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Recharging Medical Devices Faster…MUCH Faster

October 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to portable electronics, the power source can often be the biggest challenge for a designer attempting to reduce the size of a device. Batteries are typically the largest component in the device design. When it comes to medical devices...

Spinal Stimulator Could Improve Bladder Function for Paralyzed

October 17, 2014 10:47 am | by University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

People who have suffered spinal cord injuries are often susceptible to bladder infections, and those infections can cause kidney damage and even death. New UCLA research may go a long way toward solving the problem. A team of scientists studied...

Energy Harvesting ICs Power the Electric Body

October 17, 2014 8:30 am | by Niranjan Pathare, Sr. Market Development Manager, Battery Management Solutions, Texas Instruments | Articles | Comments

Homo sapiens are once again at a crucial juncture in their evolution timeline that started almost three million years ago. Evidence of the next phase is already here, but no one knows for sure how or where we will end up. But a term coined...

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Tiny Sound-Powered Chip Offers Innovative Medical Applications

October 16, 2014 12:08 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers can already power this prototype medical implant chip without wires by using ultrasound. Now they want to make it much smaller. Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor...

Surgical Robot Enables Brain Surgery Through the Cheek

October 16, 2014 10:47 am | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of...

The Pulse: Robotic Spoon Feeding and Watching You Sleep

October 16, 2014 10:28 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re feeding the disabled with a robotic spoon, fighting DME with an implant in the eye, improving restfulness by watching you sleep, and evaluating head impacts in real time. Robotic Spoon Feeds Disabled:...

Reprogrammed Skin Cells Could Lead to Alzheimer’s Cure

October 15, 2014 10:01 am | by University of Wollongong | News | Comments

Neuroscientists from UOW are reprogramming skin cells in order to discover new treatments and ultimately a cure for a range of devastating brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Schizophrenia and Motor Neurone Disease. Dr Lezanne Ooi, from the...

FDA Seeks to Address Cybersecurity Challenges in Medical Devices

October 14, 2014 2:39 pm | by Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures, CDRH | Blogs | Comments

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers...

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Stents Not Found to Help Prevent Future Strokes

October 14, 2014 10:24 am | by Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care | News | Comments

The risk of having another stroke is higher if patients, after dilation of their blood vessels in the brain, not only receive clot-inhibiting drugs, but also have small tubes called stents inserted. However, studies have provided no hint of a benefit from stenting, which is also referred to...

Gaming Through Clinical Trials

October 13, 2014 2:41 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

Recently, I saw a news piece out of Carnegie Mellon University where researchers supported the use of “video game” style trials of life science hypotheses to prevent the instance of error and fraud. Massive online laboratories would be established...

Biocoating Prevents Blood from Clotting on Implantables

October 13, 2014 11:42 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

From joint replacements to cardiac implants and dialysis machines, medical devices enhance or save lives on a daily basis. However, any device implanted in the body or in contact with flowing blood faces two critical challenges that can threaten...

Meaghan's Minute: Helping Stroke Victims Communicate

October 13, 2014 11:31 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Meaghans' Minute, researchers at East Tennessee State University have shown that a brain-computer interface (BCI) device can be beneficial to patients who have suffered a brainstem stroke and are experiencing “locked-in” syndrome and...

Radio Waves Sensor Technology Could Put Electronic ‘Touch’ on Prosthetics

October 10, 2014 11:51 am | by Stanford School of Engineering | News | Comments

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries. The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like...

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Erasing Memories with Light

October 10, 2014 10:52 am | by University of California - Davis | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together...

Detecting Depression in the Elderly

October 10, 2014 10:11 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Specialists at the Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM) of Mexico developed a system that achieved detecting depression in older adults, through monitoring their daily routine. This technology can be used as an auxiliary tool for the care of...

Implantable Medical Devices that Dissolve When No Longer Needed

October 10, 2014 9:53 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Electronic devices that dissolve completely in water, leaving behind only harmless end products, are part of a rapidly emerging class of technology pioneered by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Early results demonstrate...

A Remote Control for Neurons

October 9, 2014 9:43 am | by The Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A proposal to develop a new way to remotely control brain cells from Sarah Stanley, a Research Associate in Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, headed by Jeffrey M. Friedman, is among the first to receive funding...

Thought-Controlled Prosthesis

October 9, 2014 9:37 am | by Chalmers University of Technology | News | Comments

For the first time, robotic prostheses controlled via implanted neuromuscular interfaces have become a clinical reality. A novel osseointegrated (bone-anchored) implant system gives patients new opportunities in their daily life and professional...

Prosthetic Hand Restores the Sense of Touch

October 9, 2014 9:28 am | by Case Western Reserve University | News | Comments

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident 4 years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps. Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs rise when a researcher...

Portable Technology Brings Concussion Detection to the Sidelines

October 8, 2014 2:58 pm | by Emory University | Videos | Comments

Concussions from traumatic brain injury are a growing concern for organized sports and the military. Current diagnostic methods rely on subjective assessments at the time of injury that are inaccurate and laborious neuropsychological tests days...

Standardizing the Alzheimer's Blood Test

October 7, 2014 9:46 am | by UNT Health Science Center | News | Comments

The first standardized guidelines for the collection of blood to test for early Alzheimer's disease have been established by an international working group led by UNT Health Science Center. These guidelines are needed before the blood test...

Identifying the Brain’s Role in High Blood Pressure

October 6, 2014 2:32 pm | by University of Maryland Medical Center | News | Comments

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) and the Ottawa Heart Institute has uncovered a new pathway by which the brain uses an unusual steroid to control blood pressure. The study, which also suggests...

Yoga Could Enhance Brain-Computer Interface for Disabled

October 6, 2014 12:13 pm | by World Scientific | News | Comments

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation...

Researcher Earns Grant to Study Biomarkers, Advancement of Parkinson's

October 3, 2014 11:43 am | by Grand Valley State University | News | Comments

A researcher at Grand Valley State University has received a grant to continue studying if molecular biomarkers can be used to monitor the advancement of Parkinson's disease. Sok Kean Khoo, distinguished associate professor of molecular...

Genetic Test Reveals Risk of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

October 3, 2014 10:38 am | by Lund University | News | Comments

Many of those who are genetically predisposed to develop atrial fibrillation, which dramatically raises the risk of stroke, can be identified with a blood test. This is shown by new research from Lund University in Sweden. The number of people...

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