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NEW YORK, Dec. 8, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Androgen deprivation therapy has often been prescribed as a prostate cancer treatment for low-risk prostate cancer patients. This therapy for treating prostate cancer had previously been blamed for increased risk of cardiovascular disease and heart conditions. However, this hormone treatment for prostate cancer has now become more controversial due to its two potential side effects, diabetes and obesity, which are risk factors for colorectal cancer. "Androgen deprivation therapy is overused, and now may be even more dangerous than previously thought," said Dr. Samadi, a robotic prostatectomy expert, as well as the Vice Chairman, Department of Urology, and Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

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The University of Michigan study, which appears in the December issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that androgen deprivation therapy, delivered via injections or surgical castration, resulted in a 30 to 40 percent increased risk for colorectal cancer. However, the absolute risk is small, with no more than a 2.5 percent absolute risk of colorectal cancer over a five-year period.

"When treating late-stage prostate cancer that has spread beyond the prostate gland, it's effective," said Dr. Samadi, "When coupled with radiation, it can be very beneficial in treating locally advanced prostate cancer." However, the study showed that as a primary therapy for lower-risk or localiz

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