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Parkinson's Disease: Quickly Identifying Patients at Risk of Dementia

March 11, 2014 12:03 pm | by Université de Montréal | News | Comments

It may now be possible to identify the first-stage Parkinson’s patients who will go on to develop dementia, according to a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal by Dr. Oury Monchi, PhD, and his postdoctoral...

Information Technology Awakens the Sleep Disorder Diagnostic Industry

March 11, 2014 10:35 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

A large pool of undiagnosed patients and the growing population of the elderly in both Europe and North America point to a massive end-user market for sleep disorder diagnostics devices. The market is steadily drawing investors due to the...

Blood Test Identifies Those At-Risk for Cognitive Decline, Alzheimer's Within Three Years

March 10, 2014 11:06 am | by Georgetown University Medical Center | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered and validated a blood test that can predict with greater than 90 percent accuracy if a healthy person will develop mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease within three years. Described in Nature Medicine...

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Blind Can 'Hear' Colors and Shapes

March 10, 2014 11:00 am | by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem | News | Comments

What if you could "hear" colors? Or shapes? These features are normally perceived visually, but using sensory substitution devices (SSDs) they can now be conveyed to the brain noninvasively through other senses. At the Center for Human Perception...

Caring Robots Get the Green Light

March 7, 2014 2:23 pm | by Maria Lazarte, Communication Officer/Social Media Manager, ISO | Articles | Comments

From friendly Wall-E and helpful R2D2 to the dystopian worlds of the Matrix and Terminator, robots have captured our imagination and visions of the future for generations. But the time is fast approaching where interactions between humans...

Lifesaving Sensor for Full Bladders

March 7, 2014 11:30 am | by SINTEF | News | Comments

More than 220,000 people in Norway suffer from a neurological disease that means that they have difficulties with urinating and incontinence, and have problems controlling their bladders. About 3,000 of these are particularly badly affected...

Photos of the Day: Lifesaving Bladder Sensor

March 7, 2014 11:28 am | by SINTEF | News | Comments

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death. The first tests on humans will be carried out in April on patients with spinal injuries at Sunnaas Hospital. The tiny pressure sensor looks like a pinprick on the finger...

Researchers Use Computers to ‘See’ Neurons to Better Understand Brain Function

March 7, 2014 10:37 am | by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis | News | Comments

A study conducted by local high school students and faculty from the Department of Computer and Information Science in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis reveals new information about the motor circuits...

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Reducing Wait Times Could Improve Spinal Cord Stimulator Success for Chronic Pain

March 6, 2014 8:32 pm | by American Academy of Pain Medicine | News | Comments

Success rates soared to 75% for patients who waited less than 2 years for a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) implant, compared with 15% for patients whose implants happened 20 years after the onset of pain, according to a retrospective analysis...

Biomarkers of Cell Death in Alzheimer’s Reverse Course After Symptom Onset

March 6, 2014 3:55 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Three promising biomarkers being studied to detect Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages appear to undergo a surprising shift as patients develop symptoms of dementia, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis...

Ultra-High-Field MRI May Allow Earlier Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease

March 5, 2014 3:23 pm | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

New research shows that ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides detailed views of a brain area implicated in Parkinson's disease, possibly leading to earlier detection of a condition that affects millions worldwide. The results of...

Supply Chain Deficiencies Keeping Hospital Operating Rooms in the 'Stone Age'

March 5, 2014 11:02 am | by GHX | News | Comments

Despite the fact the healthcare industry is fueled by scientific advancement, too many hospitals find themselves stalled at a crossroads, struggling to embrace business-focused technologies and best practices that will allow them to flourish...

Infographic: Hospital Supply Chain Deficiencies

March 5, 2014 11:02 am | by GHX | News | Comments

The GHX survey of hospital senior executives indicates that operating room (OR) supply chain deficiencies have slowed organizational decision-making, increased costs and inefficiency -- and ultimately impact the delivery of patient care...

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Photos of the Day: Tumor Targeting Robot

March 5, 2014 9:50 am | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

Several years ago, J. Marc Simard, M.D., a professor and neurosurgeon at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, happened to be watching a television program on the medical use of sterile maggots. Finding it “fascinating...

Image-Guided Robot Targets Brain Tumors

March 5, 2014 9:45 am | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a prototype for an MR imaging-compatible robot designed to enable neurosurgeons to remove brain tumors. Using maggots to eat away dead human tissue may not seem to have much in common with neurosurgery, but the...

Safer Drug Delivery to the Brain

March 4, 2014 1:50 pm | by Lindsay Hock, Managing Editor, R&D Magazine | Articles | Comments

Delivering drugs into the brain to treat neurological diseases and disorders has been a challenge. The current best and easiest way to get drugs anywhere in the body is to take them orally or to administer them intravenously. But the challenges...

Carotid Artery MRI Helps Predict Likelihood of Strokes and Heart Attacks

March 4, 2014 12:22 pm | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

Noninvasive imaging of carotid artery plaque with MRI can accurately predict future cardiovascular events like strokes and heart attacks in people without a history of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study published online in the...

New Therapy Helps to Improve Audio and Visual Perception in Stroke Patients

March 4, 2014 12:09 pm | by Saarland University | News | Comments

A stroke can cause permanent damage to important parts of the brain, with the result that many stroke survivors require lifelong care and support. 'It is not uncommon for stroke patients to suffer from an awareness deficit or a reduced response...

Blockade Medical Announces 510(k) Clearance and CE Mark of Two New Additions to the Barricade Coil System

March 4, 2014 9:44 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Blockade Medical L.L.C., a privately held company focused on the development of catheter based therapeutic devices for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms, announced today two additions to the Barricade TM Coil System including an Enhanced...

Alzheimer's Buddy Program Pairs Patients, Students

March 4, 2014 1:26 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

At age 80, retired Chicago physician and educator Dan Winship is getting a bittersweet last chance to teach about medicine — only this time he's the subject. In the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, Winship is giving a young medical student...

Simple Blood Test Could Revolutionize Schizophrenia Diagnosis

March 3, 2014 12:09 pm | by Reuters | Videos | Comments

An inexpensive blood test to diagnose schizophrenia could be made available within two years, offering a groundbreaking alternative to conventional methods that rely on conversations between patients and doctors. Schizophrenia is a serious...

Could Future Devices Read Images from Our Brains?

March 3, 2014 12:01 pm | by TED | Videos | Comments

As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen studies how to show our most creative ideas on screens. And as a brain surgery patient herself, she is driven to know more about the neural activity that underlies invention...

Coating Could Prevent Blood Clots Associated with Implanted Devices

March 3, 2014 11:11 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Michigan has developed a material that could help prevent blood clots associated with catheters, heart valves, vascular grafts and other implanted biomedical devices. Blood clots at or...

Shaky Hand, Stable Spoon: Device Helps Essential Tremor Patients

February 28, 2014 1:40 pm | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

For people whose hands shake uncontrollably due to a medical condition, just eating can be a frustrating and embarrassing ordeal – enough to keep them from sharing a meal with others. But a small new study conducted at the University of...

Can the Damaged Brain Repair Itself?

February 28, 2014 12:02 pm | Videos | Comments

After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn't happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor...

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