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Low-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Parkinson’s Symptoms

January 28, 2015 9:17 am | by University of Chicago Medical Center | News | Comments

Parkinson’s disease patients treated with low-frequency deep brain stimulation show significant improvements in swallowing dysfunction and freezing of gait over typical high-frequency treatment. The study, published in Neurology on Jan 27...

Brain-to-Brain Communication has Arrived: How We Did It

January 27, 2015 9:00 am | by TEDGlobal | Videos | Comments

You may remember neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis — he built the brain-controlled...

Getting Inside: Implantables and Technologies that Deliver Them

January 27, 2015 8:30 am | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

There are several significant drivers of innovation in the medical device space....

This Neurostimulator Makes People Cry

January 26, 2015 11:11 am | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | News | Comments

A Stanford University fellow developed implantable neurostimulators to create tears...

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Cochlear Implant Users Can Still Feel the Beat in Music

January 26, 2015 10:29 am | by Georgetown University Medical Center | News | Comments

People who use cochlear implants for profound hearing loss do respond to certain aspects of music, contrary to common beliefs and limited scientific research, says a research team headed by an investigator at Georgetown University Medical...

Using Your Thoughts to Control Wireless Devices

January 26, 2015 10:15 am | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | News | Comments

British company Flexctrl Ltd. is crowdfunding a headset designed to enable users to control wireless devices with brain activity. The indiegogo campaign, which began on Dec. 23, has raised £741 ($1,112) out of its £125,000 ($187,000) goal as of...

Diaper Compound Could Enhance Brain Cell Imaging

January 23, 2015 3:13 pm | by NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke | News | Comments

Pour, mix, set, add water and voila: highly detailed images of the inside of cells. A study, partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, showed that a modified form of the superabsorbent chemical used in disposable diapers can expand...

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Creating a Smarter Connection between Man and Machine

January 23, 2015 1:12 pm | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | SurModics, Inc. | News | Comments

As smart technology becomes more and more common in the medical field, new materials are developed to facilitate connection between the body and the devices that help it thrive. A new conductive coating could enable electrode miniaturization...

Live Broadcast from Inside the Nerve Cell

January 23, 2015 10:49 am | by Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry | News | Comments

Scientists estimate that our brain consists of about ten to one hundred billions of nerve cells. In order to fulfill their respective tasks as long as possible, these cells have to constantly control their internal proteins with regard to quality and...

Sensory Substitution Devices Create 'Mental Images' for Blind Patients

January 23, 2015 9:18 am | by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem | News | Comments

Studying the brain activity of blind people, scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem are challenging the standard view of how the human brain specializes to perform different kinds of tasks, and shedding new light on how our brains can...

Robotic Hand Learns Fine Movements from Monkeys

January 22, 2015 9:51 am | by German Primate Center | News | Comments

Tying shoelaces, stirring coffee, writing letters, playing the piano.  From the usual daily routine to demanding activities: Our hands are used more frequently than any other body part. Through our highly developed fine motor skills, we are able to...

'Serious Games' Use Virtual Reality for a Wide Array of Treatments

January 22, 2015 9:32 am | by The University of Huddersfield | News | Comments

Researchers and practitioners in the burgeoning area of ‘serious games’ are using video game-based technologies such as virtual reality – more widely associated with entertainment – in order to make breakthroughs in many aspects of healthcare...

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Treating Chronic Conditions with Neuromodulation

January 22, 2015 9:00 am | by International Neuromodulation Society | News | Comments

The International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress will feature traditional and cutting-edge ways to address chronic disease through interfacing with the body’s nervous system. The congress is expected to draw 1,500 scientists...

Using Light to Beat the Winter Blues

January 21, 2015 10:13 am | by Philips Healthcare | News | Comments

Join Royal Philips, the global leader in lighting to beat the most depressing day of the year. According to a study by Cliff Arnall, the most depressing date of the year is today and is amongst others due to the weather conditions and lack of sun...

Portable Stimulator Being Tested on Parkinson's Patients

January 21, 2015 8:43 am | by University of Gothenburg | News | Comments

Parkinson's disease is a slowly degenerative neurological disease that is expressed as impaired motor control, tremors, stiffness and, in later stages, problems with balance. The symptoms are caused by a lack of the signal substance dopamine and...

Multimodal Fibers Deliver Drugs and Optical Signals Directly to the Brain

January 20, 2015 11:58 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study — not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously. Conventional neural probes are designed to record a single...

The Benefits of the ASM Medical Materials Database

January 20, 2015 10:39 am | by Linda Vermillion, Product Manager, ASM International | Articles | Comments

ASM International, the world's largest professional society for materials engineering, and Granta Design, leaders in materials information technology, today announced a new Surgical module in the ASM Medical Materials Database. This new resource...

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Wearable Sensor Provides Long-Term EKG and EMG Monitoring

January 20, 2015 10:05 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate...

Photos of the Day: The 15 Biggest Innovations in Health Tech

January 20, 2015 9:40 am | by 10zig Technology | News | Comments

VMware Horizon TM 6 (with view) allows healthcare organizations the ability to deliver virtualized and remote Windows desktops and applications through a single platform in their workforce. Release Date June 2014 (Formally VMware View and...

Words in the Mouth: Hearing with Your Tongue

January 20, 2015 9:28 am | by Kortny Rolston, Colorado State University | News | Comments

In the future, those with substantial hearing loss may no longer need a doctor to surgically implant a cochlear device into their ear to restore their sense of sound. If researchers at Colorado State University are successful, they may just...

High Speed Microscope Performs Real-Time 3D Imaging

January 20, 2015 9:02 am | by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new microscope...

Zapping Away the Pounds, but What Zaps Away the Habit?

January 16, 2015 3:06 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

There is no doubt that losing excess weight can help to eliminate an array of health concerns or reduce the risk of their occurrence. Unfortunately, the process of actually shaving off those pounds can pose a significant challenge. So it will come as great...

Enlarging Brain Tissue Samples Allows Higher-Resolution Images

January 15, 2015 2:38 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of so-called “super-resolution” microscopes can...

Short Nanowires Most Effective for Inserting Electrodes into the Brain

January 15, 2015 10:02 am | by Lund University | News | Comments

If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less irritating for the brain tissue. However...

Brain Imaging Test for Autism Spectrum Disorder

January 15, 2015 9:50 am | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have developed a brain-imaging technique that may be able to identify children with autism spectrum disorder in just two minutes. This test, while far from being used as the clinical standard...

The Pulse: 3-D Printing a Smartphone Microscope and an Invisible Hearing Aid

January 15, 2015 9:02 am | by John Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

On this episode of the Pulse, we're measuring biometric information with an adhesive patch, 3-D printing a microscope for your smartphone, relieving pain without drugs, and using an invisible hearing aid...             

Advanced 3-D Facial Imaging Can Help Detect Autism

January 14, 2015 11:55 am | by University of Missouri - Columbia | News | Comments

Autism is a spectrum of closely related disorders diagnosed in patients who exhibit a shared core of symptoms, including delays in learning to communicate and interact socially. Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be...

Measuring Concussion Forces in the Greatest Detail Yet

January 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford News Service | News | Comments

More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from concussions each year, but scientists are just beginning to understand the traumatic forces that cause the injury. Now a team of engineers and physicians at Stanford has provided the...

Nanolaser Biosensor Could Detect Biomarkers of Cancer or Alzheimer's

January 13, 2015 11:53 am | by American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

A simple method to sense DNA, as well as potential biomarker proteins of cancer or other diseases such as Alzheimer’s, may soon be within reach – thanks to the work of a team of Yokohama National University researchers in Japan. As the team...

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