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‘Lighting Up’ Tumors with Scorpion Venom and a Laser

February 25, 2014 12:04 pm | by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center | News | Comments

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery have developed a unique, compact, relatively inexpensive imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors and other cancers. The experimental...

Photos of the Day: Brain Stimulating Glove

February 25, 2014 10:25 am | by RUBIN | News | Comments

Neuroscientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a glove that uses weak electrical pulses to stimulate the nerve fibers that connect the hands with the brain. If applied regularly, that kind of passive stimulation results in an...

Stimulation Glove for Stroke Patients

February 25, 2014 10:21 am | by Ruhr-Universität Bochum | News | Comments

Improving the sense of touch and motor skills without active training – what sounds impossible, does actually work. Neuroscientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a glove that uses weak electrical pulses to stimulate the nerve...

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‘Home’ Is Where the Heart Is (Part 2)

February 24, 2014 2:19 pm | by Tony Zarola, Strategic Marketing Manager, Healthcare | Articles | Comments

Many reports, papers, and studies have been written about the benefits of remote health monitoring, but when you look at the number of companies and institutions that are investing time and energy incorporating VSM (vital sign monitoring)...

Researchers Find That Going with the Flow Makes Bacteria Stick

February 24, 2014 11:17 am | by David Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

In a surprising new finding, researchers have discovered that bacterial movement is impeded in flowing water, enhancing the likelihood that the microbes will attach to surfaces. The new work could have implications for the study of marine...

Interactive Motion Technologies InMotion Robots Used to Identify Novel Biomarkers of Motor Recovery

February 24, 2014 9:00 am | by PR Newswire | News | Comments

Interactive Motion Technologies, global leader in Redefining Recovery using robotic tools for neurorehabilitation, has announced publication of results from a ground-breaking study identifying biomarkers of motor recovery in Stroke, Journal...

Survey Reveals Real World Impact of Medical Device Tax

February 21, 2014 12:22 pm | by AdvaMed | News | Comments

The Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) has released new survey results examining the first-year impact of the medical device excise tax. The survey found a significant reduction in jobs, R&D, and U.S. investment. To...

New Apps May Help Detect Seizures, Treat Strokes

February 21, 2014 10:57 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

Two new smart phone applications may help people detect epileptic seizures and get better stroke treatment, according to two studies released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in...  

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Researchers Regenerate Sound-Sensing Cells in the Ears of Mice with Hearing Damage

February 20, 2014 2:52 pm | by Cell Press | News | Comments

One of the major causes of hearing loss in mammals is damage to the sound-sensing hair cells in the inner ear. For years, scientists have thought that these cells are not replaced once they're lost, but new research appearing online February...

The Connected Person and Healthcare

February 19, 2014 1:30 pm | by Alpesh Shah, Director of Global Business Strategy and Intelligence, IEEE Standards Association | Blogs | Comments

The advent of technology has pushed the concepts of healthcare to a different level. Areas of healthcare (diagnostic, well-being, assisted living) are benefitting from these technological advances today and for the unforeseeable future...

Can You Boost Your Brain Power Through Video?

February 19, 2014 11:42 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

Watching video of simple tasks before carrying them out may boost the brain's structure, or plasticity, and increase motor skills, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual...

Editorial Guidance

February 18, 2014 1:49 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

I’m pleased to introduce the members of MDT’s first editorial advisory board. Representing the industry from supplier to medical device OEM to consultant, I’ve reached out to these individuals to help me tailor the scope of MDT’s editorial...

Finding Ways to Detect and Treat Alzheimer's Disease

February 18, 2014 12:25 pm | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Alzheimer's disease has long been marked by progress -- but not the kind of progress the medical community seeks. It is the most common form of dementia among older Americans, and its risk increases with increasing age; for those living with...

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Thinking It Through: Scientists Seek to Unlock Mysteries of the Brain

February 18, 2014 12:13 pm | by Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne | News | Comments

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest challenges facing 21st century science. If we can rise to this challenge, we will gain profound insights into what makes us human, develop new treatments for brain diseases, and build...

How Well do Football Helmets Protect Players from Concussions?

February 18, 2014 11:55 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

A new study finds that football helmets currently used on the field may do little to protect against hits to the side of the head, or rotational force, an often dangerous source of brain injury and encephalopathy. The study released today...

Test Could Predict Which Teen Boys Get Depression

February 18, 2014 11:52 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help identify those who will later develop major depression, a new study says. Researchers measured the stress hormone cortisol in teenage boys and found that ones with...

Brain Tumor Removal Through a Hole Smaller than a Dime

February 18, 2014 11:17 am | by Houston Methodist Neurological Institute | News | Comments

More than two decades ago, Ryan Vincent had open brain surgery to remove a malignant brain tumor, resulting in a lengthy hospital stay and weeks of recovery at home. Recently, neurosurgeons at Houston Methodist Hospital, through a...   

Scientists Study New Ways to Restore Hand Movement After Paralysis

February 14, 2014 1:51 pm | by Elaine Schmidt, UCLA | News | Comments

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has awarded UCLA researchers Dr. Daniel Lu (Brentwood) and Dr. Reggie Edgerton (Bel Air) a $6 million, five-year grant to explore new therapies for the approximately 273,000...

Rebuilding the Brain After Stroke

February 14, 2014 12:23 pm | by Henry Ford Health System | News | Comments

Enhancing the brain's inherent ability to rebuild itself after a stroke with molecular components of stem cells holds enormous promise for treating the leading cause of long-term disability in adults. Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Scientific Director...

Laser Technology Lets Parkinsonism Patients Walk Again

February 13, 2014 3:07 pm | by Reuters | Videos | Comments

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have developed a device that re-routes brain signals in Parkinsonism disorder patients, allowing them to regain mobility. For at least one patient in Florida, the device is ...            

Brain Process Takes Paper Shape

February 13, 2014 2:31 pm | by Michael Bishop, Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A paper-based device that mimics the electrochemical signaling in the human brain has been created by a group of researchers from China. The thin-film transistor (TFT) has been designed to ...             

Synthetic Voices, as Unique as Fingerprints

February 13, 2014 11:29 am | by TED | Videos | Comments

Many of those with severe speech disorders use a computerized device to communicate. Yet they choose between only a few voice options. That's why Stephen Hawking has an American accent, and why many people end up with the same voice, often to ...

Mind-Controlled Quadcopter Brings New Possibilities for the Disabled

February 13, 2014 10:56 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), biomedical engineer Bin He and his team at the University of Minnesota have created a brain-computer interface with the goal of helping people with disabilities, such as paralysis, regain ...

Brilliant Blue G May Shine in Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries

February 12, 2014 11:12 am | by Toni Baker, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University | News | Comments

A close cousin of the dye that makes fabric, M&M's and sports drinks blue may improve recovery from traumatic brain injuries. Falls, motor vehicle accidents, collisions, assaults, and war injuries result in ...     

Optogenetic Toolkit Goes Multicolor

February 11, 2014 4:31 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Optogenetics is a technique that allows scientists to control neurons’ electrical activity with light by engineering them to express light-sensitive proteins. Within the past decade, it has ...          

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