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'Lighting Up' Brain Cancer Cells to Guide Surgery

January 30, 2015 10:43 am | by Wolters Kluwer Health | News | Comments

Two new fluorescent dyes attracted to cancer cells may help neurosurgeons more accurately localize and completely resect brain tumors, suggests a study in the February issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of...   

Detecting Concussions and Other Brain Injuries

January 29, 2015 4:21 pm | by TEDMED | Videos | Comments

Neurosurgeon and PhD researcher Uzma Samadani is the cofounder of Oculogica, a neurodiagnostic company that specializes in using eye-tracking technology to detect concussions and other brain injuries that are invisible to radiologic scans. She...

Making Science Fiction a Reality: 3 Medical Devices Straight from Star Trek

January 29, 2015 3:56 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

While we haven’t quite been able to achieve light-speed travel or teleportation just yet, science fiction has forecasted a number of technologies that are anything but fiction. Star Trek in particular offered surprising insight into technological...

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If A Single Neuron Fires in the Brain, Will Anyone See It?

January 29, 2015 11:12 am | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

Let me introduce Andy Gotshalk, CEO of Blackrock NeuroMed. With almost 20 years of experience in the medical device industry, Gotshalk began as a field service engineer, rising through the ranks to become the Sales/Operation manager for the...

Eye-Tracking Technology Detects Concussions and Head Injury Severity

January 29, 2015 10:09 am | by NYU Langone Medical Center | News | Comments

New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. Neuroscientists and concussion experts from NYU Langone and elsewhere... 

First Patients Enrolled in Pivotal Study for Nerve Block Technology

January 28, 2015 10:17 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Neuros Medical, Inc., a medical device company, announced it has enrolled the first patients in its pivotal clinical trial to evaluate the Company’s patented Altius System High Frequency Nerve Block technology for the management...

Defining Impact: Creating Designs That Are Up to Standard

January 28, 2015 10:04 am | by Christian Defeo, eSupplier Manager, Newark element14 | Blogs | Comments

element14’s Sudden Impact challenge continues on, and the competitors are targeting different sports and designing a myriad of devices. Part of the challenge is to create solutions that align with the scientific and health communities...

Low-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Parkinson’s Symptoms

January 28, 2015 9:17 am | by University of Chicago Medical Center | News | Comments

Parkinson’s disease patients treated with low-frequency deep brain stimulation show significant improvements in swallowing dysfunction and freezing of gait over typical high-frequency treatment. The study, published in Neurology on Jan 27...

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Brain-to-Brain Communication has Arrived: How We Did It

January 27, 2015 9:00 am | by TEDGlobal | Videos | Comments

You may remember neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis — he built the brain-controlled exoskeleton that allowed a paralyzed man to kick the first ball of the 2014 World Cup. What’s he working on now? Building ways for two minds (rats and monkeys...

Getting Inside: Implantables and Technologies that Deliver Them

January 27, 2015 8:30 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Ximedica, Interface Catheter Solutions, Bal Seal Engineering, Inc., Avalon Laboratories, LLC | Articles | Comments

There are several significant drivers of innovation in the medical device space. Miniaturization is certainly a major one, while moving technology out of the hospital and enabling it to be used at home and on the go is another. In addition, there...

This Neurostimulator Makes People Cry

January 26, 2015 11:11 am | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | News | Comments

A Stanford University fellow developed implantable neurostimulators to create tears for people who suffer from dry eye. The devices, a little larger than a fingernail, work in pairs. One is inserted into the mucous membrane in the...

Cochlear Implant Users Can Still Feel the Beat in Music

January 26, 2015 10:29 am | by Georgetown University Medical Center | News | Comments

People who use cochlear implants for profound hearing loss do respond to certain aspects of music, contrary to common beliefs and limited scientific research, says a research team headed by an investigator at Georgetown University Medical...

Using Your Thoughts to Control Wireless Devices

January 26, 2015 10:15 am | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | News | Comments

British company Flexctrl Ltd. is crowdfunding a headset designed to enable users to control wireless devices with brain activity. The indiegogo campaign, which began on Dec. 23, has raised £741 ($1,112) out of its £125,000 ($187,000) goal as of...

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Diaper Compound Could Enhance Brain Cell Imaging

January 23, 2015 3:13 pm | by NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke | News | Comments

Pour, mix, set, add water and voila: highly detailed images of the inside of cells. A study, partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, showed that a modified form of the superabsorbent chemical used in disposable diapers can expand...

Creating a Smarter Connection between Man and Machine

January 23, 2015 1:12 pm | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | SurModics, Inc. | News | Comments

As smart technology becomes more and more common in the medical field, new materials are developed to facilitate connection between the body and the devices that help it thrive. A new conductive coating could enable electrode miniaturization...

Live Broadcast from Inside the Nerve Cell

January 23, 2015 10:49 am | by Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry | News | Comments

Scientists estimate that our brain consists of about ten to one hundred billions of nerve cells. In order to fulfill their respective tasks as long as possible, these cells have to constantly control their internal proteins with regard to quality and...

Sensory Substitution Devices Create 'Mental Images' for Blind Patients

January 23, 2015 9:18 am | by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem | News | Comments

Studying the brain activity of blind people, scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem are challenging the standard view of how the human brain specializes to perform different kinds of tasks, and shedding new light on how our brains can...

Robotic Hand Learns Fine Movements from Monkeys

January 22, 2015 9:51 am | by German Primate Center | News | Comments

Tying shoelaces, stirring coffee, writing letters, playing the piano.  From the usual daily routine to demanding activities: Our hands are used more frequently than any other body part. Through our highly developed fine motor skills, we are able to...

'Serious Games' Use Virtual Reality for a Wide Array of Treatments

January 22, 2015 9:32 am | by The University of Huddersfield | News | Comments

Researchers and practitioners in the burgeoning area of ‘serious games’ are using video game-based technologies such as virtual reality – more widely associated with entertainment – in order to make breakthroughs in many aspects of healthcare...

Treating Chronic Conditions with Neuromodulation

January 22, 2015 9:00 am | by International Neuromodulation Society | News | Comments

The International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress will feature traditional and cutting-edge ways to address chronic disease through interfacing with the body’s nervous system. The congress is expected to draw 1,500 scientists...

Using Light to Beat the Winter Blues

January 21, 2015 10:13 am | by Philips Healthcare | News | Comments

Join Royal Philips, the global leader in lighting to beat the most depressing day of the year. According to a study by Cliff Arnall, the most depressing date of the year is today and is amongst others due to the weather conditions and lack of sun...

Portable Stimulator Being Tested on Parkinson's Patients

January 21, 2015 8:43 am | by University of Gothenburg | News | Comments

Parkinson's disease is a slowly degenerative neurological disease that is expressed as impaired motor control, tremors, stiffness and, in later stages, problems with balance. The symptoms are caused by a lack of the signal substance dopamine and...

Multimodal Fibers Deliver Drugs and Optical Signals Directly to the Brain

January 20, 2015 11:58 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study — not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously. Conventional neural probes are designed to record a single...

The Benefits of the ASM Medical Materials Database

January 20, 2015 10:39 am | by Linda Vermillion, Product Manager, ASM International | Articles | Comments

ASM International, the world's largest professional society for materials engineering, and Granta Design, leaders in materials information technology, today announced a new Surgical module in the ASM Medical Materials Database. This new resource...

Wearable Sensor Provides Long-Term EKG and EMG Monitoring

January 20, 2015 10:05 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate...

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