Advertisement
Neurology
Subscribe to Neurology
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

New Approach to Global Health Challenges

September 27, 2013 12:00 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

MIT’s new Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) is tackling some of the world’s biggest health challenges through an interdisciplinary approach that will seek new ways to diagnose and treat infectious, neurological and cardiovascular diseases.

Researchers Develop New Type of Fluorescent Camera for Blood Diagnostics, Brain Mapping

September 27, 2013 10:49 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

Fluorescence imaging is the most widely used method for analyzing the molecular composition of biological specimens. Target molecules, when they are present, can be "tagged" with a fluorescent label and made visible. This highly sensitive technique, which is used in screening blood for cancer cells and studying biochemical reactions, is very good at detecting molecules present in extremely low concentrations.

Medical Devices: How Secure Are They?

September 26, 2013 4:21 pm | by Jon Jarboe, Senior Technical Manager, Coverity | Articles | Comments

Medical devices are increasingly dependent on software, evolving from the use of a simple two-transistor circuit for early artificial cardiac pacemakers to sophisticated modern systems supporting infusion pumps, electrocardiogram analysis, and image-guided surgery.

Advertisement

New Study Shows How ICU Ventilation May Trigger Mental Decline

September 26, 2013 2:51 pm | by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine | News | Comments

At least 30 percent of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) suffer some form of mental dysfunction as reflected in anxiety, depression, and especially delirium. In mechanically-ventilated ICU patients, the incidence of delirium is particularly high, about 80 percent, and may be due in part to damage in the hippocampus, though how ventilation is increasing the risk of damage and mental impairment has remained elusive.

Study Shows Declining Prices for Major Implantable Devices

September 26, 2013 2:35 pm | by AdvaMed | News | Comments

The Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) today released a new study on pricing trends for implantable medical devices that shows average prices have declined significantly for major categories of implantable medical devices from 2007 through 2011.

Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

September 25, 2013 10:07 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | News | Comments

Researchers are using computer simulations to investigate how ultrasound and tiny bubbles injected into the bloodstream might break up blood clots, limiting the damage caused by a stroke in its first hours. Strokes are the most common cause of long-term disability in the United States and the third most common cause of death.

Researchers Successfully Test Model for Implant Device Reactions

September 24, 2013 10:13 am | by University of Texas at Arlington | News | Comments

A team from the University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints.

Breakthrough Offers First Direct Measurement of Spinal Cord Myelin in MS

September 24, 2013 10:06 am | by Jessica Studeny, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Researchers have made an exciting breakthrough – developing a first-of-its-kind imaging tool to examine myelin damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). An extremely difficult disease to diagnose, the tool will help physicians diagnose patients earlier, monitor the disease’s progression, and evaluate therapy efficacy.

Advertisement

New Password in a Heartbeat

September 24, 2013 9:47 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

Pacemakers, insulin pumps, defibrillators and other implantable medical devices often have wireless capabilities that allow emergency workers to monitor patients. But these devices have a potential downside: They can be hacked. Researchers at Rice University have come up with a secure way to dramatically cut the risk that an implanted medical device could be altered remotely without authorization.

Hospitals want more cybersecurity from device makers

September 24, 2013 7:29 am | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Seven out of 9 hospitals and healthcare providers surveyed "strongly" agreed that medical device makers need to step up their cybersecurity and privacy practices, according to a study conducted by the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions.   

Photo of the Day: Mind over Prosthetics

September 23, 2013 11:45 am | by NC State University | News | Comments

Researchers from NC State and the University of Houston (UH) are hoping to solve the “disconnect” between the mind’s signals and the response (or lack thereof) from a prosthetic device with a new four-year, $1.2 million collaborative project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Researchers Seek to Control Prosthetic Legs with Neural Signals

September 23, 2013 11:44 am | by Matt Shipman, NC State University | News | Comments

Most people don’t think about the difference between walking across the room and walking up a flight of stairs. Their brains (and their legs) automatically adjust to the new conditions. But for people using prosthetic legs, there is no automatic link between their bodies and the prosthetics that they need to negotiate the new surroundings.

Worldwide Medtech Sales Forecast to Reach $455 Billion by 2018

September 23, 2013 9:00 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

The medical device and diagnostics market is set to grow at 4.5 percent per year (CAGR) between 2012 and 2018, totalling $455 billion in 2018, according to the newly-released EvaluateMedTech World Preview 2013, Outlook to 2018: The Future of Medtech report from market intelligence firm Evaluate Ltd.

Advertisement

The Coherex WaveCrest LAA Occluder

September 19, 2013 11:49 am | by Coherex Medical | Videos | Comments

The WaveCrest LAA Occluder is an implantable device that seals off the LAA opening so clots cannot escape into the blood stream and cause a stroke. It is a one-time treatment option for patients who would otherwise be on a lifetime regimen of anticoagulation therapy.

Florida Hospital Collaborates with VTT of Finland to Explore Research for Early Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease

September 19, 2013 11:36 am | by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) | News | Comments

In an effort to better understand the development of Alzheimer’s disease, Florida Hospital Neuroscience Institute and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland are collaborating to identify the biomarker assay that may predict early onsets of the disease.

Researchers Develop a Method that Automatically Delimits Areas of the Brain in Medical Images

September 19, 2013 11:30 am | by Universidad Publica de Navarra | News | Comments

The researchers have developed a method that improves the delimitation of tumors in medical images. As they explained, “when the doctor decides where tumor tissue should be separated from healthy tissue, our algorithm ensures that he/she is never going choose the worst option because the best solution is automatically offered.”

Keystone Heart’s TriGuard Cerebral Protection Device Receives CE Marking

September 19, 2013 10:50 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

The CE marked TriGuard is the only device designed to cover all three aortic cerebral branches to minimize the risk of cerebral damage during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) and other cardiovascular procedures. It is the only system designed for placement via one of two femoral artery access ports.

Voice-Analyzing App Scans Football Players for Concussion

September 18, 2013 12:00 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A voice-analysis program run on a tablet could help high school and youth coaches recognize concussions on the sidelines of football and other high-impact sport games. After identifying concussions in collegiate boxers in a preliminary study, University of Notre Dame researchers will soon test the app on approximately 1,000 youth and high school football players.

New Molecular Imaging Agents Being Developed for Fluorescence-Guided Brain Cancer Surgery

September 17, 2013 12:00 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Surgery is the cornerstone of oncology treatment, and molecularly-targeted fluorescent imaging agents have the potential to guide surgical resection by highlighting the biological margins of the disease. However, development and testing of such molecular imaging agents has been lacking.

NIH-Funded Study Suggests Brain Is Hard-Wired for Chronic Pain

September 17, 2013 11:03 am | by NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke | News | Comments

The structure of the brain may predict whether a person will suffer chronic low back pain, according to researchers who used brain scans. The results, published in the journal Pain, support the growing idea that the brain plays a critical role in chronic pain, a concept that may lead to changes in the way doctors treat patients.

Neuros Medical Receives Regulatory Approval for Implantable Device

September 16, 2013 11:30 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Neuros Medical, Inc., a medical device company announced it has received an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for their implantable generator. The device, named Altius™, delivers patented high frequency Electrical Nerve Block™ technology for patients suffering from chronic pain.

High Rate of Spinal Injuries Among Troops Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan

September 16, 2013 11:11 am | by Wolters Kluwer Health | News | Comments

Spinal injuries are present in 1 out of 9 U.S. military personnel sustaining combat injuries in Iraq or Afghanistan -- a much higher rate than in previous wars, according to a report in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Schizophrenia: It’s in the Wiring of the Brain

September 16, 2013 10:20 am | by Elsevier | News | Comments

Just as wires must be insulated to effectively carry electrical impulses, nerve cells must be insulated by myelin to effectively transmit neural impulses. Using typical magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, one can visually distinguish parts of the brain that look white and parts that look gray.

Scientists Creating New Diagnostic and Bioinformatics Tools for Psychotic Disorders

September 16, 2013 10:05 am | by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) | News | Comments

A new EU project, METSY, develops and applies neuroimaging and bioinformatics tools to study how lipid metabolism is connected to psychotic disorders and metabolic co-morbidities such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The overall objective is to identify, prioritize and evaluate multi-modal blood and neuroimaging biomarkers...

Virginia Tech Carilion Researchers Find Surprising Relationships in Brain Signaling

September 12, 2013 11:48 am | by Paula Byron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

If the violins were taken away from the musicians performing Beethoven's 9th symphony, the resulting composition would sound very different. If the violins were left on stage but the violinists were removed, the same mutant version of the symphony would be heard. But what if it ended up sounding like "Hey Jude" instead?

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading