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Benefits of the Connected Hospital

August 19, 2014 10:46 am | by Laird | Videos | Comments

The Connected Hospital is a vision of a fully integrated hospital where wireless technology allows care givers and patients to roam throughout the hospital while providing accurate and timely monitoring. The Connected Hospital collects the...

GE Healthcare: New Dementia Research Reveals Overwhelming Demand for “The Value of Knowing”

August 19, 2014 10:34 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Three out of four people would want to know what kind of neurological disorder they had even if there was no cure, according to new global research from GE Healthcare. An even higher percentage of respondents, 81%, would want to identify an...

Surgeons First in U.S. to Implant Device to Treat Cluster Headaches

August 18, 2014 4:08 pm | by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center | News | Comments

For those suffering excruciating pain from cluster headaches, relief may soon be available from an investigational device being studied in a national multicenter clinical trial. Recently, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical...

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Global Tissue Engineering and Regeneration Market to Reach $56.9 Billion in 2019

August 18, 2014 10:09 am | by BCC Research | News | Comments

BCC Research reveals in its new report, Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: Technologies and Global Markets, the global market for tissue engineering and regeneration is expected to grow to $56.9 billion by 2019, with a five-year compound...

Abbott & DOD to Develop Portable Blood Tests for Evaluating Concussions

August 18, 2014 10:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Abbott and the United States Department of Defense have announced a collaboration with the intent to develop portable blood tests to help evaluate potential concussions, also called mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). As part of a multi–phased...

Photos of the Day: Concussion Blood Test

August 18, 2014 9:59 am | by Abbott | News | Comments

Abbott's handheld, diagnostic analyzer is capable of performing a panel of commonly ordered blood tests on two or three drops of blood at the patient's side. Research suggests that certain proteins are released in the bloodstream following...

Dopamine replacement associated with impulse control increase in early Parkinson's

August 15, 2014 4:31 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. The study also found that initiation of dopamine replacement therapy, the most common treatment for PD, was associated with increasing frequency of impulse control disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness. The new findings ...

Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too

August 15, 2014 2:49 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats "see" with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology. In fact, the perception process in question could improve sonar and radar technology.

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New gene editing method may help correct muscular dystrophy

August 15, 2014 10:52 am | by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | News | Comments

Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct a mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. Researchers used a technique called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, which can precisely remove a mutation in DNA, allowing the body's DNA repair mechanisms to ...

Memories of errors foster faster learning

August 15, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.

New non-invasive technique controls size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier

August 14, 2014 4:14 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new technique developed by Elisa Konofagou, professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia Engineering, has demonstrated for the first time that the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be controlled using acoustic pressure—the pressure of an ultrasound beam—to let specific molecules through.

Bypass commands from the brain to legs through a computer

August 14, 2014 10:08 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Gait disturbance in individuals with spinal cord injury is attributed to the interruption of neural pathways from brain to the spinal locomotor center, whereas neural circuits locate below and above the lesion maintain most of their functions. An artificial connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects brain to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss.

“Trojan horse” treatment could beat brain tumors

August 13, 2014 2:55 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A "Trojan horse" treatment for an aggressive form of brain cancer, which involves using tiny nanoparticles of gold to kill tumour cells, has been successfully tested by scientists. The ground-breaking technique could eventually be used to treat glioblastoma multiforme, which is ...

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Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 11:21 am | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain's thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time. The findings contradict the concept that brain tumors need to grow their own blood vessels to keep themselves growing ...

Expert Panel Concludes Neurostimulation Can Be Life-Changing Therapy for Chronic Pain

August 12, 2014 11:07 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Chronic pain, which persists despite the fact that an injury has healed, can last for many months or years and may affect up to 15 percent of the adult population at any point in time. While it is a condition in its own right, it can be a component of other conditions. Neurostimulation, which involves stimulating pain-sensing nerves to convert painful sensations into nonpainful ones, offers ...

Research Shows Promise for New Nerve Repair Technique

August 11, 2014 4:08 pm | by Alison Perry, University of Kentucky | News | Comments

A multicenter study including University of Kentucky researchers found that a new nerve repair technique yields better results and fewer side effects than other existing techniques. Traumatic nerve injuries are common, and when nerves are severed, they do not heal on their own and must ...

Computer Software to Unravel Embryonic Development Cell by Cell

August 8, 2014 10:51 am | by Reuters | Videos | Comments

Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research campus are using a new type of computer software to track and image how a nervous system develops in unprecedented detail. The new system is able to track individual cells...

Cyborg Implants Antenna into Skull

August 8, 2014 10:06 am | by CNNMoney | Videos | Comments

Meet the cyborgs: People with technology implanted inside their bodies. Laurie Segall reports.                         

SyNAPSE Program Develops Advanced Brain-Inspired Chip

August 8, 2014 9:53 am | by DARPA | News | Comments

DARPA-funded researchers have developed one of the world’s largest and most complex computer chips ever produced — one whose architecture is inspired by the neuronal structure of the brain and requires only a fraction of the electrical power...

Human Skin Cells Reprogrammed as Neurons Regrow in Rats with Spinal Cord Injuries

August 8, 2014 9:34 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

While neurons normally fail to regenerate after spinal cord injuries, neurons formed from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that were grafted into rats with such injuries displayed remarkable growth throughout the length of the...

Scientists Use Lasers and Carbon Nanotubes to Look Inside Living Brains

August 7, 2014 4:24 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford | News | Comments

A team of Stanford scientists has developed an entirely non-invasive technique that provides a view of blood flow in the brain. The tool could provide powerful insights into strokes and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Some of the most damaging...

The Pulse: Moving Fluids Across Open Surfaces and Visualizing the 3D Heart

August 7, 2014 11:54 am | by Jonathan Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we’re moving fluids across active surfaces, visualizing a beating heart in 3D, preventing drowsy drivers, and getting a better night’s rest.             

Researchers Find Infectious Prion Protein in Urine of Patients with Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

August 7, 2014 11:47 am | by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | News | Comments

The misfolded and infectious prion protein that is a marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease – linked to the consumption of infected cattle meat – has been detected in the urine of patients with the disease by researchers at The University...

Scientists Develop Nasal Test for Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 11:43 am | by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian...

Infographic: What Engineers Think About Retirement

August 7, 2014 8:14 am | by Kasey Panetta & Eileen Whitmore, ECN Magazine | News | Comments

Retirement, that Golden Age of relaxation and hard-earned rest where you get to prop up your feet on the porch and yell at the neighborhood kids to get off your lawn. ECN wanted to know what engineers had planned for...    

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