

There are many obstacles to a successful product design getting into the marketplace (in the...

Severing Nerves May Shrink Stomach Cancers

August 21, 2014 1:56 pm | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical...

FDA Approves Changes to Manufacturing Process for Covidien’s Pipeline Embolization Device

August 21, 2014 10:48 am | by Covidien | News | Comments

Covidien plc (NYSE: COV) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration...

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July/August 2014 Digital Edition

August 21, 2014 10:40 am | by MDT Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

As humans integrate more electronics into their bodies to monitor their health, new ICs are expected to extract ambient energy from their surroundings to power these revolutionary devices, explains Niranjan Pathare of Texas Instruments in our Cover Story...

University Spinoff Aims to Hit the Mark Precisely with Brain-Scanning Tool

August 20, 2014 2:31 pm | by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

As brain surgeons test new procedures and drugs to treat conditions ranging from psychiatric disorders to brain cancer, accuracy is becoming an ever-greater issue. In treating the brain, the state of the art today starts with images from a...

Mixed-Reality Simulators for Training in Treatment of Injured Soldiers

August 20, 2014 11:23 am | by University of Florida Health | News | Comments

On the battlefield, wounded soldiers depend on how quickly and efficiently medical personnel can treat and stabilize their life-threatening injuries. To help military medical personnel acquire, practice or maintain these key skills while...

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'Tickling' Your Ear Could Be Good for Your Heart

August 20, 2014 11:07 am | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered. A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the...

Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice

August 20, 2014 9:55 am | by Stanford University School of Medicine | News | Comments

When investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine applied light-driven stimulation to nerve cells in the brains of mice that had suffered strokes several days earlier, the mice showed significantly greater recovery in motor...

Taking the Pulse of Aging

August 19, 2014 2:21 pm | by Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology | News | Comments

Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing correlations between...

Wireless Energy Transfer System Charges Devices Without Cables

August 19, 2014 11:05 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) have designed a new device for wireless energy transfer that will, for example, charge mobile phones or laptops without needing cables. The system, patented by the UPV, is based...

Zebrafish Help to Unravel Alzheimer’s Disease

August 19, 2014 10:54 am | by VIB - Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology | News | Comments

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at VIB and KU Leuven...

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Benefits of the Connected Hospital

August 19, 2014 10:46 am | by Laird | Videos | Comments

The Connected Hospital is a vision of a fully integrated hospital where wireless technology allows care givers and patients to roam throughout the hospital while providing accurate and timely monitoring. The Connected Hospital collects the...

GE Healthcare: New Dementia Research Reveals Overwhelming Demand for “The Value of Knowing”

August 19, 2014 10:34 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Three out of four people would want to know what kind of neurological disorder they had even if there was no cure, according to new global research from GE Healthcare. An even higher percentage of respondents, 81%, would want to identify an...

Surgeons First in U.S. to Implant Device to Treat Cluster Headaches

August 18, 2014 4:08 pm | by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center | News | Comments

For those suffering excruciating pain from cluster headaches, relief may soon be available from an investigational device being studied in a national multicenter clinical trial. Recently, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical...

Global Tissue Engineering and Regeneration Market to Reach $56.9 Billion in 2019

August 18, 2014 10:09 am | by BCC Research | News | Comments

BCC Research reveals in its new report, Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: Technologies and Global Markets, the global market for tissue engineering and regeneration is expected to grow to $56.9 billion by 2019, with a five-year compound...

Abbott & DOD to Develop Portable Blood Tests for Evaluating Concussions

August 18, 2014 10:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Abbott and the United States Department of Defense have announced a collaboration with the intent to develop portable blood tests to help evaluate potential concussions, also called mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). As part of a multi–phased...

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Photos of the Day: Concussion Blood Test

August 18, 2014 9:59 am | by Abbott | News | Comments

Abbott's handheld, diagnostic analyzer is capable of performing a panel of commonly ordered blood tests on two or three drops of blood at the patient's side. Research suggests that certain proteins are released in the bloodstream following...

Dopamine replacement associated with impulse control increase in early Parkinson's

August 15, 2014 4:31 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. The study also found that initiation of dopamine replacement therapy, the most common treatment for PD, was associated with increasing frequency of impulse control disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness. The new findings ...

Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too

August 15, 2014 2:49 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats "see" with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology. In fact, the perception process in question could improve sonar and radar technology.

New gene editing method may help correct muscular dystrophy

August 15, 2014 10:52 am | by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | News | Comments

Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct a mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. Researchers used a technique called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, which can precisely remove a mutation in DNA, allowing the body's DNA repair mechanisms to ...

Memories of errors foster faster learning

August 15, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.

New non-invasive technique controls size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier

August 14, 2014 4:14 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new technique developed by Elisa Konofagou, professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia Engineering, has demonstrated for the first time that the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be controlled using acoustic pressure—the pressure of an ultrasound beam—to let specific molecules through.

Bypass commands from the brain to legs through a computer

August 14, 2014 10:08 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Gait disturbance in individuals with spinal cord injury is attributed to the interruption of neural pathways from brain to the spinal locomotor center, whereas neural circuits locate below and above the lesion maintain most of their functions. An artificial connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects brain to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss.

“Trojan horse” treatment could beat brain tumors

August 13, 2014 2:55 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A "Trojan horse" treatment for an aggressive form of brain cancer, which involves using tiny nanoparticles of gold to kill tumour cells, has been successfully tested by scientists. The ground-breaking technique could eventually be used to treat glioblastoma multiforme, which is ...

Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 11:21 am | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain's thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time. The findings contradict the concept that brain tumors need to grow their own blood vessels to keep themselves growing ...

Expert Panel Concludes Neurostimulation Can Be Life-Changing Therapy for Chronic Pain

August 12, 2014 11:07 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Chronic pain, which persists despite the fact that an injury has healed, can last for many months or years and may affect up to 15 percent of the adult population at any point in time. While it is a condition in its own right, it can be a component of other conditions. Neurostimulation, which involves stimulating pain-sensing nerves to convert painful sensations into nonpainful ones, offers ...

Research Shows Promise for New Nerve Repair Technique

August 11, 2014 4:08 pm | by Alison Perry, University of Kentucky | News | Comments

A multicenter study including University of Kentucky researchers found that a new nerve repair technique yields better results and fewer side effects than other existing techniques. Traumatic nerve injuries are common, and when nerves are severed, they do not heal on their own and must ...

Computer Software to Unravel Embryonic Development Cell by Cell

August 8, 2014 10:51 am | by Reuters | Videos | Comments

Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research campus are using a new type of computer software to track and image how a nervous system develops in unprecedented detail. The new system is able to track individual cells...

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