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Bringing the Incredible Bionic Man to Life

October 11, 2013 2:59 pm | by Smithsonian Channel | Videos | Comments

Rich Walker, managing director of Shadow Robot Co. and the lead roboticist on the project, and James Pope race against the clock as they assemble the Bionic Man. The device parts hail from 17 manufacturers around the world. The Bionic Man...

EyeBrain T2 Device Diagnoses Neurological and Psychiatric Conditions

October 11, 2013 11:12 am | by EyeBrain | News | Comments

EyeBrain, which develops markers of cerebral function for neurological and psychiatric conditions, today announces the launch of a new medical device, the EyeBrain T2. This new device will be used during examinations of ocular motricity...

Creating a Permanent Bacteria Barrier for Implantables

October 11, 2013 10:38 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Any medical device implanted in the body attracts bacteria, proteins, and other microbes to its surface, causing infections and thrombosis (blood clotting) that lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. Devices can be coated...  

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Qualcomm to Build Neuro-Inspired Chips

October 10, 2013 1:02 pm | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

The world’s largest smartphone chipmaker, Qualcomm, says it is ready to start helping partners manufacture a radically different kind of a chip—one that mimics the neural structures and processing methods found in the brain. The approach is emerging...

Neuros Medical Receives Regulatory Approval to Conduct Pivotal Study

October 10, 2013 9:00 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Neuros Medical, Inc., a medical device company announced it has received an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowing it to commence a pivotal clinical trial to evaluate...  

From Slowdown to Shutdown—US Leadership in Biomedical Research Takes a Blow

October 9, 2013 10:49 am | by American Society for Cell Biology | News | Comments

ASCB Executive Director Stefano Bertuzzi, PhD, told reporters that shutting down the driving engines of American bioscientific research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), will have effects well beyond...

Photos of the Day: Slice of Life

October 8, 2013 11:30 am | by David Stipp | News | Comments

Collagen implants have long been used to help heal shattered bones, burns and other injuries. But there’s a problem: The protein’s tough, water-insoluble fibrils make it hard to work with. Because of this, it is typically broken down into a gel...

Tissue Engineering Material Could Promote Nerve Growth

October 8, 2013 11:23 am | by David Stipp | News | Comments

When Qiaobing Xu was named an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Tufts in 2010, his first goal was to find a research niche to make his mark in. He soon came up with a literally cutting-edge concept: whittling wood. Wood, he explains...

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Swiss University Launches Human Brain Project

October 8, 2013 10:25 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A Swiss university has launched what it calls the world's most ambitious neuroscience project with a budget of 1.2 billion euros ($1.6 billion). The Human Brain Project, co-funded by the European Union, plans to use supercomputers to model the brain...

Stem Cells Help Repair Traumatic Brain Injury by Building a ‘Biobridge’

October 8, 2013 9:13 am | by Anne DeLotto Baier, University of South Florida | News | Comments

University of South Florida researchers have suggested a new view of how stem cells may help repair the brain following trauma. In a series of preclinical experiments, they report that transplanted cells appear to build a “biobridge”...  

E-Cigarettes Could Hook New Generation on Nicotine

October 7, 2013 4:45 pm | by Helen Branswell, The Canadian Press | News | Comments

A leading Canadian medical journal is raising concerns that electronic cigarettes could hook a new generation into nicotine addiction. An editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests that with fruit flavoured products...

Nanoscale Neuronal Activity Measured for the First Time

October 4, 2013 12:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

A new technique that allows scientists to measure the electrical activity in the communication junctions of the nervous systems has been developed by a researcher at Queen Mary University of London. The junctions in the central nervous systems that enable the information to flow between neurons, known as synapses, are around 100 times smaller than the width of a human hair...

Data-Driven Machine Learning Method Effectively Flags Risk for Post-Stroke Dangers

October 4, 2013 11:06 am | by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine | News | Comments

A team of experts in neurocritical care, engineering, and informatics, with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have devised a new way to detect which stroke patients may be at risk of a serious adverse event following a ruptured brain aneurysm.

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Putnam Plastics Reports Increased Interest in Catheter Innovation

October 4, 2013 10:17 am | by Putnam Plastics | News | Comments

Putnam Plastics Corporation, a leader in advanced extrusion for minimally invasive medical devices, reports increased interest in integrated catheter components made by medical device companies. These components leverage continuous manufacturing to combine sub-component processes, eliminate assembly steps and reduce manual labor, thus allowing device companies to reduce overall costs.

Researchers Find Potential Link Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer’s

October 4, 2013 10:13 am | by UF Health | News | Comments

Oral bacteria from poor dental hygiene have been linked to brain tissue degeneration, according to new evidence from an international team of researchers, including one at the University of Florida College of Dentistry. UF’s Lakshmyya Kesavalu, B.V.Sc., M.Sc., S.C.C., an associate professor in the College of Dentistry department of periodontology...

Photos of the Day: Patient Monitoring via Google Glass

October 3, 2013 2:18 pm | by Philips | News | Comments

Royal Philips and Accenture today announced the creation of a proof-of-concept demonstration that uses a Google Glass head-mounted display for researching ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of performing surgical procedures. The demonstration connects Google Glass to Philips IntelliVue Solutions...

First Proof of Concept for Delivering Vital Patient Data via Google Glass

October 3, 2013 2:08 pm | by Philips | News | Comments

Royal Philips and Accenture today announced the creation of a proof-of-concept demonstration that uses a Google Glass™ head-mounted display for researching ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of performing surgical procedures. The demonstration connects Google Glass to Philips IntelliVue Solutions...

Decoding Sound's Source: Researchers Unravel Part of the Mystery

October 2, 2013 5:11 pm | by Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary | News | Comments

As Baby Boomers age, many experience difficulty in hearing and understanding conversations in noisy environments such as restaurants. People who are hearing-impaired and who wear hearing aids or cochlear implants are even more severely impacted.

Researchers Find Early Success in New Treatment for Stroke Recovery

October 2, 2013 5:08 pm | by The University of Texas at Dallas | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have taken a step toward developing a new treatment to aid the recovery of limb function after strokes. In a study published online in the journal Neurobiology of Disease, researchers report the full recovery of forelimb strength in animals receiving vagus nerve stimulation.

FDA Grants Prestigious Award to Pediatric Medical Device Consortium Led by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

October 1, 2013 3:52 pm | by Business Wire | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Orphan Products Development has awarded a grant of up to $1.5 million over five years to the Southern California Center of Technology and Innovation in Pediatrics (CTIP), a consortium established by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Southern California (USC) for the development of pediatric medical devices.

Gentlemen, We Can Rebuild Him. We [Will] Have The Technology.

October 1, 2013 3:35 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

One day, I envision that there will be medical technology that can exceed the capabilities of the human body’s natural physiology. Should someone with such a device be prevented from playing professional sports due to the competitive advantage it provides?

Therapeutic Coatings for Medical Device Implants

October 1, 2013 3:27 pm | by Nathan Lockwood, Ph.D., Senior Manager of R&D, SurModics Inc. | SurModics, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Drug delivery coatings are not a new technology to the medical device industry. However, as more implantable devices are tasked with achieving a greater level of healthcare, they do offer great benefit to design engineers. This article reviews drug coating technology and looks at application areas where it has made a significant impact.

The Mount Sinai Hospital to Use Surgical Theater™ Technology for Brain Surgery Cases

October 1, 2013 2:58 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Surgical Theater, LLC, creator of the Surgical Rehearsal Platform (SRP), has announced the sale of its cutting-edge technology to The Mount Sinai Hospital, making it the first hospital in New York to utilize the SRP for complicated brain tumor and cerebral-vascular cases.

New Approach to Global Health Challenges

September 27, 2013 12:00 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

MIT’s new Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) is tackling some of the world’s biggest health challenges through an interdisciplinary approach that will seek new ways to diagnose and treat infectious, neurological and cardiovascular diseases.

Researchers Develop New Type of Fluorescent Camera for Blood Diagnostics, Brain Mapping

September 27, 2013 10:49 am | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

Fluorescence imaging is the most widely used method for analyzing the molecular composition of biological specimens. Target molecules, when they are present, can be "tagged" with a fluorescent label and made visible. This highly sensitive technique, which is used in screening blood for cancer cells and studying biochemical reactions, is very good at detecting molecules present in extremely low concentrations.

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