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The Lead

Device Control at Your Fingertips

April 20, 2015 3:01 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

There’s an interesting underlying paradox in device development – the more functions a gadget is able to perform, the more simplistic its interface must become. After all, what use is a tricorder going to be if it isn’t user friendly? It would...

Compendium Tackles Challenge of Medical Device Integration

April 20, 2015 12:51 pm | by AAMI | News | Comments

Do you have questions about connecting medical devices and electronic health records (EHRs)? A...

Is EEG All That Is Necessary for Alzheimer's Diagnosis?

April 20, 2015 10:34 am | by Wayne State University Division of Research | News | Comments

Mild cognitive impairment, or MCI, may be one of Alzheimer's earliest signs. The subtle changes...

Helping Heart-Failure Patients Self-Manage

April 20, 2015 9:48 am | by Stanford University Medical Center | News | Comments

Earl Shook knew he was in trouble. He couldn’t walk five feet without losing his breath and...

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New App Detects Teen Anxiety and Mood Disorders

April 20, 2015 9:31 am | by Rutgers University | News | Comments

A phone rings in the middle of the night, an anxious teen seeking guidance from a friend. Is it adolescent angst or a serious mental health problem? Sometimes, it can be hard to tell. For the app to work, the teen has to be willing to download...

FDA Approves Over-the-Counter Blood Glucose Meter

April 17, 2015 2:27 pm | by Abbott Laboratories | News | Comments

The cost of insurance premiums and employee medical claims continues to rise in the United States, which is especially challenging for people living with chronic conditions such as diabetes. For people with diagnosed diabetes, average, direct...

Why Has Remote Patient Monitoring Been So Slow to Adopt?

April 17, 2015 9:53 am | by Peter Ianace, Principal, Sensogram Technologies, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

Patients, providers, and insurers all have a vested interest in improving the health care system. Remote patient monitoring is the most logical place to start. We all agree that prevention is the most efficient way to shift the cost curve, improve...

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Leveraging Wi-Fi and Mobile Health in Combat Operations Settings

April 17, 2015 8:53 am | by U.S. Army | News | Comments

Imagine arriving at a major medical center with a life-threatening medical condition. Imagine now, this facility has no paging or cell phone capability. How will the right doctor be alerted that you need treatment to save your life? The Telemedicine...

Analyzing Medical Data via Your Smartphone

April 16, 2015 11:04 am | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Your smartphone could be a valuable tool for medical research — and for treating a variety of ailments. IBM wants to use the power of its Watson computing system — which famously won TV's "Jeopardy" a few years back — to analyze mountains...

Engineering a Smarter Stride

April 15, 2015 3:27 pm | by Ken Kingery, Duke University | News | Comments

If you asked Ivonna Dumanyan just five years ago where she’d be today, starting a running tech company at Duke University would never have crossed her mind. But thanks to a lot of hard work and the entrepreneurial resources provided across...

Transitioning from 'Sick Care' to Health Care

April 15, 2015 11:10 am | by TEDMED | Videos | Comments

At TEDMED 2014, Gary Conkright shared his views on how personalized, quantified health data is vital to our transition from “sick care” to health care.                                                                                      

Wristband May Help Predict Response to Antidepressants

April 15, 2015 9:33 am | by Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University | News | Comments

A wristband that records motion throughout a 24-hour cycle may be an inexpensive, safe way to determine which patients with major depressive disorder will respond best to commonly prescribed drugs such as Prozac. Selective serotonin reuptake...

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Dr. Watson Takes on Diabetes, but Medtronic Is Still Chief-of-Staff

April 14, 2015 3:15 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, @SeanFenske | Blogs | Comments

Today, I’m specifically looking at the announcement made by Medtronic that has the company joining forces with IBM and Watson to enhance the treatment of diabetes. The expected result is personalized diabetes management solutions that...

App Could Help Older Adults with Memory Loss

April 14, 2015 10:36 am | by Lauren Ingram, Pennsylvania State University | News | Comments

From time to time, forgetting to pay a bill, misplacing car keys or searching for reading glasses (while you’re wearing them) can be an irritating, yet normal, part of life. But for people over the age of 60, memory loss that encroaches into daily...

App Monitors Frequent Fliers' Radiation Exposure

April 14, 2015 9:50 am | by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) | News | Comments

Frequent fliers are now able to monitor their personal radiation exposure when flying using the TrackYourDose app. Behind the app lies intensive research work undertaken by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Since 1997 PTB has...

'Asleep-Yet-Aware' Remote Wireless Sensors

April 14, 2015 9:36 am | by DARPA | News | Comments

State-of-the-art military sensors today rely on “active electronics” to detect vibration, light, sound or other signals. That means they constantly consume power, with much of that power and time spent processing what often turns out to be...

Sending Rats into Space to Model the Effects of Aging

April 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by NASA/Johnson Space Center | News | Comments

Imagine if all of your physiological changes were hyper accelerated so that you passed through life cycles in weeks as opposed to decades. You'd be able to grow a beard overnight or your hair might begin graying in a matter of days or maybe...

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Solution-Grown Nanowires Make the Best Lasers

April 13, 2015 3:35 pm | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

Take a material that is a focus of interest in the quest for advanced solar cells. Discover a "freshman chemistry level" technique for growing that material into high-efficiency, ultra-small lasers. The result, disclosed today [Monday, April 13...

Polymer Coating Could Let Medical Sensors Communicate with Body

April 13, 2015 3:24 pm | by University of Akron | News | Comments

Research at The University of Akron to develop a polymer coating for medical sensors implanted in the body has attracted a $499,995 grant from the National Science Foundation. Gang Cheng, Ph.D., an assistant professor of chemical engineering...

Listen to Your Heart, Without the Extra Noise

April 13, 2015 2:51 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

With its PURE EP System, BioSig endeavors to remove the extraneous non-biologic “noise” that often plagues traditional methods of ECG and intracardiac recording, in order to receive a clear signal - devoid of any noise that the heart itself is not making...

3 Keys to Medical Device Development Excellence

April 13, 2015 11:29 am | by Mohan Ponnudurai, Industry Solution Director, Sparta Systems, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Some of the future-looking technological developments in medicine, including surgeries enabled by virtual reality, remote surgery, needle free treatments and even electronic aspirin, all have the same mission in mind – to deliver the highest level...

Hyper-Stretchable Elastic-Composite Energy Harvester

April 13, 2015 10:12 am | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

A research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has developed a hyper-stretchable elastic-composite energy harvesting...

An App to Help Students Stress Less

April 13, 2015 9:20 am | by University of Wollongong | News | Comments

The free app, ‘HSC Stress-Less’, was developed by psychology researchers at UOW with the assistance of high-achieving year 11 students at schools in the greater Sydney and Illawarra regions, including students at St George Christian School...

First Continuous Glucose Monitoring App for the Apple Watch

April 10, 2015 4:14 pm | by Dexcom | News | Comments

Dexcom, Inc., a leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that its Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitor System with Share will support the Apple Watch when it ships to customers on...

Inkjet-Printed Liquid Metal Could Bring Wearable Tech, Soft Robotics

April 10, 2015 1:36 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New research shows how inkjet-printing technology can be used to mass-produce electronic circuits made of liquid-metal alloys for "soft robots" and flexible electronics. Elastic technologies could make possible a new class of pliable robots...

Cost-Effective Production of Magnetic Sensors

April 10, 2015 10:52 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

They are found wherever other measurement methods fail: magnetic sensors. They defy harsh environmental conditions and also function in fluids. A new procedure is now revolutionizing the production of two-dimensional magnetic sensors: They...

Developing a Do-It-Yourself-Pancreas

April 10, 2015 8:30 am | by Charles Settles, Product Analyst, TechnologyAdvice | Blogs | Comments

Diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., receives the 37th-most research funding, according to the NIH. Seeing little progress, some diabetics are taking matters into their own hands. Health IT is one of the fastest growing...

Detecting Lysosomal pH with Better Fluorescent Probes

April 9, 2015 2:24 pm | by Michigan Technological University | News | Comments

Lysosomes are the garbage disposals of animal cells. As the resources are limited in cells, organic materials are broken down and recycled a lot -- and that's what lysosomes do. Detecting problems with lysosomes is the focus of a new set of...

Diabetes Won't Keep This IndyCar Driver Out of the Race

April 8, 2015 4:50 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

I couldn’t imagine driving a racecar like IndyCar driver Charlie Kimball does. My nerves couldn’t handle it. I tense up enough already pushing eighty on the highway – but driving two hundred miles an hour? All the while navigating the curve...

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