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Good Vibrations: Mediating Mood Through Brain Ultrasound

July 18, 2013 3:28 pm | by University of Arizona | News | Comments

University of Arizona researchers have found in a recent study that ultrasound waves applied to specific areas of the brain appear able to alter patients' moods. The discovery has led the scientists to conduct further investigations with the hope that this technique could one day be used to treat conditions such as depression and anxiety.

New Way to Measure Cumulative Effect of Head Hits in Football

July 18, 2013 3:23 pm | by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | News | Comments

The metric, called Risk Weighted Cumulative Exposure (RWE), can capture players' exposure to the risk of concussion over the course of a football season by measuring the frequency and magnitude of all impacts, said senior author of the study Joel Stitzel, Ph.D., chair of biomedical engineering at Wake Forest Baptist.

Early Detection and Treatment of Alzheimer's Prevents Psychological and Behavioral Symptoms

July 18, 2013 10:58 am | by University of Eastern Finland | News | Comments

Persons with Alzheimer's disease are able to manage their everyday activities longer and they suffer from less psychological and behavioural symptoms if the diagnosis is made and treatment begun at a very early phase of the disease, indicates a recent study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland.

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Memory Decline May be Earliest Sign of Dementia

July 17, 2013 4:10 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Memory problems that are often dismissed as a normal part of aging may not be so harmless after all. Noticing you have had a decline beyond the occasional misplaced car keys or forgotten name could be the very earliest sign of Alzheimer's, several research teams are reporting.

Bird-Brain Wiring Model Could be Used to Control Robots

July 17, 2013 12:56 pm | by Colin Smith, Imperial College London | News | Comments

A researcher from Imperial College London and his colleagues have developed for the first time a map of a typical bird brain, showing how different regions are connected together to process information.        

Ensuring the Right Fit: Medical Device Testing and the Human Factor

July 16, 2013 2:12 pm | by Chris Evans, Director of Innovation—Pharmaceutical Delivery Systems, West Pharmaceutical Services | Articles | Comments

Device testing is required for a wide array of variables in the development of a medical device. When it comes to devices used directly by the patient, however, it is critical to test the patient/device “relationship.” This article looks at examining and testing the human factor when it comes to the handling of a medical device and how the design can be improved to enhance that relationship.

Edwards Lifesciences goes after another set of Medtronic patents

July 16, 2013 1:35 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

Edwards Lifesciences wants a federal judge to rule that a pair of patents owned by arch-rival Medtronic are invalid because they aren't specific enough. The patents cover nerve stimulation technology. Edwards and Medtronic have spent considerable time in courts around the world, each arguing that the other's transcatheter aortic valve implant infringes various patents.

NeuroMetrix Announces Sleep Indication for SENSUS Pain Management System

July 16, 2013 11:04 am | by Business Wire | News | Comments

NeuroMetrix, Inc., a medical device company focused on the treatment of the neurological complications of diabetes, reported that the SENSUS Pain Management System became the first transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator to receive 510(k) clearance (K130919) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use during sleep.

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Brain Wave Test Device for ADHD

July 16, 2013 9:51 am | by U.S. Food and Drug Administration | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first medical device based on brain function to help assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years old. When used as part of a complete medical and psychological examination, the device can help confirm an ADHD diagnosis.

How Smart Dust Could Spy On Your Brain

July 16, 2013 12:08 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

The real time monitoring of brain function has advanced in leaps and bounds in recent years. That’s largely thanks to various new technologies that can monitor the collective behaviour of groups of neurons, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalopathy and positron emission tomography.

Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center's Youngest Patient Praises New "Sci-Fi" Procedure

July 12, 2013 4:39 pm | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

First experiencing symptoms at just 29-years-old and diagnosed with Parkinson's at age 34, Tommy Zuleger is the youngest patient ever treated at the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix and he says a new "sci-fi" procedure has given him his life back.

FDA green-lights NeuroMetrix pain treatment device for bed-time use

July 12, 2013 1:36 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

NeuroMetrix's (NSDQ:NURO) Sensus wearable pain management device can now be paired with pajamas thanks to the FDA's clearance of the device for use during sleep. The FDA typically requires warning labels for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators like Sensus because of their tendency to dislodge during sleep, which may pose an electrical hazard.

Daydreaming Simulated by Computer Model

July 12, 2013 10:00 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Scientists have created a virtual model of the brain that daydreams like humans do. Researchers created the computer model based on the dynamics of brain cells and the many connections those cells make with their neighbors and with cells in other brain regions.

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Medicare aims to level reimbursement playing field in fight between Elekta and Varian

July 11, 2013 12:45 pm | by Mass Device | News | Comments

A new proposal from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services would help level at least 1 battlefield between radiosurgery devices makers Elekta and Varian Medical Systems. The reimbursement proposal would offer equal payment to healthcare providers conducting single-treatment radiosurgery for brain tumors, whether the procedure is conducted with Elekta's Gamma Knife or Varian's Linac.

The Pulse: Achieving Sight Through Sound

July 11, 2013 11:09 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a device that helps train the brain to turn sounds into images, detecting cancer by imaging the consumption of sugar, biomedical applications for a new hydrogel, and a nanofiber mesh that treats tumors with both thermotherapy and chemotherapy.

Care Interrupted—Top Five Vulnerabilities in Medical Devices

July 10, 2013 3:17 pm | by Matt Neely, Director of Strategic Initiatives, SecureState | Blogs | Comments

Putting medical devices on the network provides a large number of benefits, such as supporting telemedicine and the easy transfer of test results to electronic medical records (EMR) systems. However, putting these devices on a network also introduces a number of risks.

A Fundamental Problem for Brain Mapping

July 10, 2013 12:00 pm | by Case Western Reserve University | News | Comments

Is there a brain area for mind-wandering? For religious experience? For reorienting attention? A recent study casts serious doubt on the evidence for these ideas, and rewrites the rules for neuroimaging. Brain mapping experiments attempt to identify the cognitive functions associated with discrete cortical regions.

X2 Biosystems aims for $12.5M funding round

July 10, 2013 8:44 am | by Mass Device | News | Comments

X2 Biosystems, a medical device company that's developing sensors for sports brain injuries, drummed up $3.3 million of a hoped-for $12.5 million raise, according to a regulatory filing. Eighteen unnamed investors kicked in on the round, according to the filing.

CPAP Therapy Reduces Nightmares in Veterans with PTSD and Sleep Apnea

July 8, 2013 4:03 pm | by American Academy of Sleep Medicine | News | Comments

A new study suggests that CPAP therapy reduces nightmares in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and obstructive sleep apnea. Results show that the mean number of nightmares per week fell significantly with CPAP use, and reduced nightmare frequency after starting CPAP was best predicted by CPAP compliance.

University Experts Spot Early Signs of Alzheimer’s

July 8, 2013 12:02 pm | by Birmingham City University | News | Comments

Early signs of Alzheimer’s disease can be detected years before diagnosis, according to researchers at Birmingham City University. The study found that sufferers of a specific type of cognitive impairment have an increased loss of cells in certain parts of the brain, which can be vital in detecting which patients will progress to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s.

Radiofrequency Procedure Stuns Nerves, Relieves Chronic Neck Pain Longer

July 3, 2013 11:53 am | by UF Health News | News | Comments

A nonsurgical procedure offered at the University of Florida Health Spine & Sports Intervention Center uses Cervicool, a water-cooled radiofrequency system by Kimberly-Clark Corp., to treat the facet joints in the neck to relieve pain. 

Low Levels of Toxic Proteins Linked to Brain Diseases

July 3, 2013 10:26 am | by University of Edinburgh | News | Comments

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's could be better understood thanks to insight into proteins linked to such conditions, a study suggests. Scientists studying thread-like chains of protein have found that low levels of these proteins may cause more harm to health than high levels.

Dissecting the Distinctive Walk of Disease

July 3, 2013 10:11 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Older adults diagnosed with brain disorders such as Parkinson’s disease often feel a loss of independence because of their lack of mobility and difficulty walking. To better understand and improve these mobility issues, a research team is working toward building a more advanced motion test.

Home Healthcare Presents Design Challenges

July 2, 2013 11:54 am | by Ryan Striker, P.E., Electrical Engineer, Logic PD | Logic PD, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

To unlock the potential of more frequent therapy, medical devices must move out of the doctor’s office and travel with patients to their homes and offices. But, this great opportunity is not without its challenges. The same patient who stands to reap great benefit from a home medical device may instead endanger themselves by applying the device incorrectly.

Irreversible Tissue Loss After Spinal Cord Injury

July 2, 2013 10:25 am | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

A spinal cord injury changes the functional state and structure of the spinal cord and the brain. For example, the patients' ability to walk or move their hands can become restricted. How quickly such degenerative changes develop, however, has remained a mystery until now.

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