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Test Could Predict Which Teen Boys Get Depression

February 18, 2014 11:52 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help identify those who will later develop major depression, a new study says. Researchers measured the stress hormone cortisol in teenage boys and found that ones with...

Brain Tumor Removal Through a Hole Smaller than a Dime

February 18, 2014 11:17 am | by Houston Methodist Neurological Institute | News | Comments

More than two decades ago, Ryan Vincent had open brain surgery to remove a malignant brain tumor, resulting in a lengthy hospital stay and weeks of recovery at home. Recently, neurosurgeons at Houston Methodist Hospital, through a...   

Scientists Study New Ways to Restore Hand Movement After Paralysis

February 14, 2014 1:51 pm | by Elaine Schmidt, UCLA | News | Comments

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has awarded UCLA researchers Dr. Daniel Lu (Brentwood) and Dr. Reggie Edgerton (Bel Air) a $6 million, five-year grant to explore new therapies for the approximately 273,000...

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Rebuilding the Brain After Stroke

February 14, 2014 12:23 pm | by Henry Ford Health System | News | Comments

Enhancing the brain's inherent ability to rebuild itself after a stroke with molecular components of stem cells holds enormous promise for treating the leading cause of long-term disability in adults. Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Scientific Director...

Laser Technology Lets Parkinsonism Patients Walk Again

February 13, 2014 3:07 pm | by Reuters | Videos | Comments

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have developed a device that re-routes brain signals in Parkinsonism disorder patients, allowing them to regain mobility. For at least one patient in Florida, the device is ...            

Brain Process Takes Paper Shape

February 13, 2014 2:31 pm | by Michael Bishop, Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A paper-based device that mimics the electrochemical signaling in the human brain has been created by a group of researchers from China. The thin-film transistor (TFT) has been designed to ...             

Synthetic Voices, as Unique as Fingerprints

February 13, 2014 11:29 am | by TED | Videos | Comments

Many of those with severe speech disorders use a computerized device to communicate. Yet they choose between only a few voice options. That's why Stephen Hawking has an American accent, and why many people end up with the same voice, often to ...

Mind-Controlled Quadcopter Brings New Possibilities for the Disabled

February 13, 2014 10:56 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), biomedical engineer Bin He and his team at the University of Minnesota have created a brain-computer interface with the goal of helping people with disabilities, such as paralysis, regain ...

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Brilliant Blue G May Shine in Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries

February 12, 2014 11:12 am | by Toni Baker, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University | News | Comments

A close cousin of the dye that makes fabric, M&M's and sports drinks blue may improve recovery from traumatic brain injuries. Falls, motor vehicle accidents, collisions, assaults, and war injuries result in ...     

Optogenetic Toolkit Goes Multicolor

February 11, 2014 4:31 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Optogenetics is a technique that allows scientists to control neurons’ electrical activity with light by engineering them to express light-sensitive proteins. Within the past decade, it has ...          

First Guidelines Issued to Prevent Stroke in Women

February 6, 2014 8:16 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Just as heart attack symptoms may differ between men and women, so do stroke risks. Now, the American Heart Association has issued its first guidelines for preventing strokes in women. They focus on birth control, pregnancy, depression and...

Merging Healthcare with Modern Communications Technology

February 6, 2014 2:07 pm | by Carrie Yang, Senior Healthcare Analyst, Results Healthcare | Blogs | Comments

Modern communications technology is starting to have a real impact on the way patients are managing their diseases and the delivery of healthcare. By collecting and transmitting real-time data, it is now possible to get a much better picture...

The Pulse: Powering Implants with the Heart & Playing Stroke Hero

February 6, 2014 11:22 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on The Pulse, we are powering implants with the heart, vacuuming out blood clots, controlling the TV remote with a wink, and playing stroke education video games. This episode features...        

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Bionic Hand Gives Amputees A New Sense Of Touch

February 6, 2014 9:50 am | by NTDTV | Videos | Comments

A prototype prosthetic hand containing sensors, wired to nerves in amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen's arm, has given him the ability to feel objects for the first time in nine years. Now its creators plan to miniaturise the electronics required...

Photos of the Day: Feeling Prosthetics

February 6, 2014 9:11 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

To feel what you touch – that's the holy grail for artificial limbs. In a step toward that goal, European researchers created a robotic hand that let an amputee feel differences between a bottle, a baseball and a mandarin orange.      

Artificial Hand that Feels What You Touch

February 6, 2014 3:15 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

It's not quite the bionics of science fiction, but European researchers have created a robotic hand that gave an amputee a sense of touch he hadn't felt in a decade. The experiment lasted only a week, but it let the patient feel if different...

Researchers Discover How Brain Regions Work Together, or Alone

February 3, 2014 9:18 am | by Stanford School of Engineering | News | Comments

Our brains have billions of neurons grouped into different regions. These regions often work alone, but sometimes must join forces. How do regions communicate selectively? Stanford researchers may have solved a riddle about the inner workings...

Study Finds Differences in Concussion Risk Between Football Helmets

January 31, 2014 11:54 am | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Football helmets can be designed to reduce the risk of concussions, according to a new study by some of the nation's leading concussion researchers published today in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The study analyzed head impact data compiled...

UCSF Team Reveals How the Brain Recognizes Speech Sounds

January 31, 2014 11:15 am | by University of California - San Francisco | News | Comments

UC San Francisco researchers are reporting a detailed account of how speech sounds are identified by the human brain, offering an unprecedented insight into the basis of human language. The finding, they said, may add to our understanding...

Photos of the Day: Studying Sleep at Home

January 31, 2014 10:48 am | by SleepRate | News | Comments

SleepRate has released the first affordable sleep improvement solution based on proprietary sleep analysis algorithms as well as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI) protocols exclusively licensed from Stanford University School...

Personal Device Tracks and Assists with Sleep Issues

January 31, 2014 10:47 am | by SleepRate | News | Comments

SleepRate, a company that helps people sleep better to improve their quality of life, has released the first affordable sleep improvement solution based on proprietary sleep analysis algorithms as well as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for...

Mind-Controlled Music Player for Disabled

January 30, 2014 2:55 pm | by University of Malta | News | Comments

Imagine controlling a music player just by looking at your laptop. Engineers from the Department of Systems and Control Engineering and the Centre for Biomedical Cybernetics at the University of Malta led by Prof. Kenneth Camilleri are...  

Crash-Testing Concussion Sensors

January 30, 2014 12:23 pm | by Michigan Engineering | Videos | Comments

How head-impact sensors might one day help athletes, coaches and doctors identify more dangerous hits that could lead to concussions. Michigan Engineering researchers are helping to test a new high-profile device. In an effort to improve...

Testing Head-Impact Sensors to Understand Concussions

January 30, 2014 12:23 pm | by Nicole Casal Moore, Michigan Engineering | News | Comments

The head of a crash-test dummy wore a football helmet as it hung upside-down on a laboratory drop tower. James Eckner, M.D., stood on a ladder next to it holding its tether. He counted to five and let go. The bust smacked into another just...

Why Are Consumers Not Using Health Apps?

January 29, 2014 3:12 pm | by Asif Khan, CEO, Caremerge | Blogs | Comments

NPR recently released a great article on health apps and their usage to date. The article refers to a report by IMS Institute for Health Informatics that states that (as per iTunes Store June 2013) there are about 43,689 Apps categorized...

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