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New Blood Test May Provide Earlier Parkinson's Diagnosis

April 6, 2015 9:37 am | by The Mount Sinai Hospital/Mount Sinai School of Medicine | News | Comments

A new blood test may more accurately identify blood signatures, or biomarkers, for Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a new study published in the journal Movement Disorders. The study, conducted by researchers at Mount Sinai and funded...

Deep Brain Stimulation Enhances Brain Cell Growth to Treat Dementia

April 6, 2015 9:31 am | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Pushing new frontiers in dementia research, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have found a new way to treat dementia by sending electrical impulses to specific areas of the brain to enhance the growth of...

Reconstructing Individual Neurons in 3D

April 2, 2015 2:34 pm | by Allen Institute | News | Comments

The Allen Institute for Brain Science is spearheading a landmark international effort to define and advance the state-of-the-art digital reconstruction and analysis of single neurons. The project launching today, called BigNeuron, aims to create...

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Real-Time Concussion Detection System

April 2, 2015 2:22 pm | by University of Illinois | News | Comments

Michigan football made headlines last fall when the coaching staff sent quarterback Shane Morris back on the field after being leveled by a Minnesota player. The coaching staff was unaware of the severity of the hit, which ultimately warranted...

Parkinson's Diagnosis by Typing on a Keyboard

April 2, 2015 2:03 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Analyzing people’s keystrokes as they type on a computer keyboard can reveal a great deal of information about the state of their motor function, according to a new study from MIT. In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports, the researchers...

Rapid Imaging of Functions in Living Brain

April 2, 2015 10:30 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body’s tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, Lihong Wang, PhD, and his...

Imaging the Autistic Mind

April 2, 2015 9:33 am | by Shilo Rea and Jocelyn Duffy, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

According to a 2014 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, autism — a complex developmental disorder — will affect one out of every 68 children born in the United States. The lifetime cost to care for a child with autism is estimated...

4 April Fool's Day Devices that May Not Be a Joke After All

April 1, 2015 3:28 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

Tech companies are some of the most committed pranksters of them all! Every April Fool’s Day they release a slew of joke products – and oftentimes it’s difficult to tell whether they’re pulling our legs or not. I assumed that medical technology...

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Bionic Hand Powered by Thoughts Alone

March 31, 2015 2:24 pm | by University of Houston | News | Comments

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a 56-year-old man whose...

Brain-Controlled Devices Mimic Natural Motor Control

March 31, 2015 9:17 am | by Cognitive Neuroscience Society | News | Comments

Neuroscientists are taking inspiration from natural motor control to design new prosthetic devices that can better replace limb function. In new work, researchers have tested a range of brain-controlled devices - from wheelchairs to robots...

'Wikipedia' for Neurons Indexes Physiological Information

March 31, 2015 9:01 am | by Jocelyn Duffy, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

The decades worth of data that has been collected about the billions of neurons in the brain is astounding. To help scientists make sense of this “brain big data,” researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used data mining to create...

High-Frequency Surpasses Traditional Spinal Cord Stimulation

March 29, 2015 10:00 am | by American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) | News | Comments

The first-ever randomized, controlled trial to compare spinal cord stimulation (SCS) technologies found that high-frequency SCS using 10 kHz (HF10) exceeded lower-frequency, traditional SCS in response rate and pain relief. Further, this was...

Pilot Study of a Neuromodulation System for Overactive Bladder

March 27, 2015 11:20 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Bioness, Inc. announced today that four (4) patients have successfully been implanted with the StimRouter Neuromodulation System, for an ongoing Canadian pilot study to evaluate device use in the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms…

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Enhancing Your Perception Through a Vest

March 26, 2015 3:19 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

Employing motors similar to those used in cell phones, this vest offers sensations to a person’s back based on the inputs provided. As illustrated through the video, that input can be generated by sound, news feeds, stock market data, or...

How Can the Maker Movement Drive Medical Innovation?

March 26, 2015 3:08 pm | by TEDMED | Videos | Comments

The Maker Movement has been defined as one driven by inventors, designers and tinkerers. It is fueled by a convergence of hackers and artisans who leverage open-source learning, contemporary design and powerful personal technology to solve...

Sea Slug Provides New Way of Analyzing Brain Data

March 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Scientists say our brains may not be as complicated as we once thought - and they're using sea slugs to prove it. Led by graduate student Angela Bruno, researchers at The University of Manchester and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine...

Robotic Supported Training Helps Chronic Spinal Patients Recover

March 26, 2015 10:50 am | by Kawasaki INnovation Gateway at SKYFRONT | News | Comments

Loss of strength and coordination may inhibit the mobility of spinal injury patients long after recovery in the nervous system is complete. An investigation by researchers in Germany and Japan has now demonstrated significant mobility improvements...

New Stent Devices Fight Strokes

March 26, 2015 10:26 am | by Loyola University Health System | News | Comments

Elizabeth Celli was experiencing a moderate-to-severe stroke when she arrived at Loyola University Medical Center’s Emergency Department. Mrs. Celli was weak on her left side, had difficulty speaking and was unable to walk. But after being...

Direct Brain Communication with Carbon Nanotubes

March 26, 2015 9:29 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Carbon nanotube fibers invented at Rice University may provide the best way to communicate directly with the brain. The fibers have proven superior to metal electrodes for deep brain stimulation and to read signals from a neuronal network...

Infographic: How Technology Is Saving Lives: The Healthcare Revolution

March 25, 2015 11:00 am | by Devin Jollimore, Training Coordinator, Mission Safety Services | News | Comments

Technology has many uses. The use of technology is increasing and with it so is the ability to use it to improve our quality of life. The medical and healthcare sectors have experienced rapid change and the positive impact this is having...

Device Protects Nerve Tissue During Bowel Surgery

March 25, 2015 10:32 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

After bowel surgery, more than half of the patients suffer from irreparable nerve damage. Now scientists have developed an assistance system that warns surgeons about the risk of inflicting possible injury during operations in the pelvic area...

Nanorobots Open the Blood-Brain Barrier for New Brain Treatments

March 25, 2015 10:27 am | by Université de Montréal | News | Comments

Magnetic nanoparticles can open the blood-brain barrier and deliver molecules directly to the brain, say researchers from the University of Montreal, Polytechnique Montréal, and CHU Sainte-Justine. This barrier runs inside almost all vessels...

'Simulant Gel' for Next-Generation Impact Injury Protection

March 25, 2015 9:34 am | by Denis Paiste, Materials Processing Center, MIT | News | Comments

Designing better protective gear against severe impacts for civilians and soldiers requires a detailed understanding of how soft tissues in the body actually respond to such impacts, whether from concussions, ballistic attacks, or blast wounds...

'Virtual Nose' May Reduce Simulator Sickness in Video Games

March 25, 2015 8:40 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

Virtual reality games often cause simulator sickness – inducing vertigo and sometimes nausea - but new research findings point to a potential strategy to ease the affliction. Various physiological systems govern the onset of simulator...

Deep Brain Stimulation Eases Parkinson's Pain

March 24, 2015 9:35 am | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

Patients with Parkinson disease who experienced pain before undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) had that pain improved or eliminated at eight years after surgery, although the majority of patients developed new...

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