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Virginia Tech Carilion Researchers Find Surprising Relationships in Brain Signaling

September 12, 2013 11:48 am | by Paula Byron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

If the violins were taken away from the musicians performing Beethoven's 9th symphony, the resulting composition would sound very different. If the violins were left on stage but the violinists were removed, the same mutant version of the symphony would be heard. But what if it ended up sounding like "Hey Jude" instead?

The Pulse: Robots Remove Brain Tumors

September 12, 2013 10:12 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, brought to you by MDT TV, we’re removing brain tumors with robots, using MetaboShield to help obesity, regenerating heart tissue, and pairing glucometers with smartphones for ease of use.      

"Incidental Findings" Rare But Significant Events in Pediatric CT Scans

September 12, 2013 10:03 am | by UC Davis | News | Comments

The largest study of computed tomographic (CT) scans taken in emergency departments across the country for children with head injuries describes the prevalence of “incidental findings” and categorizes them by urgency. The study involved nearly 44,000 children seen for a head injury in 25 hospital emergency departments nationwide. Nearly 16,000 had CT scans to evaluate an injury, and about 4 percent of the scans revealed...

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Nanodiamonds to Deliver Chemotherapy Drugs Directly to Brain Tumors

September 12, 2013 9:54 am | by Shaun Mason, University of California - Los Angeles | News | Comments

The researchers found that ND–DOX levels in the tumors were retained for a duration far beyond that of doxorubicin alone, showing that doxorubicin was taken into the tumor and remained their longer when attached to nanodiamonds. In addition, ND–DOX was also found to increase...

Arch Biopartners Announces Issuance of U.S. Patent for Brain Tumor Cell Targeting Technology

September 12, 2013 9:09 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Arch Biopartners Inc announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued US Patent 8,530,429 protecting its peptide technology which targets brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs) and invasive glioma cells (IGCs). The patent protects novel synthetic peptides that target and attach to human BTICs and IGCs.

Post-Operative Cancer Treatment Technology Unveiled

September 11, 2013 10:10 am | by Team Consulting | Videos | Comments

Award-winning medical design and development company Team Consulting has today unveiled an innovative concept that has the potential to address two significant unmet clinical needs; early detection of cancer regrowth following surgery and detection of infection within chronic wounds.

UCI-Led Study Creates New Memories by Directly Changing the Brain

September 11, 2013 9:09 am | by University of California - Irvine | News | Comments

By studying how memories are made, UC Irvine neurobiologists created new, specific memories by direct manipulation of the brain, which could prove key to understanding and potentially resolving learning and memory disorders. Research led by senior author Norman M. Weinberger and colleagues has shown that specific memories can be made by directly altering brain cells in the cerebral cortex...

Brain Injury Study Tracks Football's Youngest Players

September 10, 2013 3:36 pm | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

The end-of-August announcement that the National Football League will pay $765 million to settle a lawsuit involving thousands of its former players over problems related to head trauma is just one sign of the growing concern that the sport’s collisions pose a serious risk to long-term player health.

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Artificial-Intelligence Research Revives Its Old Ambitions

September 10, 2013 9:46 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The birth of artificial-intelligence research as an autonomous discipline is generally thought to have been the monthlong Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence in 1956, which convened 10 leading electrical engineers — including MIT’s Marvin Minsky and Claude Shannon — to discuss “how to make machines use language” and “form abstractions and concepts.”

European Launch of New Version of Codman Neuro’s Revive SE Thrombectomy Device for Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke

September 9, 2013 2:06 pm | by Codman Neuro | News | Comments

Codman Neuro, part of DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced the European launch of the REVIVE™ SE Thrombectomy Device, a next generation clot removal device offering enhanced navigation through the cerebral vasculature and rapid restoration of blood flow to the brain after an ischemic stroke.

Bill Gates, 5 Scientists Win Lasker Medical Prizes

September 9, 2013 12:23 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Two scientists who illuminated how brain cells communicate, three researchers who developed implants that let deaf people hear and philanthropists Bill and Melinda Gates have won prestigious Lasker Awards for medical research and contributions to public health.

Capturing Brain Activity with Sculpted Light

September 9, 2013 12:16 pm | by Universität Wien | News | Comments

Researchers in Vienna develop new imaging technique to study the function of entire nervous systems Scientists at the Campus Vienna Biocenter have found a way to overcome some of the limitations of light microscopy. Applying the new technique, they can record the activity of a worm’s brain with high temporal and spatial resolution, ultimately linking brain anatomy to brain function.

Keystone Heart's TriGuardT Cerebral Protection Device Receives CE Marking

September 9, 2013 4:15 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Keystone Heart, a leader in the development of cerebral protection devices for interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery procedures, announced today that its TriGuardT Cerebral Protection Device has received CE Marking, enabling the company to commercially market the TriGuard in Europe and other territories.

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Medtronic traces surgical kit possibly contaminated with fatal brain disease

September 6, 2013 12:02 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Medtronic is working with New England hospitals and government health officials to track the movement of surgical medical equipment involved in several cases of possible patient exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare and fatal relative to the more commonly known "mad cow" disease.

Robot-assisted surgery: Mazor touts landmark Parkinson's patient treated

September 4, 2013 7:29 am | by Mass Device | News | Comments

For the 1st time Mazor Robotics' Renaissance robot-assisted surgical system system was used to to treat a Parkinson's patient, implanting a battery-sized neurostimulator that delivers mild electrical stimulation to targeted areas of the brain. The landmark procedure took place at a Florida hospital earlier this month.

Toward an Early Diagnostic Tool for Alzheimer’s Disease

September 3, 2013 10:23 am | by Stéphanie Thibault, INRS | News | Comments

Despite all the research done on Alzheimer’s, there is still no early diagnostic tool for the disease. By looking at the brain wave components of individuals with the disease, Professor Tiago H. Falk of INRS’s Centre Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications has identified a promising avenue of research that may not only help diagnose the disease, but also assess its severity.

Creating a 'Window' to the Brain

September 3, 2013 9:55 am | by University of California - Riverside | News | Comments

A team of University of California, Riverside researchers have developed a novel transparent skull implant that literally provides a "window to the brain", which they hope will eventually open new treatment options for patients with life-threatening neurological disorders, such as brain cancer and traumatic brain injury.

Significantly Improving the Treatment of Brain Cancer with a Robot

August 29, 2013 2:39 pm | by Worcester Polytechnic Institute | News | Comments

With a five-year, $3 million R01 award from the National Institutes of Health, through the National Cancer Institute, a team of researchers led by Gregory Fischer, Ph.D. will test a new, minimally invasive approach to treating brain tumors that promises to accurately destroy malignant tissue while leaving surrounding tissue unaffected.

Brain Inflammation Linked to More Severe Parkinson’s Symptoms

August 29, 2013 11:03 am | by Michigan State University | News | Comments

Reversing inflammation in the fluid surrounding the brain’s cortex may provide a solution to the complex riddle of Parkinson’s, according to researchers who have found a link between pro-inflammatory biomarkers and the severity of symptoms such as fatigue, depression and anxiety in patients with the chronic disease.

Scientists Find Clue to Age-Related Memory Loss

August 29, 2013 10:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have found a compelling clue in the quest to learn what causes age-related memory problems, and to one day be able to tell if those misplaced car keys are just a senior moment or an early warning of something worse. Wednesday's report offers evidence that age-related memory loss really is a distinct condition from pre-Alzheimer's...

Growing Brains on Demand

August 29, 2013 9:54 am | by Institute of Molecular Biotechnology | News | Comments

Complex human brain tissue has been successfully developed in a three-dimensional culture system established in an Austrian laboratory. The method described in the current issue of NATURE allows pluripotent stem cells to develop into cerebral organoids – or "mini brains" – that consist of several discrete brain regions.

First Patient Implant of Stroke Treatment Device

August 28, 2013 10:53 am | by MicroTransponder | News | Comments

The Vivistim System has been developed to treat stroke patients that experience an upper-limb deficit following their stroke. These are patients that are unable to fully recover the use of their upper-limbs at least 6 months following their stroke. A United Kingdom based clinical trial is underway using the Vivistim System in the Glasgow and Newcastle areas.

Researcher Controls Colleague’s Motions in 1st Human Brain-to-Brain Interface

August 28, 2013 10:25 am | by Doree Armstrong and Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

University of Washington researchers have performed what they believe is the first noninvasive human-to-human brain interface, with one researcher able to send a brain signal via the Internet to control the hand motions of a fellow researcher.  

Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans: A Pilot Study

August 28, 2013 10:23 am | by University of Washington | Videos | Comments

A video of example trials from a pilot study of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans conducted by Rajesh Rao, Andrea Stocco, and colleagues at the U of Washington, Seattle. Using electrical brain recordings and a form of magnetic stimulation, Rajesh Rao sent a brain signal to Andrea Stocco on the other side of the UW campus, causing Stocco’s finger to move on a keyboard.

Combating Concussions

August 28, 2013 10:01 am | by San Diego State University | News | Comments

In the United States there are millions of sports related concussions each year, but many go undiagnosed because for some athletes, the fear of being benched trumps the fear of permanent brain damage, and there is no objective test available to accurately diagnose concussions on the sidelines. Researchers at San Diego State University have set out to change that.

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