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Keystone Heart's TriGuardT Cerebral Protection Device Receives CE Marking

September 9, 2013 4:15 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Keystone Heart, a leader in the development of cerebral protection devices for interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery procedures, announced today that its TriGuardT Cerebral Protection Device has received CE Marking, enabling the company to commercially market the TriGuard in Europe and other territories.

Medtronic traces surgical kit possibly contaminated with fatal brain disease

September 6, 2013 12:02 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Medtronic is working with New England hospitals and government health officials to track the movement of surgical medical equipment involved in several cases of possible patient exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare and fatal relative to the more commonly known "mad cow" disease.

Robot-assisted surgery: Mazor touts landmark Parkinson's patient treated

September 4, 2013 7:29 am | by Mass Device | News | Comments

For the 1st time Mazor Robotics' Renaissance robot-assisted surgical system system was used to to treat a Parkinson's patient, implanting a battery-sized neurostimulator that delivers mild electrical stimulation to targeted areas of the brain. The landmark procedure took place at a Florida hospital earlier this month.

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Toward an Early Diagnostic Tool for Alzheimer’s Disease

September 3, 2013 10:23 am | by Stéphanie Thibault, INRS | News | Comments

Despite all the research done on Alzheimer’s, there is still no early diagnostic tool for the disease. By looking at the brain wave components of individuals with the disease, Professor Tiago H. Falk of INRS’s Centre Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications has identified a promising avenue of research that may not only help diagnose the disease, but also assess its severity.

Creating a 'Window' to the Brain

September 3, 2013 9:55 am | by University of California - Riverside | News | Comments

A team of University of California, Riverside researchers have developed a novel transparent skull implant that literally provides a "window to the brain", which they hope will eventually open new treatment options for patients with life-threatening neurological disorders, such as brain cancer and traumatic brain injury.

Significantly Improving the Treatment of Brain Cancer with a Robot

August 29, 2013 2:39 pm | by Worcester Polytechnic Institute | News | Comments

With a five-year, $3 million R01 award from the National Institutes of Health, through the National Cancer Institute, a team of researchers led by Gregory Fischer, Ph.D. will test a new, minimally invasive approach to treating brain tumors that promises to accurately destroy malignant tissue while leaving surrounding tissue unaffected.

Brain Inflammation Linked to More Severe Parkinson’s Symptoms

August 29, 2013 11:03 am | by Michigan State University | News | Comments

Reversing inflammation in the fluid surrounding the brain’s cortex may provide a solution to the complex riddle of Parkinson’s, according to researchers who have found a link between pro-inflammatory biomarkers and the severity of symptoms such as fatigue, depression and anxiety in patients with the chronic disease.

Scientists Find Clue to Age-Related Memory Loss

August 29, 2013 10:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have found a compelling clue in the quest to learn what causes age-related memory problems, and to one day be able to tell if those misplaced car keys are just a senior moment or an early warning of something worse. Wednesday's report offers evidence that age-related memory loss really is a distinct condition from pre-Alzheimer's...

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Growing Brains on Demand

August 29, 2013 9:54 am | by Institute of Molecular Biotechnology | News | Comments

Complex human brain tissue has been successfully developed in a three-dimensional culture system established in an Austrian laboratory. The method described in the current issue of NATURE allows pluripotent stem cells to develop into cerebral organoids – or "mini brains" – that consist of several discrete brain regions.

First Patient Implant of Stroke Treatment Device

August 28, 2013 10:53 am | by MicroTransponder | News | Comments

The Vivistim System has been developed to treat stroke patients that experience an upper-limb deficit following their stroke. These are patients that are unable to fully recover the use of their upper-limbs at least 6 months following their stroke. A United Kingdom based clinical trial is underway using the Vivistim System in the Glasgow and Newcastle areas.

Researcher Controls Colleague’s Motions in 1st Human Brain-to-Brain Interface

August 28, 2013 10:25 am | by Doree Armstrong and Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

University of Washington researchers have performed what they believe is the first noninvasive human-to-human brain interface, with one researcher able to send a brain signal via the Internet to control the hand motions of a fellow researcher.  

Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans: A Pilot Study

August 28, 2013 10:23 am | by University of Washington | Videos | Comments

A video of example trials from a pilot study of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans conducted by Rajesh Rao, Andrea Stocco, and colleagues at the U of Washington, Seattle. Using electrical brain recordings and a form of magnetic stimulation, Rajesh Rao sent a brain signal to Andrea Stocco on the other side of the UW campus, causing Stocco’s finger to move on a keyboard.

Combating Concussions

August 28, 2013 10:01 am | by San Diego State University | News | Comments

In the United States there are millions of sports related concussions each year, but many go undiagnosed because for some athletes, the fear of being benched trumps the fear of permanent brain damage, and there is no objective test available to accurately diagnose concussions on the sidelines. Researchers at San Diego State University have set out to change that.

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InVivo tanks on push-back for spinal injury trial

August 27, 2013 4:05 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

InVivo Therapeutics announced a push-back on its time-lines for enrollment in a clinical trial examining its spinal cord injury treatment, a move that brought NVIV shares down by nearly half today. InVivo announced that, under the terms of its FDA investigational device exemption, each trial patient must be followed for 3 months...

Mind-Reading Headset Monitors Brainwaves

August 27, 2013 11:49 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on Kickstarter, we are monitoring our brainwaves and moving objects with just our thoughts with the Emotiv Insight, a 5-channel, wireless headset from Tan Le, founder and CEO.             

Non-Invasive Technology Helps Patients 'Walk'

August 27, 2013 11:47 am | by University of Houston | News | Comments

The BMI works by interpreting brain waves that allow patients to control, with their thoughts, robotic legs and below-elbow amputees to control neuroprosthetic limbs. Contreras-Vidal has partnered with Dr. Robert Grossman at TMHRI on the research project.

Moving Objects with Your Mind

August 27, 2013 11:45 am | by Melissa Fassbender, Associate Editor, PD&D | Articles | Comments

Brain imaging equipment has been around since the 1930s, but we have made very little progress in understanding the human brain, explains Tan Le, Founder and CEO of Emotiv Insight. With almost a decade of experience in the field, she hopes to change this.

Spinal Modulation Enrolls First Patient in U.S. Pivotal Study of the Investigational Axium Neurostimulator System for Chronic Pain

August 27, 2013 11:30 am | by Spinal Modulation | News | Comments

Spinal Modulation, Inc., a privately held global medical device company, today announced the first patient enrollment in its U.S. pivotal clinical trial. The ACCURATE study is a prospective, randomized, multi-center, controlled trial that will evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Axium™ Neurostimulator System for the treatment of chronic lower limb pain.

MIT Launches the Center for Neurobiological Engineering

August 27, 2013 10:34 am | by Center for Neurobiological Engineering | News | Comments

“Reverse-engineering the brain” is one of the National Academy of Engineering’s Grand Challenges for the 21st Century, and last spring President Barack Obama renewed the call for more advanced neurological research by launching the “BRAIN” initiative.

System Lets Surgeons Image the Brain While they Operate On It

August 27, 2013 12:00 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A new system for visualizing the brain during surgery is helping neurosurgeons more accurately diagnose and treat patients and is even allowing them to perform some procedures that until now have been extremely difficult or even impossible.  

Combination of Two Imaging Techniques Allows New Insights into Brain Function

August 26, 2013 10:16 am | by Universitaet Tübingen | News | Comments

The ability to measure brain functions non-invasively is important both for clinical diagnoses and research in Neurology and Psychology. Two main imaging techniques are used: positron emission tomography (PET), which reveals metabolic processes in the brain; and activity of different brain regions is measured on the basis of the cells’ oxygen consumption by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Study Supports Intracerebral Stem Cell Injections to Prevent/Reduce Post-Stroke Cognitive Deficits

August 26, 2013 10:05 am | by IOS Press | News | Comments

Cognitive deficits following ischemic stroke are common and debilitating, even in the relatively few patients who are treated expeditiously so that clots are removed or dissolved rapidly and cerebral blood flow restored. A new study in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience demonstrates that intracerebral injection of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells...

Study Seeks Super Agers' Secrets to Brain Health

August 23, 2013 10:49 am | by Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

They're called "super agers" — men and women who are in their 80s and 90s, but with brains and memories that seem far younger. Researchers are looking at this rare group in the hope that they may find ways to help protect others from memory loss. And they've had some tantalizing findings...

Players' Brain Study Finds Two Main Symptom Patterns

August 23, 2013 10:31 am | by Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Early signs of a destructive brain disease linked with head blows might include mood changes in younger athletes and mental decline at older ages, a small study of deceased former players suggests. The researchers think the disease could involve two distinct patterns of symptoms...

Receptor May Aid Spread of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in Brain

August 23, 2013 10:01 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a way that corrupted, disease-causing proteins spread in the brain, potentially contributing to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other brain-damaging disorders.

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