Advertisement


A FingerReader ring lies on a book's page at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab in Cambridge, Mass. Researchers designed and developed the instrument, which enables people with visual disabilities to read text printed on paper or electronic devices. (AP Photo Stephan Savoia)


Current technology used in homes and offices offers cumbersome scanners that must process the desired script before it can be read aloud by character-recognition software installed on a computer or smartphone. The FingerReader would not replace Braille — the system of raised dots that form words, interpreted by touch. Instead, the new device would enable users to access a vast number of books and other materials that are not currently available in Braille. (AP Photo Stephan Savoia)


Reading is as easy as pointing the finger at text. Special software tracks the finger movement, identifies words and processes the information. The device has vibration motors that alert readers when they stray from the script, said Roy Shilkrot, who is developing the device at the MIT Media Lab. (AP Photo Stephan Savoia)

Read: 3D-Printed Device Reads to the Blind in Real Time

Advertisement
Advertisement