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NEW YORK, Dec. 14, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study in the journal Cancer shows that staging prostate cancer that has not metastasized beyond the prostate gland does predict the outcome, prognosis or risk of cancer recurrence after a radical prostatectomy. "This study confirms what many prostate cancer treatment surgeons have thought about staging – it's irrelevant after prostate cancer surgery – something I strongly disagree with," said Dr. David Samadi, a robotic surgery expert, as well as the Vice Chairman, Department of Urology, and Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

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The study, which emanated from the University of California, San Francisco, was designed to prove how reliable the staging system was as well as what could account for the inaccuracy of prostate cancer staging when determining prognosis. It was found that in 35 percent of the nearly 4,000 cases, clinical stages of prostate cancer were assigned incorrectly, mostly due to overlooked results from prostate tests such as the transrectal ultrasound tests and biopsy results which were incorrectly measured in the staging process. However, even after these errors were resolved, researchers found no link between the stage and outcome after prostate removal surgery.

The study indicated that the PSA, Gleason score and other variables are more powerful prostate cancer screening indicators of recurrence than clinical staging. Researchers believe that these factors should be emphasized m

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