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Was reading this article about a security researcher, Jay Radcliffe, who has determined how easy it is for someone with the right tools to hack into a wireless medical device and wreak havoc on it. While I don’t think this is really all THAT shocking to medical device manufacturers who are producing these products, how many of them are truly paying enough attention to these types of concerns with their products?

Couple that with the fact that as more medical device products move out of hospitals and doctors’ offices and onto the patient in the form of cutting edge, portable medical devices, this problem only promises to increase in both the potential for problems and the seriousness of it. While not every device is going to prove as dangerous as an insulin pump or a cardiac pacemaker if hacked, the device maker’s reputation is sure to suffer when something even as innocuous as a pulse monitor is able to be breached. And as more of these types of devices appear commonly in public, the opportunity for a hacker’s attack grows as well.

If you are a device manufacturer currently producing a wireless medical device or even only in the early design stages, companies need to consider ALL potential sources for outside “interference” to their medical device. An innovative security solution to prevent an attack on your device could certainly be the difference between a successful product vs. an unwanted appearance on the nightly news as the latest device that’s been hacked.

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