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Eviva PSU Polymer for Implantable Brain Shunts

October 31, 2014 8:30 am | by Solvay Specialty Polymers | Solvay Specialty Polymers | Articles | Comments

Implantable brain shunt valves and access ports from France-based Sophysa, a leading supplier of adjustable neurosurgical valves for hydrocephalus treatment, are made of Eviva polysulfone (PSU) resin from Solvay Specialty Polymers. Eviva PSU...

Reconstruction of a Patterned Piece of Spinal Cord in 3D Culture

October 30, 2014 11:00 am | by Technische Universitaet Dresden | News | Comments

Mouse embryonic stem cells differentiate into structures that resemble the neural tube and show...

Solidscape: Precision 3D Printing That Saves Lives

October 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Solidscape | Articles | Comments

It’s not hard to see that the 3D printing industry is taking the world by storm. With new...

Battling Brain Tumors with Toxin-Secreting Stem Cells

October 24, 2014 2:00 pm | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way...

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Reversing Blindness and Eliminating Deafness

October 24, 2014 10:59 am | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth...

MusicGlove: Hand Rehabilitation Through Music and Gaming

October 23, 2014 4:19 pm | by Flint Rehabilitation Devices | News | Comments

Flint Rehabilitation Devices today introduced MusicGlove, the world’s first FDA approved, clinically validated hand rehabilitation device that uses music and gaming to make therapy fun and effective for the over six million people with stroke or other...

Relieving Headaches with Vagus Nerve Stimulation

October 23, 2014 9:45 am | by Vane Percy & Roberts | News | Comments

Preliminary results of an open-label trial carried in the journal of Headache and Pain reported that a single treatment with electroCore’s hand held non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) device gammaCore, completely resolved 44.8% of...

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Taking 'Charge' of Your Mood

October 22, 2014 9:51 am | by Sam Brusco, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

As we go about our daily activities, we’re at the mercy of whatever mood we’re in. That’s all well and good when in a favorable mood, as productivity peaks, any obligation becomes more enjoyable, and whistling or singing accompanies your work...

Invisible Sensors for a Better View of the Brain

October 21, 2014 10:07 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which...

Protecting Implantable Neurostimulation Devices

October 20, 2014 8:30 am | by Dick Molin, Sr. Medical Market Specialist, SCS Coatings | Specialty Coating Systems | Articles | Comments

Neurostimulation, which was developed decades ago primarily for treating spinal cord injuries, has expanded over the years to alleviate or control various medical conditions, including epilepsy, chronic pain, bladder or fecal incontinence...

Recharging Medical Devices Faster…MUCH Faster

October 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to portable electronics, the power source can often be the biggest challenge for a designer attempting to reduce the size of a device. Batteries are typically the largest component in the device design. When it comes to medical devices...

Spinal Stimulator Could Improve Bladder Function for Paralyzed

October 17, 2014 10:47 am | by University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

People who have suffered spinal cord injuries are often susceptible to bladder infections, and those infections can cause kidney damage and even death. New UCLA research may go a long way toward solving the problem. A team of scientists studied...

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Energy Harvesting ICs Power the Electric Body

October 17, 2014 8:30 am | by Niranjan Pathare, Sr. Market Development Manager, Battery Management Solutions, Texas Instruments | Articles | Comments

Homo sapiens are once again at a crucial juncture in their evolution timeline that started almost three million years ago. Evidence of the next phase is already here, but no one knows for sure how or where we will end up. But a term coined...

Tiny Sound-Powered Chip Offers Innovative Medical Applications

October 16, 2014 12:08 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers can already power this prototype medical implant chip without wires by using ultrasound. Now they want to make it much smaller. Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor...

Surgical Robot Enables Brain Surgery Through the Cheek

October 16, 2014 10:47 am | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of...

The Pulse: Robotic Spoon Feeding and Watching You Sleep

October 16, 2014 10:28 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re feeding the disabled with a robotic spoon, fighting DME with an implant in the eye, improving restfulness by watching you sleep, and evaluating head impacts in real time. Robotic Spoon Feeds Disabled:...

Reprogrammed Skin Cells Could Lead to Alzheimer’s Cure

October 15, 2014 10:01 am | by University of Wollongong | News | Comments

Neuroscientists from UOW are reprogramming skin cells in order to discover new treatments and ultimately a cure for a range of devastating brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Schizophrenia and Motor Neurone Disease. Dr Lezanne Ooi, from the...

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FDA Seeks to Address Cybersecurity Challenges in Medical Devices

October 14, 2014 2:39 pm | by Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures, CDRH | Blogs | Comments

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers...

Stents Not Found to Help Prevent Future Strokes

October 14, 2014 10:24 am | by Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care | News | Comments

The risk of having another stroke is higher if patients, after dilation of their blood vessels in the brain, not only receive clot-inhibiting drugs, but also have small tubes called stents inserted. However, studies have provided no hint of a benefit from stenting, which is also referred to...

Gaming Through Clinical Trials

October 13, 2014 2:41 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

Recently, I saw a news piece out of Carnegie Mellon University where researchers supported the use of “video game” style trials of life science hypotheses to prevent the instance of error and fraud. Massive online laboratories would be established...

Biocoating Prevents Blood from Clotting on Implantables

October 13, 2014 11:42 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten...

Meaghan's Minute: Helping Stroke Victims Communicate

October 13, 2014 11:31 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Meaghans' Minute, researchers at East Tennessee State University have shown that a brain-computer interface (BCI) device can be beneficial to patients who have suffered a brainstem stroke and are experiencing “locked-in” syndrome and...

Radio Waves Sensor Technology Could Put Electronic ‘Touch’ on Prosthetics

October 10, 2014 11:51 am | by Stanford School of Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries. The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like...

Erasing Memories with Light

October 10, 2014 10:52 am | by University of California - Davis | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together...

Detecting Depression in the Elderly

October 10, 2014 10:11 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Specialists at the Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM) of Mexico developed a system that achieved detecting depression in older adults, through monitoring their daily routine. This technology can be used as an auxiliary tool for the care of...

Implantable Medical Devices that Dissolve When No Longer Needed

October 10, 2014 9:53 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Electronic devices that dissolve completely in water, leaving behind only harmless end products, are part of a rapidly emerging class of technology pioneered by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Early results demonstrate...

A Remote Control for Neurons

October 9, 2014 9:43 am | by The Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A proposal to develop a new way to remotely control brain cells from Sarah Stanley, a Research Associate in Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, headed by Jeffrey M. Friedman, is among the first to receive funding...

Thought-Controlled Prosthesis

October 9, 2014 9:37 am | by Chalmers University of Technology | News | Comments

For the first time, robotic prostheses controlled via implanted neuromuscular interfaces have become a clinical reality. A novel osseointegrated (bone-anchored) implant system gives patients new opportunities in their daily life and professional...

Prosthetic Hand Restores the Sense of Touch

October 9, 2014 9:28 am | by Case Western Reserve University | News | Comments

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident 4 years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps. Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs rise when a researcher...

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