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MADRID, March 14, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Grifols, (MCE:GRF, MCE:GRF.P and NASDAQ: GRFS), a global healthcare company that specializes in the production of biological medicines derived from human plasma, presented study results today suggesting that the plasmapheresis process may reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol as well as total cholesterol in individuals who have high baseline levels.  The study also suggests that plasmapheresis could increase levels of "good" (HDL) cholesterol among individuals with low baseline levels.

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The study, involving 663 adults and 9,153 plasma samples, was designed to assess the impact of plasmapheresis on cholesterol levels in the blood.  Plasmapheresis is a technique widely used to obtain blood plasma from individuals while returning their remaining blood components.  Plasma obtained during plasmapheresis is used to produce life-saving medicines for patients who have rare, genetic and life-threatening illnesses.

"The results of our study suggest that plasmapheresis may reduce the levels of cholesterol, although the magnitude of the effect observed depends on the baseline levels of cholesterol and the time intervals between plasmapheresis procedures," said Dr. Marilyn Rosa-Bray, Chief Medical Officer of the Grifols Plasma Operations.  "While the results are preliminary and the study should be replicated in larger populations, our data suggest that plasmapheresis might particularly benefit people with either high LDL or total cholesterol levels," said Dr. Rosa-Bray.  Dr. Rosa-Bray presented the study today at the International Plasma Protein Conference (IPPC) meeting in Madrid, Spain. 

Study Results

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