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Multimodal Fibers Deliver Drugs and Optical Signals Directly to the Brain

January 20, 2015 11:58 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study — not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously. Conventional neural probes are designed to record a single...

The Benefits of the ASM Medical Materials Database

January 20, 2015 10:39 am | by Linda Vermillion, Product Manager, ASM International | Articles | Comments

ASM International, the world's largest professional society for materials engineering, and Granta Design, leaders in materials information technology, today announced a new Surgical module in the ASM Medical Materials Database. This new resource...

Wearable Sensor Provides Long-Term EKG and EMG Monitoring

January 20, 2015 10:05 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate...

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Photos of the Day: The 15 Biggest Innovations in Health Tech

January 20, 2015 9:40 am | by 10zig Technology | News | Comments

VMware Horizon TM 6 (with view) allows healthcare organizations the ability to deliver virtualized and remote Windows desktops and applications through a single platform in their workforce. Release Date June 2014 (Formally VMware View and...

Words in the Mouth: Hearing with Your Tongue

January 20, 2015 9:28 am | by Kortny Rolston, Colorado State University | News | Comments

In the future, those with substantial hearing loss may no longer need a doctor to surgically implant a cochlear device into their ear to restore their sense of sound. If researchers at Colorado State University are successful, they may just...

High Speed Microscope Performs Real-Time 3D Imaging

January 20, 2015 9:02 am | by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new microscope...

Zapping Away the Pounds, but What Zaps Away the Habit?

January 16, 2015 3:06 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

There is no doubt that losing excess weight can help to eliminate an array of health concerns or reduce the risk of their occurrence. Unfortunately, the process of actually shaving off those pounds can pose a significant challenge. So it will come as great...

Enlarging Brain Tissue Samples Allows Higher-Resolution Images

January 15, 2015 2:38 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of so-called “super-resolution” microscopes can...

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Short Nanowires Most Effective for Inserting Electrodes into the Brain

January 15, 2015 10:02 am | by Lund University | News | Comments

If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less irritating for the brain tissue. However...

Brain Imaging Test for Autism Spectrum Disorder

January 15, 2015 9:50 am | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have developed a brain-imaging technique that may be able to identify children with autism spectrum disorder in just two minutes. This test, while far from being used as the clinical standard...

The Pulse: 3-D Printing a Smartphone Microscope and an Invisible Hearing Aid

January 15, 2015 9:02 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we're measuring biometric information with an adhesive patch, 3-D printing a microscope for your smartphone, relieving pain without drugs, and using an invisible hearing aid...             

Advanced 3-D Facial Imaging Can Help Detect Autism

January 14, 2015 11:55 am | by University of Missouri - Columbia | News | Comments

Autism is a spectrum of closely related disorders diagnosed in patients who exhibit a shared core of symptoms, including delays in learning to communicate and interact socially. Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be...

Measuring Concussion Forces in the Greatest Detail Yet

January 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford News Service | News | Comments

More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from concussions each year, but scientists are just beginning to understand the traumatic forces that cause the injury. Now a team of engineers and physicians at Stanford has provided the...

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Nanolaser Biosensor Could Detect Biomarkers of Cancer or Alzheimer's

January 13, 2015 11:53 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A simple method to sense DNA, as well as potential biomarker proteins of cancer or other diseases such as Alzheimer’s, may soon be within reach – thanks to the work of a team of Yokohama National University researchers in Japan. As the team...

App Conducts Research on Breast Cancer and Alzheimer's While Your Phone Charges

January 13, 2015 10:45 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Your smartphone is already great for sending email, checking sports scores and sharing photos of your lunch. Now it can help battle cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases, thanks to a new app developed by Stanford scientists and Sony. The...

Cognitive Training Game Provides Potential Alzheimer's Diagnostics

January 12, 2015 2:12 pm | by IOS Press BV | News | Comments

Greek researchers demonstrated the potential of a virtual supermarket cognitive training game as a screening tool for patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among a sample of older adults. MCI is a condition that often predates Alzheimer's...

Photos of the Day: Seeing Bones and Organs in Striking Detail

January 12, 2015 11:15 am | by GE Reports | News | Comments

Computed Tomography (CT) scanners are often the first imaging technology many patients encounter when doctors suspect serious disease or injury. The machines use a narrow beam of X-rays processed by a computer to create slices of the...

Implanted Stimulator Offers Potential Spinal Paralysis Rehabilitation

January 12, 2015 10:37 am | by Medical University of Vienna | News | Comments

Even after complete spinal paralysis, the human spinal cord is able to trigger activity in the leg muscles using electrical pulses from an implanted stimulator. This has already been demonstrated in earlier studies conducted in Vienna. Now, as part...

Spinal Cord Implant Mimics Living Tissue

January 9, 2015 10:36 am | by École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne | News | Comments

EPFL scientists have managed to get rats walking on their own again using a combination of electrical and chemical stimulation. But applying this method to humans would require multifunctional implants that could be installed for long periods of...

Time May Heal a Broken Heart, but Stem Cells Do It Better

January 7, 2015 4:21 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

NuVascular Technologies has obtained exclusive licensing rights for the purpose of commercializing an implantable device that uses stem cells to repair damage to the heart. The innovation, called the Biogenerator, is implanted into the wall of the heart...

A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Ears

January 7, 2015 3:15 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

Trying to have a conversation in a noisy, crowded room amid a cacophony of voices is difficult enough for someone with healthy hearing. This situation becomes torturous for someone who wears a hearing aid. Every sound is amplified, and instead...

Melatonin Patch Could Save Countless Infants in Developing Countries

January 7, 2015 11:02 am | by University of Monash | News | Comments

With a clinical trial on the cards and training programs under way, a measure that’s as simple to apply as a bandaid is showing great potential to save millions of babies’ lives in low-resource countries. A multidisciplinary

Mapping Origins of Mental Illness for Improved Treatments

January 7, 2015 10:48 am | by Amy Adams, Director of Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Communications, Stanford University | News | Comments

An interdisciplinary team of Stanford scientists is working to map the origins of mental illnesses in the brain and develop technologies to treat them. The collaboration could lead to improved treatments for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic...

An App for Diagnosing Head Injuries

January 6, 2015 2:03 pm | by Ramin A. Khalili, USAMRMC Combat Casualty Care Research Program Knowledge Manager | News | Comments

The new Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment is a mobile phone-based application designed to help medical providers identify cases of traumatic brain injury in almost any setting, which may help clinicians diagnose a patient...

Night Light for Your Brain Produces Natural Sleep

January 6, 2015 12:10 pm | by Helen Knight, MIT News correspondent | News | Comments

Getting enough of the right kind of sleep is crucial for keeping both body and mind healthy. Now a team of researchers at MIT has moved a step closer to being able to produce natural sleep patterns. In a paper published today...

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