Advertisement
Neurology
Subscribe to Neurology
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Deciphering the Noise in the Human Brain

April 13, 2015 10:38 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University School of Medicine | News | Comments

By directly recording electrical activity from the human brain, neuroscientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that distinct, distant groups of brain areas that support memory retrieval act in concert, even during sleep...

Video Game Storytelling Could Aid Autism Treatment

April 13, 2015 9:33 am | by Sage Publications | News | Comments

A wealth of studies have shown that violent video games contribute to antisocial and aggressive behavior. But what makes those games appealing in the first place? One possibility is that storytelling plays a role, particularly if it lets...

Touch-Sensing Neurons Are Multitaskers

April 13, 2015 9:27 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Two types of touch information — the feel of an object and the position of an animal’s limb — have long been thought to flow into the brain via different channels and be integrated in sophisticated processing regions. Now, with help from a specially...

Advertisement

An App to Help Students Stress Less

April 13, 2015 9:20 am | by University of Wollongong | News | Comments

The free app, ‘HSC Stress-Less’, was developed by psychology researchers at UOW with the assistance of high-achieving year 11 students at schools in the greater Sydney and Illawarra regions, including students at St George Christian School...

Wearable Device Slows Deadly Brain Tumors

April 9, 2015 10:00 am | by Josh Barney, University of Virginia | News | Comments

A wearable device that emits low-level electrical fields can slow the progression of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer, and extend patients’ lifespans, a major clinical trial at the University of Virginia School of Medicine...

Scanning Autism's Early Neuronal 'Neighborhood'

April 9, 2015 9:51 am | by San Diego State University | News | Comments

In early childhood, the neurons inside children's developing brains form connections between various regions of brain "real estate." As described in a paper published last week in the journal Biological Psychiatry, cognitive neuroscientists at...

Brain Scans Reveal How People 'Justify' Killing

April 9, 2015 9:43 am | by Monash University | News | Comments

A new study has thrown light on how people can become killers in certain situations, showing how brain activity varies according to whether or not killing is seen as justified. The study, led by Monash researcher Dr. Pascal Molenberghs...

More on the Maker Movement – How Can You Get Involved?

April 8, 2015 2:19 pm | by TEDMED | Videos | Comments

You may have caught our Great Challenges hangout last week on how the Maker Movement is transforming health and medicine. During this discussion, we explored how this trend is impacting the everyday work of creating a healthier world...

Advertisement

Depressed? Apps Lift Mood with Personalized Therapy

April 8, 2015 2:17 pm | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Feeling blue or anxious? Now, there's a mobile 'therapist' designed to understand you and suggest the ideal mini-app to lift your particular mood. The 'therapist' is Intellicare, a new suite of 12 interactive mini-apps to combat depression and...

What Can Brain-Controlled Prosthetics Tell Us About the Brain?

April 8, 2015 2:12 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

The ceremonial opening kick of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Sao Paolo, Brazil, which was performed--with the help of a brain-controlled exo-skeleton--by a local teen who had been paralyzed from the waste down due to a spinal cord injury, was a...

The Pulse: Stroke Rehab Music Glove and Drawn-On Sensors

April 8, 2015 11:57 am | by Jon Dipierro, Sean Fenske, and Sam Brusco | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we're touching our music glove-clad fingers together in time for stroke rehab, penning biosensors, seizing a golden opportunity with cancer-targeting nanoparticles, and avoiding embarrassing accidents with a bowel...

Developing Peripheral Devices for Your Brain

April 8, 2015 10:59 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

I hope a day will come when medical device designers seek to ask, "What ELSE can we do with this device that may go beyond the 'normal' limitations of a person." Who knows what that could bring in terms of new capabilities, new experiences...

Recharging Medical Devices in a Minute

April 7, 2015 3:05 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to developing a portable medical device, one of the constant challenges for design engineers is determining a suitable power source. The list of concerns that can be associated with the battery in a medical device can include...

Advertisement

You May Go Blind...but Your Brain Doesn't!

April 7, 2015 2:30 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

Restoring sight is tricky business, and this approach turns a blind eye to traditional rehabilitation for vision loss. Once the optic nerve is rendered useless, sadly there’s not much that can be done to regain vision. Sure, a bionic eye might...

Emailing Emotions on the 'Brain-Net'

April 7, 2015 12:10 pm | by Melissa Fassbender, Editor, PD&D, @melfass | Blogs | Comments

In February, I had the opportunity to attend Solidworks World 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona. Not only was it a great opportunity to escape Wisconsin’s sub zero temperatures (I was sunburned after the first day) but I was also able to meet with...

Photos of the Day: 3 Pretty Cool Assistive Robots

April 7, 2015 11:08 am | by Georgia Tech Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Professor Gil Weinberg has already built a band of robotic musicians in his Georgia Tech lab. Now he’s created a robot that can be attached to amputees, allowing its technology to be embedded into humans. The robotic drumming prosthesis has...

Exploring the Unknown Frontier of the Brain

April 7, 2015 9:00 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

To a large degree, your brain is what makes you... you. It controls your thinking, problem solving and voluntary behaviors. At the same time, your brain helps regulate critical aspects of your physiology, such as your heart rate and breathing...

New Advancements in 3D Designs for Neural Tissue Engineering

April 6, 2015 10:22 am | by Institute of Neural Regeration & Tissue Engineering | News | Comments

It is well known that neurological diseases and injuries pose some of the greatest challenges in modern medicine, with few if any options for effectively treating such diagnoses, but recent work suggests a unique approach for reconstructing damaged...

Heading Off Concussions

April 6, 2015 9:56 am | by University of California - Irvine | News | Comments

As a result of ongoing probes into the short- and long-term effects of concussions in football, other sports are looking into whether additional steps can be taken to protect their athletes. Among them is water polo, and a novel research venture...

Can Light Therapy Treat 'Gulf War Illness' in Veterans?

April 6, 2015 9:48 am | by Veterans Affairs Research Communications | News | Comments

Following up on promising results from pilot work, researchers at the VA Boston Healthcare System are testing the effects of light therapy on brain function in veterans with Gulf War Illness. Veterans in the study wear a helmet lined with...

New Blood Test May Provide Earlier Parkinson's Diagnosis

April 6, 2015 9:37 am | by The Mount Sinai Hospital/Mount Sinai School of Medicine | News | Comments

A new blood test may more accurately identify blood signatures, or biomarkers, for Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a new study published in the journal Movement Disorders. The study, conducted by researchers at Mount Sinai and funded...

Deep Brain Stimulation Enhances Brain Cell Growth to Treat Dementia

April 6, 2015 9:31 am | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Pushing new frontiers in dementia research, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have found a new way to treat dementia by sending electrical impulses to specific areas of the brain to enhance the growth of...

Reconstructing Individual Neurons in 3D

April 2, 2015 2:34 pm | by Allen Institute | News | Comments

The Allen Institute for Brain Science is spearheading a landmark international effort to define and advance the state-of-the-art digital reconstruction and analysis of single neurons. The project launching today, called BigNeuron, aims to create...

Real-Time Concussion Detection System

April 2, 2015 2:22 pm | by University of Illinois | News | Comments

Michigan football made headlines last fall when the coaching staff sent quarterback Shane Morris back on the field after being leveled by a Minnesota player. The coaching staff was unaware of the severity of the hit, which ultimately warranted...

Parkinson's Diagnosis by Typing on a Keyboard

April 2, 2015 2:03 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Analyzing people’s keystrokes as they type on a computer keyboard can reveal a great deal of information about the state of their motor function, according to a new study from MIT. In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports, the researchers...

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading